It's Dead Blow Hammer Time

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Introduction: It's Dead Blow Hammer Time

About: Hi! My name is Hans, I live in Scandinavia where I build whatever pops up in my head, out on to my sketchbook and finally into my hands. My projects here are my favorites and I hope some might inspire you. Rem…

I've been fascinated by hammers for a long time. Being humankind's first tool it has been iterated on over thousands of years and the number of hammer types are countless. So was this a good idea to embark on…?

You'll find out if you spend $10 on material:-)

For many of my builds, Laura Kampf has been a great source of inspiration (her beer bike became my bike cinema) A while back she made a dead blow hammer, it stuck with me but it was only recently this twist to how I could make my very own version landed in my head.

There are countless other inspirational sources here, Zachary (www.zhfabrications.com) I met at Makers Central two years ago, makes beautiful hammers. Adam Savage made a hammer of a book:-)

Supplies

Round stock to fit your choice of pipe, 20 cm

1/2' T-coupling, brass, copper… or other metal

1/2' fitting

1/2' cap

Bike tire tube

Magnet

3D filament

Tool:

Sanding paper (electrical sander)

Metal saw (cutting both the round stock and the fitting)

3D printer, optional!

Step 1: Can You Handle It…

Fitting the round stock to the 1/2' t-coupling is the first step. You can either sand it by hand or have the sander do it. Make sure you do this at a very slight angle. I measured with my calipers to get the right diameter from the coupling to match where I would cut the round stock.

Then gently screw the handle in place, make sure it is straight, unscrew if too tight. You don't want it to block the inside of the pipe.

Step 2: Hammer Head Fitting

Pretty straight forward this next step, add your desired parts to the t-coupling. I could have chosen a cap with threads but for weight and symmetry, I chose to add a fitting before the cap.

The threads on the outer side were too long so I shaved off a few millimeters so the cap would screw all the way in.

Step 3: Filling the Head

For this hammer to become a dead blow hammer the head needs to be filled with lead pellets. These small lead balls make the hammer hit the target with minimal rebound from the struck surface.

The size of the lead pellets depends on how big your hammerhead is.

Step 4: Plastic Fantastic Hammer…?

Well, this hammer is no ordinary hammer, it's my hammer and I can do what I want. So I thought a 3D printed hammerhead would be a nice option since the t-coupling already has threads.

One of my favorite Fusion 360 tools is the thread option. I made a couple of different shapes and printed this with 100% fill for a more solid punch.

Printed on my PRUSA i3 mk3.

Step 5: Adding Some Comfort

I could go with a naked handle but decided to dress it up with a piece of bike tire tubing. Gives a better grip and I like the look of it. I made sure the tubing was tight enough so I could pull it on but I wouldn't move around.

Step 6: Adding a Happy Ending

Since I already made one side of the hammerhead 3D printed it was no surprise I made a second part to the end of the handle containing a magnet. This little add-on makes for easy nail retrieval:-)

Step 7: Nailed It…?!

It is dangerous to enter the sea of hammers, I can imagine a few hardcore hammerheads out there shrugs and laugh at this build. Is it really a hammer? Will it make Laura proud…?

So far I'm quite happy with this new hammer of mine, there are some interesting uses. For one I use the plastic head for hammering plastic parts when assembling 3D prints. As you can see, I made 3 hammers, all very similar but variations in metal, thickness, and head shape.

Please hammer in your thoughts and feedback, would love to see other uses of the pipe fittings:-)

Who's up for a hammer duel? Laura? Laura!!

If you enjoyed this Instructables please follow along over at my Instagram: @smogdog for more builds…

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    16 Comments

    0
    tinwellpaul
    tinwellpaul

    1 year ago

    An interesting concept. What stops the head from flying free of the handle?

