How to Fix Stripped Bar Stud Holes on a Stihl MS250 Chainsaw

Introduction: How to Fix Stripped Bar Stud Holes on a Stihl MS250 Chainsaw

A chainsaw with no bar and chain is useless/junk and without the bar studs being tightly held in the chainsaw body the loose studs will cause the nuts to loosen, and eventually the bar will fall off of the saw. So in this instructable I will be showing you how to fix stripped bar stud holes. Let's get started!

Supplies

1/4" Flathead Screwdriver
J-B Weld
Carburetor Cleaner
Rag
Pliers

Step 1: Removing the Studs and Cleaning the Threads

First you want to remove the nuts and bar cover. Now grab the studs with a pair of pliers one at a time and turn them counterclockwise until they come out ( Don't squeeze too hard with the pliers or you will damage the threads for the nuts) . Now you want to clean the stud threads they will probably have the plastic threads from the holes in the saw body still stuck to them. Just grab the stud with a rag and turn the stud back and forth like your screwing it in and out of the rag. Now that you have removed the plastic threads from the studs spray them with carburetor cleaner and wipe off with a clean rag. Using carburetor cleaner will get rid of any oil or dirt that will prevent the J-B Weld from making a strong bond.

Step 2: Cleaning Out the Holes in the Saw Body

To clean out the holes start by spraying carburetor cleaner in the holes and then take a small piece of a rag and stuff it in the hole using your flathead screwdriver. Once the tip of the rag is at the bottom of the hole turn your screwdriver back and forth clockwise then counterclockwise several times. Do this step twice for both holes to ensure a clean bonding surface for the J-B Weld.

Step 3: Mixing the J-B Weld and Installing the Studs Back Into the Saw Body

Start by mixing the J-B Weld. Follow the mixing instructions on the package you need about a quarter sized drop of hardener and a quarter sized drop of steel and you should have plenty. Mix together with your 1/4" Flathead Screwdriver. Scoop up a small amount of the mixed j-B weld and smear it on the inside of the hole in the saw body keep smearing it on until the J-B weld is all around the hole now roll the stud in the J-B Weld and thread it back into the hole using your pliers. There will be resistance because of air that needs to escape from the hole but keep working it until the round flat part of the stud is flush with the saw body. Now all you need to do is wipe off the excess J-B Weld from the saw body and let it cure for at least 24 hours before attaching the bar to the saw.

Step 4: Done!

The studs are now held tightly in the saw body again. They are just as strong as they were when the saw was new, probably stronger! I hope this will be helpful if you're in need of a repair like this. Thanks for reading!

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    2 Comments

    0
    schmittcs
    schmittcs

    Tip 4 months ago on Step 3

    Make sure there is no JB Weld in the upper bar oiler port or channel. Brake cleaner works very well for this as you clean up the excess epoxy after the stud is installed. Also, Why not clean out the oil tank before refilling it with oil. Use a small amount of gasoline, put the oil cap on and shake the saw. Dump the gas and use brake cleaner to rinse the tank.

    0
    schmittcs
    schmittcs

    Tip 4 months ago on Step 1

    Rather than using pliers to remove the studs, use the two nuts (one from each stud). Put both nuts on one stud and jam them together so they act as one and use them to turn the stud out.

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