Sugru Basics and Tips

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Introduction: Sugru Basics and Tips

About: I am a computer programmer. I like to cook and make awesome things.

Because of the contest, I got my hands on some Sugru and it's pretty awesome. I've found a bunch of tips and basic instructions, but felt that they needed one place for newbies to read - especially the information that is useful to any project. I'm a newbie myself, so anything I find useful will be included. If anyone discovers any tips that I don't have listed, please comment and I'll add it to the Instructable.

The official website can be found here: sugru.com. You can buy it from the website and shipping is pretty cheap (a couple of bucks US) to anywhere because the packs are pretty small.

The technical data sheet is here: http://sugru.com/pdfs/FORMEROLsugru_TDS_OCT09.pdf

There is a plethora of information on this site: http://getsatisfaction.com/sugru/

And...here's their Facebook page: www.facebook.com

Step 1: What Is Sugru?

Sugru is awesome new stuff that seems to be able to do just about anything. It starts out like a modeling clay and turns into silicone after 24 hours. It will hold its shape but stay flexible and it bonds with almost anything.

It's waterproof and can withstand lots of temperatures (-60 °C to + 180 °C according to the website - that's -76°F to 356°F). That means when it's cured, you could use it in the snow and it can withstand boiling (but It's not food grade - don't use it on surfaces where it's going to touch food a lot)! Wow! It's also dishwasher-proof.

Is there anything this stuff can't do?

Step 2: Basic Instructions

Official instructions can be found here: http://sugru.com/instructions/
  1. Get your project ready. Once Sugru is open, it will begin to cure in about 30 minutes. If you're doing a small project, you might want to find something else to use it on if you have any left over. (I did 3 things with 1 (5g) piece!)
  2. Clean the surface - you want it to stick to the object, not dust or grease!!
  3. Wash your hands first.
  4. Cut open the Sugru along the dotted line. You can then peel the pack open.
  5. Smush the Sugru in your hands for about 30 seconds.
  6. Stick it on something and perform some feats of magic ;)
  7. Wash your hands (you'll want to - my hands got a little gross)
  8. Leave it to cure. They say a piece 3mm thick will take 24 hours (thicker takes longer, thinner takes less time).

Step 3: Tips and Ideas

SOAPY WATER will prevent anything from sticking. Oils will also prevent sticking, but might get messy. You can:
  • Dip something in soapy water before touching it to the Sugru to create a texture without getting stuck.
  • Wet your fingers with soapy water and then use your fingers to smooth out the Sugru for a nice smooth surface.
TEXTURES can also be achieved with these methods:
  • Another way to get it smooth is to press down with something smooth before it cures - glass or smooth aluminum foil would work.
  • Sand paper can be used on it after curing to get an eraser-type texture. I guess it doesn't work too well as an eraser though.
  • Get creative - something like a window screen might make a cool bumpy texture. I'd try the soapy water thing mentioned above.
  • The video here has a few examples. I included a picture below from the video.
TEMPERATURE makes a difference. It's suggested that you use Sugru at 21°C if possible (69.8°F). Warmer temperatures will cause the Sugru to cure faster, colder will make it take longer. Store uncured it in a cool place (the fridge is okay). It's also microwaveable once it's cured, but it might get hot in the microwave.

ELECTRICITY: Sugru is not conductive. This could be great in an electronic project.

CAUTIONS:
  • Sugru may leave a mark on surfaces or stain fabrics.
  • If necessary, Sugru can be removed by cutting off when cured.
  • Don’t use Sugru to stick up heavy objects.
  • Sugru isn’t suitable for use in direct or prolonged contact with food.
  • Keep out of reach of children.
  • Sugru isn't for use on surfaces that get a lot of wear (like the bottom of a shoe), it breaks down too easily.
ALLERGIES may exist. See their website for more information. If you think you might be allergic, you can still use Sugru - wear gloves while handling it and then when it cures you should be okay.

Step 4: Things It Won't Stick To

I'm hoping to keep this list updated as I (and others) find things that Sugru doesn't stick to.
  • Paper towels
  • Freezer paper
  • Brass
  • Polycarbonate
  • Polypropylene
  • Nylons
  • Saran Wrap (aka plastic wrap, cling wrap)
Also, note that on surfaces that get a lot of wear (i.e. the bottom of a shoe), Sugru won't last long.

Step 5: Colors

There are only four colors right now. I guess they're easier to manufacture than lighter colors, but it sounds like they are working on more. There is a guide here that shows how the current colors (black, orange, blue, and green) mix together.

Another awesome idea I saw here involves mixing glitter into the Sugru.

Apparently, you can make it glow in the dark! Check it out here.

I included pictures below of the things included in those links just in case the links ever break.

Sugru Contest

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Sugru Contest

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    38 Comments

    0
    LechNerd
    LechNerd

    3 months ago

    I’m on my second package. The first time I used it to fix a cracked handle on a built-in microwave and it’s barely visible and has lasted several years without any problem. The second time I accidentally snipped a wire on my pre-lit Christmas tree (aaaarrrgh!) and it’s remained perfectly in place for several years through setup and takedown (phew!). Just now I was setting up outdoor solar lights and I stepped on the wire and pulled it out of the solar charging panel (aaaargh again!). I took it apart and smooshed the wires back together and sealed with sugru and it’s good as new (phew again!). I’ve learned to purchase only the small packets now. Anything left over I put on the male end of my phone charging cables (you know, the part that always bends and fails). Great stuff!

