The Simple and Elegant Hammock Stand

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Introduction: The Simple and Elegant Hammock Stand

About: I am an engineer by trade and a creator at heart.

It is the season for being outside and what better way to enjoy this time than in your favorite hammock. Unfortunately for some of us no viable trees are around to help. Therefore we must build. The following is a simple but elegant hammock stand.

This hammock stand is designed for the eyelets to be 11 ft apart and 45 inches from the ground. If you need longer you can either drill the eyelet holes further along the arms or use longer boards for the center base (2x6). If you need shorter you can use shorter boards in the middle or use extensions from the hooks. i.e. chain, rope or hammock mounting straps. The arms can easily be removed for storage if desired or if your hammock of choice changes through the years.

To help with this build I have provided some templates for marking where to drill the main holes that hold the arms in place. I have also provided an arc template if you want to change the aesthetic of the legs. To ensure the templates printed correctly overlay the base and arm templates and align the drill locations. They should match.

Supplies

The main material is dimensional lumber from your local home improvement store. Depending on the location of the stand pressure treated lumber may be your best option but cedar and untreated lumber can also work.

Lumber

2x - 2x8 by 4 ft

2x - 2x6 by 6 ft

2x - 4x4 by 5.5 ft

2x - 2x4 by 8-9 inches or off cut 4x4

Hardware

4x - 1/2" Bolts - 8" long

2x -1/2" threaded eye bolts (the hammock will attach to these, ensure they are long enough to go through the 4x4.

6x - 1/2" lock nuts

8x - 1/2" fender washers

12x - 3" screws (use correct type if using pressure treated lumber)

8x - 2 5/8" or 3" screws (use correct type if using pressure treated lumber)

Tools

This project can be done with a wide variety of tools. The most important aspect is you need to be able to cut and drill square to the boards. The rest is not vitally important due to the provided templates. What I used is in no particular order below.

-Personal Protective Equipment - Safety Glasses, Hearing Protection, Dust Mask

-Chop saw/Miter saw

-Cordless drill

-Cordless Impact driver

-Two adjustable wrenches

-Socket Set

-Tape Measure

-Pencil

-5/8" Spade Bit

-1/2" Spade Bit

-Drill bit to pre-drill holes for screws

-Clamps can be handy or a second set of hands at times.

-Carpenter or framing square

-The provided Templates

-Scissors

Optional Tools

-Jigsaw to make the legs a little nicer with a curve

-Sandpaper

-Some type of finish - You can finish this just like a wooden deck

-Hacksaw or angle grinder if the bolts are too long.

Step 1: The Build

Now for the fun part. Depending on what length you are starting with cut to the lengths above. There are two base boards (2x6 by 6ft) and they need to be exactly the same length to ensure a strong stand. The rest of the lengths are not as important.

We will now use the provided templates to mark the main holes that will hold the arms in place. Cut out the Templates as shown. Use something with a sharp point to make a mark through the paper template for each hole location. I used the point of one of the spade bits (not in the drill) to make a mark. The Arm template will be used once per arm (4x4). The Base Template will be used twice per board, once for each end. The end should be mirrored from each other so flip the template over the side that says "Board continues this way". Take a look at the Assembly pictures if you need clarification on orientation of the holes. It is important when drilling the holes to ensure they are perpendicular to the surface. This will allow everything to go together. Drill the holes with a 5/8" spade bit or equivalent bit all the way through the boards. Using the templates you can drill one board at a time.

The next set of holes to drill are for the eye bolts. These will be 5 ft from the ends the templates were used on, and on one of the faces with no holes. Mark the center of the boards and drill with a 1/2 inch bit all the way through. Repeat with the other arm.

We can now cut the ends of the arms to the 45 degree bevel as shown on the template. Cut the template to expose the wood, mark the board and make the cut. This cut does not have to be very precise just error on the side of longer is a little better.

The opposite end of the arms can be left with the original cut or you can mount a solar light to the end by cutting at 22.5 degrees and using the off cut to make the end parallel to the ground as shown in the pictures.

