Stackable Objects: CompFab Project 2

Introduction: Stackable Objects: CompFab Project 2

The second project for Computational Fabrication: Stackable Objects.

Using Rhino and Grasshopper, I followed the class tutorials step by step in order to understand transformations. I then started playing with form for my stackable objects by adjusting the curve to be revolved, wanting to create a vessel that entices the viewer to reach out and feel it, examining the surfaces with their palms to understand the tactile affordances of the shape. After I was satisfied with the form in rhino, I exported the file as an STL and used Cura to slice the object for printing. As the objects stand, they would take 10 hours to print. I had enough time for that, but I chose to cut down printing time by rescaling the model and compressing the objects in the y and z axes, which cut down printing time to 5 hours, which would give me enough time to reprint just in case the first print failed.

Step 1: Follow Tutorials

1. Tutorial for transforming and rescaling

2. Tutorial for creating multiple geometries with a for loop in python code

3. Stackable objects tutorial

These tutorials were fairly straightforward and intuitive. I understand how every aspect of the Python and Grasshopper code fit with what was displayed in Rhino.

Step 2: Adjusting the Input Curvature

After free-handing a couple of curves and trying out different iterations of my stackable forms, I landed on a final image that I was satisfied with. I wanted the form to afford tactile interaction with the surface of the shape. In order to elicit this, I gave the surface several unique curves, varying the thickness and proportion of the inside wall to the outside wall. I aesthetically enjoy the inside form, as it reminds me of the way a pot is shaped on the wheel. The tactile aspect of opening up a clay form was reminiscent in the Rhino making process as well as the printing process.

Step 3: 3D Print!

I exported the stackable forms to Cura and sliced the form. However, without modification, the print time was 10 hours. I adjusted the scale of the x, y, and z axes to cut the printing time to 5 hours, resulting in the final stackable model.

Printing, however, was a bit of a disaster. I am currently on print #3, as the first one failed for an unknown reason (I was away from the printer for a few minutes when it failed, so I couldn't see what happened) and the second one failed because the spool of filament got tangled during the printing process.

Update: Ran out of filament for my 3rd print! Paused it until I get my new filament in, then will continue the same print.

Update 2: Printed with wood-colored PLA filament, resulted in a successful and stackable print.

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    5 Comments

    0
    kobernik
    kobernik

    1 year ago

    Love the stacking form! The printed version, after your adjustments in Cura, reminds me of a sugar bowl lid. I would like to compose with a box of these stackers!

    1
    sambourgault
    sambourgault

    1 year ago

    The "fail" prints are very photogenic! I also had issues with the entanglement of my filament and had to manually redo the spool. I also began to manually straighten some length of the incoming filament before the print starts so it's not as curly when it gets pulled in by the motor. It seems to help 💁!

    0
    stejaraiulia
    stejaraiulia

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you Sam!!!

    0
    merttoka
    merttoka

    1 year ago

    @sambourgault is right, your failure looks awesome! Reminded me of Easter eggs :)

    Last week I tried printing a mask for grocery shopping but it broke half way. I later suspected that the filament was tangled and the extruder couldn't push the material to the nozzle. So I found this guide online (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2917932), printed and installed at the end of horizontal bar. It seems to be effective for tangled filament. Once you have the material delivered it definitely worth ~2 hours of print time.

    0
    soniahashim
    soniahashim

    1 year ago on Step 3

    These are so cool! I had a printing disaster too with tangled filament and was also trying to budget for not running out of material. You have such great spatial compositions -- I like the contrast between the interior shape and external curves. I also appreciate your sharing the unfinished prints -- I'm thinking more about the internal structure of the print and what ramifications it might have for usability / integrity and how that can be represented in a slicer. Thanks Stejara!