    0
    MsMarly
    MsMarly

    Question 2 years ago

    Can you apply Sugru to Sugru as in a second application when first wasn't thick enough?

    0
    ferris209
    ferris209

    Question 3 years ago

    Can you cut, shape, or "whittle" it after it cures?

    0
    Tamaresque
    Tamaresque

    7 years ago on Introduction

    It's wonderful stuff. So far I've used it to repair the edge of some shoes where the stitching was coming adrift; to make some pads on a magnetic dryer rack which was scratching the dryer; to re-attach a shelf to the top of my TV when the rubber pads on the original feet came adrift; and to fix a clothes-drying rack which had previously been repaired with gaffer tape (which just didn't do it). I have some in the fridge now, waiting for the next project which will be to repair some decorative pottery, Kintsugi-style, only in black. :-)

    0
    townsend1212
    townsend1212

    8 years ago on Introduction

    SOMEWHERE I READ THAT THE FINISH WAS A LITTLE DIFFICULT TO SMOOTH OUT. WELL THE FIRST THING I DID WAS TO WORK ON MY NEW PHONE. AT FIRST I HAD A LITTLE TROUBLE WITH FORMING IT AND THEN IT ALL CAME TOGETHER. TO MAKE A VERY SMOOTH FINISH I STROKED IT SOFTLY AND WALA VERY SMOOTH FINISH, ALMOST SHINNY. I USED MY FINGER NAIL TO MAKE THE EDGES, EVEN AND TRIED TO MAKE SOME LINES FOR TEXTURE THEAT WAS A LITTLE TRICKY BUT I CAN SEE IT WORKING OUT WELL IF SETTING HAS BEGUN TO TAKE PLACE. THIS IS A WONDER OF A SUBSTANCE. SORRY TO HEAR THAT IT IS NOT FOOD QUALITY I WANT TO MAKE A SPECIAL MOUTHPIECE FOR MY NEW E-CIGAR. WELL HAPPY SUGRU-ING.

    0
    jen7714
    jen7714

    10 years ago on Introduction

    You should probably add that Sugru can't be used on surfaces that have to stand a lot of wear. So you can't use it on the bottom of shoes and such (which really stinks because I had a awesome idea but now I can't since I found that out).

    0
    jwystup
    jwystup

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    Done, I added it to the "cautions" and as a note after I list what it won't stick to. I had the same problem when I found out it isn't food-grade silicon when cured :( I really wanted some silicon tipped tongs!! But it's still new, we can hope they'll come out with some new features :)

    0
    mwfaniej
    mwfaniej

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    Please what is sugru?
    we in south africa might have another name for it
    thanks Fanie

    0
    jwystup
    jwystup

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    It's a new product, unique to the company that sells it. It starts out kinda like modeling clay and it hardens into a flexible silicone. It sticks to almost anything (with the exception of a few metals and plastics). Check out their website at sugru.com, they have a lot of examples of what you can do with it!

    0
    mwfaniej
    mwfaniej

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    Thanks for the quick response and explanation
    regards Fanie

    0
    hanlie
    hanlie

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    Hey Fanie

    I live in Cape Town and ordered mine online, quite cheap but it took about 10 days to get here. It's amazing stuff though, get some and start playing.

    0
    monkey_uk
    monkey_uk

    10 years ago on Step 4

    I've found that Sugru will stick to almost any plastic, but sometimes you need to roughen the surface of the plastic with some sandpaper first. Failing that, if for any reason it falls off, a bit of superglue can hold it in place.

    0
    angelabchua
    angelabchua

    10 years ago on Introduction

    Question.... I used sugru and a paper clip to replace the zipper pull on my jacket. Well now it comes time to wash said jacket. How will the sugru fare in the washer and the heat from the dryer?

    0
    paperclip32
    paperclip32

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    The sugru will fare fine.It's waterproof and heat resistant up to 180 deg. C.The paperclip on the otherhand,may not fare as well.

    0
    wiredcur
    wiredcur

    10 years ago on Step 3

    Thanks for the Sugru primer. I'm looking to make a male-plug on the DC-side of a power supply but the only mold I have is the actual female side on my camera. I'm not really ready to put soapy water or oil on my camera. Have you found any other stuff that Sugru doesn't stick to?

    Thank

    0
    jwystup
    jwystup

    Reply 10 years ago on Step 3

    Plastic wrap! I used it in a similar situation, it peels right off!

    0
    Shesu
    Shesu

    10 years ago on Introduction

    Hmm, sounds similar to the rubber stuff you can dip tools into, except this stuff you can mold into the shape you want.

    I don't suppose you can mix it with something so it cures a little stiffer? I have a project where I used a 2-part epoxy clay, but it cured too hard, and I'm afraid this stuff might be too soft.