Kill a Wasp Inside Your Home

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Introduction: Kill a Wasp Inside Your Home

About: There are some things you should just NEVER do.....

A NEW way to Safely and Easily Kill a Wasp that's inside Your Home

I just hate that sound - Buzzing and tapping on a window! A quick peek and I see it's one of my worst fears...a wasp trapped inside the house!... HELLLP!

If I try to whack it I might miss and it's likely to get mad - watch out!...

I hope I don't get stung during the extermination process...

If I use a poison spray what will it do to the surface behind the wasp that gets sprayed?

Will the poison overspray get onto food or counter tops?

What about the toxic cloud let loose inside the house?

Was that spray for outdoor use only?

Yikes!

Well here is a method that is fairly simple; uses no insecticide, takes down a wasp quickly, kills easily and leaves no residue behind.

I freeze wasps with cold spray!

You might ask, "And where does one get such a fancy 'cold spray'?" and, "Does it cost an arm and a leg?"

The type of 'cold spray' found on the market is usually a super cold spray refrigerant used by electronics technicians to cool and troubleshoot hot semiconductors. It's a Freon-like, expensive specialty item.

But why use that stuff when most 'Canned Air' or 'Electronics Duster' products will do? You can buy a can of 'Electronics Duster' at Big Box, Electronics or Office Supply stores.

You can even get a small can of it at the Dollar Tree store; and yes, for just a dollar!

Now that's an inexpensive 'waspinator'.

Supplies

Can of 'Electronics Duster' or 'Canned Air' spray

CAUTION:

Don't spray at people. Don't spray on clothing. Don't spray at skin. Don't get liquid spray on skin as it can cause instant frostbite. Spray may be flammable.

Follow the safety cautions on the can of spray.

Step 1: Practice the Correct Spray Technique

In the 'normal' right-side-up orientation the 'Electronics Duster' spray can contains liquified gas under pressure with gas under pressure sitting on top of the liquid. You want to use liquid on the wasp. To dispense the liquid you turn the can upside down.

You don't want to botch the extermination of the wasp so practice ahead of time to get the spray technique right. You want to spray the liquid (actually gently dripple/spritz liquid) on the wasp.

The can of 'Electronics Duster' ('Canned Air') MUST BE USED UPSIDE DOWN or it won't spray liquid. You want liquid to come out as it's super cold and should immobilize the wasp. If you use the spray right side up it will just blow the wasp around.

Holding the can upside down, practice pulling the trigger just enough to have a spray of small droplets come out. You don't want a blast of white spray like a CO2 fire extinguisher or a rocket engine!

Tip: Shooting a quick short half-burst of spray pointed away from the wasp can cool the plastic extension tube and make it easier to get droplets out on subsequent 'little squirts'. Be careful. Practice.

CAUTION: The spray, and especially the liquid, is extremely cold and can cause frostbite instantly. The spray can also cause glass to shatter if the glass is hot and too much liquid spray hits the glass. The spray may be flammable. Use Caution.

[If you happen to have a can of electronic component cooler, it can be used right side up as it is designed to spray liquid out when upright in order to cool those hot electronic semiconductors. Conversely, an upside down can of electronics duster can be used as an electronics component cooler - Who knew!]

Step 2: Locate Wasp - Grab Duster Spray Can

You obviously want a clean shot at the wasp. Sometimes this may be difficult, but be patient. Patience will keep you from getting stung.

Ideally you want to apply spray parallel to any glass to concentrate the liquid on the wasp and not the glass (to avoid any glass shattering from the cold).

Grab the can of spray - UPSIDE DOWN.

Remember, the can of 'Electronics Duster' ('Canned Air') MUST BE USED UPSIDE DOWN or it won't spray liquid.

You want liquid to come out as it's super cold and should immobilize the wasp. If you use the spray right side up it will just blow the wasp around and possibly get it mad.

Step 3: Spray the Wasp With Liquid Droplets

Get the tip of the spray tube as close as possible to the wasp. You may want to consider swapping out the plastic spray tube for a longer one from another product if you have one, to get the spray closer while keeping you farther away (Does it sound like I am paranoid of wasps?).

Squirt the wasp with droplets. Remember, keep the can upside down.

Hitting the wasp with droplets should immediately impair it and it should drop to the floor.

Don't squeeze the trigger too much and blast the wasp away. Previously practicing the right spray technique helps here.

A big blast can sometimes cool the wasp enough to slow it down, but better to hit it with droplets.

Step 4: Quickly Spray More Liquid on the Wasp

With the wasp down, and while keeping the can UPSIDE DOWN (Did I mention that enough times?), zero in on the wasp and spray more liquid on it. A couple of seconds of liquid (not blasting) should do it.

This will freeze the wasp solid and definitely kill it. No life returning from cryogenic storage here!

The wasp will stop, drop, and roll...over dead!

Drenching the wasp with liquid may create a white ring around the wasp. This is frost and will disappear as the surface around the wasp returns to room temperature.

Brrr, I feel cold already.

Step 5: Frozen Is DEAD

The wasp gets so cold that wisps of condensation fog can often be seen coming off of it.

It's really, really, REALLY frozen.

After a liquid 'bath' moisture will start to condense and freeze on the super cold wasp. The first photo (on the left) shows the wasp's wings have ice crystals on them. The second photo (a few seconds later) shows the wasp's wings thawing out (they are very thin) and the face frosting over. Brrr!

What's frozen is DEAD!

Congratulations, No more wasp. No poison spray. No residue.

Enjoy your newfound wasp extermination method!

.

