Easy Shakshuka

Introduction: Easy Shakshuka

This simple recipe takes only about 15 minutes to prep and 30 minutes to cook.

Being based in Dubai, one dish we keep seeing on the menu is shakshuka. Many people enjoy it for breakfast, but its rich flavors are well suited for lunch or even dinner. Shakshuka translates from Arabic to mean "all mixed up", but don't worry, the steps for a good shakshuka are simple and straightforward.

To get started you will need to collect the ingredients below as well as a large skillet or cast iron pot.

Supplies

  • 5-6 eggs
  • 1/2 onion chopped
  • 1/2 tbsp chopped parsley (cilantro works well too)
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • 1 bell pepper
  • 2 cans of diced tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp of olive oil
  • 1 tsp chili powder for taste
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Pinch of sugar
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Step 1: Step 1: Onion, Garlic, Bell Pepper

Start with the diced onion and garlic and cook them in about a tablespoon of olive oil until tender.

Add bell pepper and continue to cook for about 5-7minutes.

Step 2: Step 2: Sugar and Spice and Everything Nice (like Tomatoes)

Add the tomatoes, tomato paste, pinch of sugar and spices (1 tsp cumin and 1 tsp paprika).

Cook for another 5-7 minutes.

Step 3: Step 3: Extra Seasoning for Extra Flavor

Now is the time to add salt, pepper and chili powder to flavor it.

Pinch by pinch, taste and adjust as needed.

Step 4: Step 4: Egg Time

If the sauce is starting to look too thick, add a splash of water.

Then, crack those eggs into the tomato mixture.

Space them apart and let them cook over easy on top of the sauce.

Cover them and let them cook for 10-15 minutes.

Take a peak every now and then to make sure the sauce doesn't reduce too much and start to burn.

Step 5: Step 5: Dish Is Done, ...Dig In!

When the eggs look cooked, take it off the heat, and sprinkle with parsley or cilantro for added color and flavor.

Try your own variations of shakshuka with cheese or ground beef.

Serve with toasted bread or pita and enjoy.

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    10 Comments

    0
    holtonm
    holtonm

    1 year ago

    1. Cast iron does not heat up evenly, needs a little time for the entire surface to come up to temp. Prepping in an oven is good but probably not necessary for this recipe.

    2. Recipe never suggests how high the heat should be for the various steps (I guess we're supposed to assume low or a little higher). Too high a heat in the beginning will burn the vegetables, spices.

    3. Garlic burns easily, especially when chopped or sliced. Either monitor it carefully at lower heat or add it after the bellpepper and stir it frequently to avoid overcooking.

    4. I would add the spices before the sauce to let them "bloom". It releases fat-soluble flavor compounds contained within spices like cumin and coriander. Also, adding spices to cooking oil will distribute their flavor far more efficiently in the finished dish than either adding them to the liquid component or stirring them in at the end.

    0
    AlchemiasArt
    AlchemiasArt

    1 year ago

    What’s “2 cans of tomatoes” in measurement-speak? I have cans of tomatoes in various volumes, and also many tomato plants. 😊

    0
    macshout
    macshout

    Reply 1 year ago

    Good point. I was automatically thinking of the 28 oz 769 ml size, but saying to myself that they would way overwhelm the recipe, and was going to start with half of that, and add more if needed. If you can find (or make) passata, that is a great ingredient to adjust recipes to a nice consistency. It's a bit thicker than tomato sauce, and great for non-Italian style dishes such as cabbage rolls. Okay I don't know if cabbage rolls are actually non-Italian, but the way we make them is without basil, thyme, rosemary or oregano. Garlic depends on the day, though it rarely gets much time off, even for good behaviour.

    1
    gen81465
    gen81465

    Reply 1 year ago

    Cabbage rolls are (predominantly) Polish, and are usually called Sarma. As soon as I find the time to actually post an instructible myself, I'm going to do "Unstuffed Cabbage Rolls". It makes a great stew (or soup, if you thin the mixture).

    0
    gen81465
    gen81465

    Reply 1 year ago

    Probably 2 - 14.5-ounce cans, or 1 - 28-ounce can.

    0
    AlchemiasArt
    AlchemiasArt

    Reply 1 year ago

    Awesome! Thank you so much!

    0
    rozzieozzie
    rozzieozzie

    1 year ago

    I've been wanting to make this and now have no excuse! Thanks for what has to be a delicious recipe!

    1
    neon_bunny
    neon_bunny

    1 year ago

    Wow, looks delicious! Now I'm hungry :)

    1
    hamidsagh
    hamidsagh

    1 year ago on Step 5

    I love this dish among my favorites, in Morocco we call it taktouka wich name is close to shakshouka.