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Answer 1 year ago

    Arthur is on point! I chose not to glue mine and go for a tight fit. This hammer is not building a house but used on special projects, soft blows and mall nails:-)
    Depends on the T coupling, but you should have a good 2cm thread hold.
    Cheers

    Hans g

    0
    ArthurJ5
    ArthurJ5

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks! I plan on making some and experimenting with different sizes. Maybe using adapters to gain more length to secure the handle a bit better. Remember it's not only the strength or energy of the strike but the longevity of the tool after many small strikes.

    I need a small hammer for guitar frets and a big one for timber work.

    I think rubber bottle stoppers from wine makers might work, or cast my own from epoxy or caulk instead of buying a 3D printer.

    0
    ArthurJ5
    ArthurJ5

    Best Answer 1 year ago

    It simply screws on. I don’t know if that’s secure enough for a hammer. You could epoxy it or drill a hole and run a brass rod through and peen it over.

    0
    seawolf7071
    seawolf7071

    1 year ago on Step 4

    Love the project. My only problem is that very few who do these projects, myself included , do not have access to a 3D printer or a lathe. Show me how to do this without that printer and I would be a happier camper. The general public, should be able to do 'instructables' without all of the 'machines'.

    0
    AnnieG1
    AnnieG1

    Reply 1 year ago

    Similar to the brass side, i think you could purchase the nylon version of those fittings. Hmmm... or maybe carve from equivalent? Bore a hole in a large rubber stopper.

    0
    AnnieG1
    AnnieG1

    Reply 1 year ago

    P.S. I do have a 3D printer and may still even investigate alternatives.

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi Annie!
    Would love to see your investigation unfold:-)
    Rubber stopper, hard wood, cork even… and with epoxy you could make anything fit.
    Cheers
    Hans g

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi and thanks for the feedback Seawolf! I hear you and understand your point. I only got into 3D printing 1,5 years ago. Before that I used online services like 3Dhub (no longer available) and Shapeways. I believe there are two ways to 3D printing, the easy way but not cheap is to buy the printer and download printable files online and print them yourself. The other way is to start 3D modeling and "find" a 3D printer, at the library, friends of friends, makerspaces, and online services. I found 3D printing to be most valuable when I set out to learn the cad software (Lars Christensen is a great start, Fusion 360: https://youtu.be/A5bc9c3S12g)
    Both Tinkercad and Fusion 360 is free to hobbyists.
    The other good news is that 3D printers are getting cheaper, 200-300$.
    Before I bought mine I was able to borrow a printer, best tip if possible. To me it has become one of my favorite tools, but only because I am designing my own files:-)

    I still hope you have a go at the pipe hammer, would love to see your take on it!

    Cheers

    Hans g

    0
    MrTrick
    MrTrick

    Reply 1 year ago

    True, but 3D printers *are* a pretty amazing enabler for all kinds of projects.
    (and a project that uses only manual crafting techniques might equally receive feedback like "I'm not skilled enough to make that part, is there a way to 3D print it?")

    That said, any instructable might benefit from a general section entitled "What can I do if I don't have those same tools?" :-)

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Good point Mr Trick!
    Maybe a filter, where you could mark off tools you have/don't have…
    My absolute favorite thing with Instructables is the vastness of expertise, tools, and ideas. To me a well of inspiration:-)
    Cheers
    Hans g

    0
    mooremob
    mooremob

    1 year ago

    I’m with you guys, I don’t have a 3D printer, but I do have an Nissan Leaf and I happen to be I of 1% in the UK that have one I think it’s the same for 3D printers.

    0
    AndrewL32
    AndrewL32

    Reply 1 year ago

    Our local public library has a 3D printer, I get all my stuff printed there, and its cheaper than me having to invest in a printer for now. There are plenty of clubs that have 3D printers, just ask around.

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Best tip Andrew! I run a mini makerspace at the local library, we have two printers:-) And I got my own at my workshop.
    Cheers
    Hans g

    0
    Pricklysauce
    Pricklysauce

    1 year ago

    You nailed it 😲

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Haha! With this hammer, there is no way back:-)