Clean Range Hood Filters the Magic Way!

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Introduction: Clean Range Hood Filters the Magic Way!

Do you want to see some magic? If you've ever tried scrubbing all the gunky grease build-up out of your range hood filters, only to smear it around and not see much improvement, get ready for some magic!

This method is surprisingly simple, and it's simply amazing that something so simple is this effective.

You'll be so excited watching all the grease just boil away... and you just ~might~ text all your friends a picture of the nasty greasy mess that ~used~ to be in your now-brand-new-looking filters. (Ask me how I know!)

Supplies

Supplies

  • Yucky, greasy range hood filters
  • A pot wide enough to hold them
  • Water
  • Baking soda
  • Tongs

Step 1: Gather a Few Supplies

Find a pot that is wide enough for your filters to stand upright in it. A canner or large stockpot works well if your filters are oversized. It's okay if the pot isn't as tall as the filter; you can just clean one end, and then turn the filter over, and clean the other end.

Step 2: Prepare Solution

Place your pot on the stove. Fill it with water, and bring the water to boiling over High heat.

Once the water is boiling, slowly, VERY SLOWLY add 1/2 c. of Baking soda, about one tablespoon at a time. It will foam up and fizz rather wildly; that's why it's important to add the baking soda slowly.

Step 3: Insert the Greasy Filter

Put the icky filter into the boiling solution for about 15 minutes. If your pot is large enough, you may be able to put in two or more filters at a time.

As the water boils, watch as the grease bubbles to the surface.

Step 4: Rinse and Dry

After 15 minutes, carefully remove the filter with tongs.

Run hot tap water over the filter to rinse.

If the filter is completely clean, allow it to dry thoroughly before replacing it in the range hood.

In extreme cases of grease build-up, Steps 2-3 may need to be repeated (using fresh water and baking soda) to achieve sparkling clean filters.

When cleaning up, be sure to pour the greasy water outside, and not down your sink drain.

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    34 Comments

    0
    onetruegod
    onetruegod

    1 year ago

    Hi All
    I would be cautious using this on filters as they are often made of aluminium. The surface of aluminium stays shiny because of a thin oxide layer which forms in air and prevents further corrosion. Alkaline solutions like baking soda remove this oxide layer and allow further oxidation to occur. Initially it will dull the surface finish, then it will pit the metal and ultimately it will corrode it away.

    Here we would separate the grease & water and put the grease in the city compost bin along with all other kitchen waste.
    You can also put the filters in a tray/pan and spray them with oven cleaner . Rinse off after 15 - 20 min.

    0
    RaisingBlessings
    RaisingBlessings

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you. Yes--both good ideas.

    0
    zimmy63
    zimmy63

    Reply 1 year ago

    A lot of the filters are aluminum and if I'm not mistaken oven cleaner slowly eats aluminum.

    0
    IsabelG43
    IsabelG43

    Question 1 year ago on Step 4

    Will this work on electrostatic air filters from my furnace? They are not greasy, just filled with air handler dust bunnies (rather funky gray monsters infused into the filter)
    Thanks in advance for your input. I’m now going to try blasting my baking sheets (aluminum mesh round gizmos)

    0
    zimmy63
    zimmy63

    Answer 1 year ago

    I would try a shop vacuum.

    0
    IsabelG43
    IsabelG43

    Reply 1 year ago

    OMG! I hate when the obvious eludes me! Thank you zimmy63. You broought a smile to me today, and I really needed one. Stay healthy.

    0
    zimmy63
    zimmy63

    Reply 1 year ago

    My pleasure. We all do that once in a while. You stay healthy as well.

    0
    JohnC430
    JohnC430

    Answer 1 year ago

    are those filters washable? if they are just stainless steel mesh then you will need to use a ultrasonic cleaner and if they are made of cardboard or paper mesh then ... no luck with either method.
    Your vacume cleaner may help a little but will also not be very effective.

    0
    IsabelG43
    IsabelG43

    Reply 1 year ago

    Yes, they are washable. I hose them down once a month, but unfortunately I have been unable to do that task for the last 3 months. When I pulled them out last week to clean, they were horrible. I have rinsed them with hot water, but I'm sort of afraid to use chemicals. I guess I'll try contacting the manufacturer. Thanks for the response

    0
    RaisingBlessings
    RaisingBlessings

    Answer 1 year ago

    I'm sorry; I don't have any experience cleaning furnace filters this way. Perhaps another reader does, though!

    0
    IsabelG43
    IsabelG43

    Reply 1 year ago

    thanks for the feedback

    0
    jkkucharik
    jkkucharik

    1 year ago on Step 4

    Great idea, although you want to make sure to use a Stainless Steel pot (no Aluminium) as the Vinegar can pit the Aluminium. Also could use a large Turkey roaster pan which would allow for laying the filter down instead of standing up in a pot

    0
    celiosantos
    celiosantos

    Reply 1 year ago

    Yes try it only in ferrous, glass ou ceramic tube or pot, The alkaline sodium bicarbonate reacts with the aluminum and can cause your pots and pans to discolor and may corrode it a litle bit.

    2
    JohnC430
    JohnC430

    Reply 1 year ago

    I dont understand why he said the Baking soda will fizz and foam in the hot water, unless he missed mentioning the vinegar.
    I did not see any reference to vinegar. if mixing baking soda with vinegar, they both get neutralized and the solution becomes useless.
    You can also use drain cleaner which is concentrated Sodium hydroxide and will do the job better and may also eat up your Aluminum pot.

    I usually put my filters into the dishwasher which works just as well. they come out clean

    0
    Acarolinensis
    Acarolinensis

    Reply 1 year ago

    Where were you in high school chemistry?
    Gross oversimplifications:
    Acids like vinegar, lemon juice, etc. dissolve metals like aluminum, iron, etc.
    Bases like baking soda, lye, ammonia, etc. dissolve organic materials like grease, hair, etc.
    Baking soda added to hot water will bubble even though the water started with a neutral pH. Just because it bubbles doesn't mean there is an acid involved.
    Baking soda is an *excellent* cleaner for grease and stuff burned on to pans. You can trade off time for heat: just leave an item soaking overnight in baking soda & water rather than heating the water up beforehand.

    1
    Rickesss
    Rickesss

    Reply 1 year ago

    Where do you see to use vinegar?
    You must be looking at another website!

    0
    jkkucharik
    jkkucharik

    Reply 1 year ago

    You are correct, My Bad, no Vinegar involved! Too much multitasking today. sorry for the mis information.

    0
    AndrewL323
    AndrewL323

    1 year ago

    I did similar and used soda crystals... ended up with a sink full of soup... nyom. One word of warning, I’ve been told that the file tees can tarnish if you use the wrong chemicals on them, suspect that baking soda will be fine.
    The manual for my hood says I can put the filters through the dishwasher, which I am yet to try.

    77BA6A6D-6A99-458C-9673-70C4AD87C216.jpeg
    0
    jimwi
    jimwi

    Reply 1 year ago

    Make shore the filters are not aluminum as most dishwasher soaps have caustic soda in them which will eat into/dissolve them.