Traditional Linzer Christmas Cookies

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Introduction: Traditional Linzer Christmas Cookies

About: Mom, wife, traveler, baker, jewelry maker...and so much more! Web: www.tvorivamama.cz Instagram: The_Creative_Mom Facebook: www.facebook.com/tvorivamama.cz/

Baking cookies at Christmas is like a national sport in my country. Housewives compete over who baked the most types and the most ridiculous amounts of each type. The Linzer cookies are something you always find on a Czech Christmas table. I would like to show you a traditional recipe which has been in my family for generations. Nowadays there are many modern recipes for these cookies to make the cookies instantly soft but the dough just doesn't taste well. With this recipe I guarantee that although you have to let the cookies rest, even the dough itself tastes really great.

Supplies:

- 500 g of all-purpose flour and a little for the table

- 240 g of powder sugar

- 240 g of unsalted butter

- 4 egg yolks

- 100 ml of fullfat milk

- aprox. 400 of 100% red or black currant marmelade - if you can't get your hands on currant marmelade, use any other but the Linzer cookies taste the best with currant marmelade because it's acid and contrasts nicely with the sweet dough

- cookie cutters - traditionally round (circle, flower etc.) but you can use any

- round cookie cutter diameter 1 cm

- baking paper and tray

- rolling pin

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Step 1: Make the Dough

Combine the flour and sugar in a bowl, then add the egg yolks, milk and butter. The butter should be soft but don't melt it! Just leave it out of the fridge and at room temperature for some time. The consistency of the butter affects the texture of the dough. Also, you can use alternatives like vegetable fat but the cookies will loose their traditional buttery taste.

Knead the dough with your hands until you get absolutely smooth dough without any lumps.

Step 2: Make the Cookies

Sprinkle your table with some flour and roll out the dough, the ideal thickness is somewhere around 5 mm or a little less. Cut out an even number of cookies and place them on the baking paper on the tray. Then using the small circular cutter, cut out small circles in the middle of half of your cookies.

Preheat the over on 170 °C and bake the cookies for 10 minutes or until they start turning golden. Take them out of the oven and let them cool completely.

Step 3: Here Comes the Marmelade!

Put some marmelade in the center of each cookie without a hole and then place another cookie WITH a hole on the marmelade and press a little with your fingers.

At this point, your cookies will alredy taste delicious but they will be a little hard. We make the cookies 2-4 weeks before Christmas and let them rest in a cardboard box covered with napkins. They soften nicely during this time.

Before you serve the cookies, sprinkle them with a little powder sugar.

Enjoy!

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    4 Discussions

    0
    mrkvica95
    mrkvica95

    22 days ago

    It looks delicious. I am going to make these cookies as soon as possible, especially because it is easy to make them.

    0
    Creative Mom CZ
    Creative Mom CZ

    Reply 21 days ago

    Thank you for the nice comment!

    0
    gcai_fwb
    gcai_fwb

    6 weeks ago

    These look great ! but a minor quibble I think these are more like Hilda Brotchen (umlaut on the o) than Linzer cookies - Hilda are shortbread based, Linzer traditionally been almond flour/meal based (could use other nuts too) - both taste just great!

    0
    Creative Mom CZ
    Creative Mom CZ

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    In Czechia the Linzer cookies are traditionally made with wheat flour, I understand that there can be differences from country to country and as far as I know the Linzer cookies are commonly made at least in 4.