P.S. Just a reminder: Avoid spraying liquid onto hot glass or other hot surfaces - the thermal shock of going from very hot to very cold may shatter the item. Don't spray people, on skin or on clothing. Liquid can cause instant frostbite (Duh, it killed the wasp.) Spray may be flammable. Keep away from ignition sources. Follow the safety instructions on the spray can (Oh, except for the part about not using the can upside down). Thanks and ENJOY!

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    90 Comments

    0
    mattkeaveney
    mattkeaveney

    1 year ago

    Or you know... since it's sitting on a door in once of your pictures, just like... open the door? Wasps control flies, caterpillars, spiders, and many other insect populations. They provide us with a free and eco-friendly natural pest control service, so next time just try to let them outside and do their job rather than killing them.

    0
    CristinaV22
    CristinaV22

    Reply 1 year ago

    You are mostly correct, but they also kill many beneficial insects and small animals. For me there aggressiveness tips the scales against them. Too many people get stung and blame it on bees.

    0
    mattkeaveney
    mattkeaveney

    Reply 1 year ago

    I don't believe I have ever heard of a wasp killing a small animal. They can be aggressive yes, if you chase them around trying to kill them with a freezing spray. The benefits outweigh the everything else.

    0
    CristinaV22
    CristinaV22

    Reply 1 year ago

    I have personally watched "German" wasps kill and carry off honey bees on trumpet vines at home. Ground wasps under my deck had killed a nest of baby chipmunks and were feeding on them when I poisoned and dug up the nest, the size half a basketball.
    Bald face hornets (a larger black body with white face) are a constant hazard. They go after fallen fruit and any bees that come near. I have found them digging into rotted wood, killing and carrying off centepeds and arthopods (pill bugs). The size of the nest I have seen is larger than two basketballs and they have killed chickens and scavenged road kill.

    0
    JosepAlAziz
    JosepAlAziz

    Reply 1 year ago

    Wasps are pest control until they get a pest themselves. And you forgot to mention they kill honeybees too.

    0
    wannabemadsci
    wannabemadsci

    Reply 1 year ago

    Door opens inwards and generally insects aren't great at figuring out how to go around a piece of glass. Had a bad wasp experience early in life so not predisposed to rescuing them.
    Thanks for the comment.

    0
    mattkeaveney
    mattkeaveney

    Reply 1 year ago

    You're still wrong but I appreciate the nice reply!

    0
    arjay67
    arjay67

    1 year ago

    I just grab the Windex. Works on houseflys, ants and other pests. And if you’re spraying near the windows just grab a paper towel and clean those while you’re at it.

    0
    wannabemadsci
    wannabemadsci

    Reply 1 year ago

    Great suggestion. Thanks for commenting!

    0
    SylvanB
    SylvanB

    1 year ago

    I used to have a cat that would eat yellowjackets. Was also a very friendly cat. Was fun watching her sit by the nest (a hole in the ground) for hours and catch the wasps coming and going. She would do that for a few days, and the nest would be dead.

    0
    wannabemadsci
    wannabemadsci

    Reply 1 year ago

    That is one amazing cat. I know mine prefers moths for a treat.
    Thanks for the post!

    0
    Nmtsaki
    Nmtsaki

    1 year ago on Step 5

    I have a bug vacuum that surprising works very well, even with wasps. I LOVE it! I just can’t find the recharging cord so may have to buy another one. I know it works and wasps very well, because I have tons of them coming in my front window! You just suck him up, and open the little tune up a outside. It also has a fairly long extension, so you can be quite a distance away from the critter. Spiders, flies, Hornets- safely placed outside, and no big murder on your head!!!

    Although, in a pinch, it’s nice to know there are other alternatives!!!

    0
    wannabemadsci
    wannabemadsci

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks for the bug vacuum idea!

    0
    bpark1000
    bpark1000

    Tip 1 year ago on Step 5

    I get wasps this way, without chemicals: get 1 foot ruler, stretch a rubber band around the ruler, parallel to its length, just below the measuring edge. Point ruler at wasp, and push the band off the back edge you are holding. The band will fly off and kill the wasp instantly! The aim is remarkable. It is fast enough to kill flies. Like the Instructable recommends, shoot parallel to the surface the wasp/fly is sitting on. Use heavy bands for larger insects.

    0
    wannabemadsci
    wannabemadsci

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks for the tip!

    0
    sparkchaser
    sparkchaser

    1 year ago

    Another option I use is hair spray (the more "firm hold" the better). Give them a good solid spray, then back off. It doesn't kill them but within 5-10 seconds the spray has set enough that they can't use their wings and can barely walk around.

    Once they're immobilized, you can easily kill or capture them without much danger of getting stung. Dump them outside under a plant, the spray weakens over time and they'll be back to normal in a few hours. The spray itself isn't harmful if you get some on yourself (that's what it's for after all), and any residue on surfaces wipes off with warm water. Plus, it's something you might already have on hand.

    Note this doesn't work as well on furry insects like bees. I'm assuming it's because they're accustomed to getting their hair done. It works best on the spindly insects with long, skinny wings (like wasps).

    0
    wannabemadsci
    wannabemadsci

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks for the suggestion!

    0
    EytanI
    EytanI

    1 year ago on Introduction

    Shoot them with salt instead. Safe, effective, cheap using harmless table salt.
    Check out Bug-a-salt

    0
    AzKiker
    AzKiker

    Reply 1 year ago

    bug-a-salt doesn't work on anything bigger than a fly. It doesn't kill lantern flies easily either. I use the electric racquets, but the ones without the safety mesh for maximum effect.

    0
    RigoC
    RigoC

    Reply 1 year ago

    I've seen those and they seem like fun, but who wants salt spread around the house?