FIXING a BROKEN FRANKLIN LIBRARY CHAIR

Introduction: FIXING a BROKEN FRANKLIN LIBRARY CHAIR

About: In my shop I have a name for hammer, saw, and plier. The saw is Tess, the hammer's Joe, and Glumdalclitch is the plier. Yes, I'm brillig, and my slithy toves still gyre and gimble in the wabe. With that, le…

Here is a link to the original build of the Franklin Library Chair: https://www.instructables.com/id/FRANKLIN-LIBRARY-...

It was damaged in a move from California to North Carolina.

Step 1: THE DAMAGE

The chair was damaged in two places. One of the legs was broken and it was an easy glue together fix. The other was the very edge of the seat where a hinge was. To replace the entire seat would ruin the chair since the seat was not only glued but screwed in place.

Step 2: TRIMMING OFF THE DAMAGE

This chair was made from soft pine. I decided to replace the front edge of the seat with a strong wood and used oak. First, I had to trim off the broken part. I set the circular saw to the proper depth, used the oak board as a guide against which to run the foot of my circular saw, and trimmed the broken part of the seat off.

Step 3: THE REPAIR PIECE

I trimmed the oak board to the exact width of the seat and rounded over the edges to match the round over of the library chair seat. My sharpening stone is also a jig for setting 22.5°and 45°degree angles on my table saw. I trimmed the oak board to the proper depth and proper 22.5° angle.

Step 4: ATTACHING THE REPAIR

First, I checked the fit. Then I marked the placement of the hinges. I glued the repair piece in place. I drilled 3 pilot holes between the location of the hinges, secured the piece with trim screws, counter sunk the head of each screw and used bamboo skewers to plug the holes, and trimmed and sanded smooth when glue dried.

Step 5: MORTISING FOR THE HINGES AND STAIN

I took my time mortising for the hinges. The stain took some finessing to get it to match since oak and pine absorb differently.

Step 6: ALL FIXED

I clamped the two parts of the Library Chair together, drilled pilot holes, and hand-screwed the soft brass screws in rather than using a drill. I could feel the oak really grab the screws and knew I had a good repair. The oak did stain a bit differently from the pine, but all-in-all not too shabby. The main thing is that it is once again functional. Ben Franklin would be proud.

Let me know what you think.

Fix It Contest

Participated in the
Fix It Contest

Be the First to Share

    Recommendations

    • Micro:bit Contest

      Micro:bit Contest
    • Soup & Stew Speed Challenge

      Soup & Stew Speed Challenge
    • Make it Move Challenge

      Make it Move Challenge

    2 Comments

    0
    Alex in NZ
    Alex in NZ

    1 year ago

    Good recovery! Well done and thanks for sharing :-)
    (Though it could also be offered as an argument for not moving long distances. Just sayin')

    0
    Kink Jarfold
    Kink Jarfold

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi, Alex, the move was a necessity, unfortunately, and it really devastated my son from which he has recovered. All is well. And thanks for the comment. I would've hated tossing this chair our.