3D Printed Ukulele

Introduction: 3D Printed Ukulele

The 3D Printed Ukulele was something that I made to get a better understanding of 3D modeling. All of the parts needed for the project can either be 3D printed, or bought easily online or at a music store. All files for the project will be included with the tutorial.

Link to print files

Supplies

●The included 3D models

●Store-bought strings

Step 1: Gather the Necessary Materials

All of the materials are either linked to for printing, or can be easily purchased from a music store, or online retailer. If you do not have access to a 3D printer to print the ukulele parts, you can try to look for a Maker Space or similar type of location to print them at.

Step 2: Drill Holes Into the Dialing Knobs and Saddle

This is just to allow for strings to be placed in, and tuned later on. The holes on the saddle do not have to be perfectly evenly spaced, but holes at around the distance pictured will create optimal results.

Step 3: Slide the Bridge Into the Saddle

There is a distinct rectangular cutout in the saddle for the bridge to be placed as pictured. It pay require some force, but once it is placed, the hardest part about assembling the ukulele is complete.

Step 4: Put the Face on the Body

This step just requires you to place the face of the ukulele onto the body, which has a shelf inside for easy placement. Once it is in place, you should use epoxy to keep it in place.

Step 5: Tighten the Tuning Dials Into the Headstaff

This step is fairly intuitive; screw the dials into place on the top of the ukulele neck. They may have some resistance at first, but over time, they will wear to usable amounts of resistance.

Step 6: Fasten the Neck Into the Body

This step is also straight forward; place the pegs of the neck into the two holes on the body, then fasten them in place with epoxy.

Step 7: String the Ukulele

Once the instrument, you can tie and fasten the strings into the string holes that you drilled. This was my second Instructable, and first big 3D model, so it's not that great in my opinion, but I hope you enjoy it. :)

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    10 Comments

    0
    hck1
    hck1

    1 year ago

    Ooh I love this. I voted for this! Leaves me with one question: Will it bend when the strings are fully tuned? i.e. will it stay in tune and is it easy to tune? Please, please share long-term experience.

    0
    GenuineN
    GenuineN

    Reply 1 year ago

    It does bend when the strings are tensioned, so I’m working on a revised version with a metal reinforcement bar.

    0
    hck1
    hck1

    Reply 1 year ago

    YEAH. Pls. pls. keep us informed. My dream is a traveller ukulele which would be 40 cm in total length. Smaller = less bend. A quiet uke would be really great. For inspiration you might take a look at "risa solid soprano" or "traveller guitars ukulele".

    0
    Hey Jude
    Hey Jude

    Question 1 year ago

    Video pleeeease! How's it sound?? So cool. Need not be perfect, but excited to hear!

    0
    Hey Jude
    Hey Jude

    Reply 1 year ago

    Cool!

    0
    CombatRobotGuy15
    CombatRobotGuy15

    1 year ago

    I built a 3d printed instrument a while ago and the strings put ways to much compression onto the instrument without other supports (carbon fiber rod, etc). Is this why there is no finished product? If so I might be able to help.

    0
    GenuineN
    GenuineN

    Reply 1 year ago

    Yes, it is why there’s no finished product. I’m in the middle of redesigning the ukulele to include internal support rods, a better tuning system, and improved object quality. This is very much a work in progress.

    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    1 year ago

    That's impressive! Do you have a video of how it sounds when played?

    You should consider using a picture of the finished guitar as your main image so people can see it assembled right away!