First Boardgame Ever! Royal Game of Ur

Introduction: First Boardgame Ever! Royal Game of Ur

About: illustrator, animator, builder of things

I, too, was inspired after watching Irving Finkle explain how to play this ancient board game.
Here's a link to the video: https://youtu.be/WZskjLq040I

What makes this rendition different from other "Game of Ur" instructables is the tile graphic application.

The toner transfer method and materials are from https://decalprofx.com/

Supplies:

Wood
Pencil
Ruler
Clamps
Trim Router
Toner transfer paper
Mylar
White toner reactive foil
Laminater
Blank W4 tetrahedron dice
Sharpie marker
Game chips

Step 1: Find a Board

Find yourself a board somewhere that isn't supporting anything.
Draw a grid with a pen or pencil. A ruler helps to keep the lines straight.
Use a trim router to route out the lines. You could also use a table saw.
Cut the notches from the sides and you're off to a good start.
Be careful! Ask a grown-up to do it for you

Step 2: Apply the Tile Graphics

Print this pdf on toner transfer paper, and you can pretty much iron them onto your wood block.

If you'd like to use white or shiny graphics, though, I recommend https://decalprofx.com/ for your toner transfer needs. (I don't work for them. I'm just a satisfied customer)

Step 3: Chips and Dice

I didn't feel like making my own chips or W4 tetrahedron dice, so I ordered those from Ebay.

I chose black and brown colored chips to keep it looking oldendays-ish and used a black sharpie to mark the corners of blank white dice.

Step 4: Box and Instructions

This pdf can be printed onto a card stock paper and folded and glued into a neat box to carry your chips and dice.

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    Discussions

    0
    Alex in NZ
    Alex in NZ

    1 year ago

    Beautiful! This is the closest to the British Museum one which I've seen. I obviously need to investigate those transfers as a "laser-etch" substitute. Thank you for sharing your work :-)