You can add the eye bolts now and fasten the nuts. The eye needs to be on the longer side of the arm. [Note: depending on the length of the eye bolt a lock nut may not work and a regular nut will need to be used. If the eye bolt is very long the excess threaded end of the bolt can be cut off with a hack saw or angle grinder. If the hammock you are using needs a hook rather than an eye the hack saw can be used to remove a portion of the eye to make a hook. Be careful to not remove too much causing the hammock to slip off the hook.]

If you are opting to make the ends of the legs (2x4 by 4ft) fancy with the curve feel free to use the provided template and cut out with a jigsaw or other equally appropriate device. If you want to do something else, the world is your oyster.

Step 2: The Assembly

This is a great time to apply any desired finish to all the lumber. You can do it later but then it is like finishing a deck and most people do not enjoy that.

We will begin by attaching the two short lengths of 2x4 or chunk of 4x4. These are to help stiffen the base and act as spacers. Their placement is not crucial. I put mine about 24" in from the ends of the base boards but the exact location does not really matter. Place them at an angle so they do not stick out. Only attach them to one base board for now with 2 5/8" or 3" screws. Two screws per chunk per side is plenty.

We are going to assemble the rest of the base upside down. This is so gravity can work in our favor. The finished stand has a gap under the center base boards to help with stability on lumpy ground. Flip the legs(2x8) upside down if they have arcs on the ends and flip the two base boards and two legs upside down (see pictures for orientation).Move the two legs so the baseboards are centered on them. The baseboards should have 2x4's between them. Ensure the baseboards are both in contact with the leg and square to each other. Drill three holes per baseboard end and screw the legs to the baseboard with the 3" screws. This will use 6 screws per leg, 12 total. {Note: the boards you are screwing into are not as tall as the legs. Bias the holes toward the ground as shown in the pictures. Also be careful to not squeeze the free ends of the baseboards together. If this happens the arms may not fit. A chunk of 4x4 can be used to ensure proper spacing in maintained. Once this is complete screw to the other base board as well.]

Now we can add the arms. Flip the base back over. The cut surface from the 45 degree on the arms will be facing the ground. This will orient the eye bolts so they are facing each other. Take the long bolts and add a fender washer. Start one in a hole. Align the arm (a second person may be helpful) and slide the bolt through. Repeat with the remaing bolt and the other arm. Add a washer to the exposed bolt ends and apply the lock nuts. They do not need to be super tight, just snug to the washer.

Step 3: Enjoy!!

You now have a hammock stand. Add the hammock of your choice and enjoy some well earned rest. One final note, the stand will creak the first time you use it. This is the arms shifting toward each other when you apply weight to the hammock. Typically they will stay in this position after some minor initial adjustment. Now go enjoy that hammock!

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21 Comments

0
jerome.rancourt
jerome.rancourt

1 year ago

What would be the maximum weight the hammock could support ?

0
jd2012143
jd2012143

1 year ago on Step 2

Hello,
I like the stand. It looks so easy to build. I will be trying to make it this week-end. Great instructions!

0
misterxp
misterxp

2 years ago

Good instructable. You are very patient with your replies. Well done 😉. Bought the hammock and will make next week.! Surely the kids will ague over it! I think to put wheels on it too.

1
Miller Industries
Miller Industries

Reply 2 years ago

Thank you Misterxp, good luck with your build. I like your idea of adding wheels to help move it around. Are you going to put the wheels on one end so the base will sit on the ground when you are using it and the wheels will touch when it is tipped up to move like in the picture below or do something else?

Hammock Stand Wheel Set.JPG
0
misterxp
misterxp

Reply 2 years ago

Hello Miller Industries. Yes I thought to do something like that. I need to buy a couple of pieces of timber but hope to make it soon. Not sure how to fix the wheels yet but I have various sizes to try. Will send pictures when it is done!

0
skowron2535
skowron2535

Question 2 years ago on Step 2

Hello,
I have a question about the size of the boards.
How thick are they?
0
Miller Industries
Miller Industries

Answer 2 years ago

Hello skowron2535,
The material used is dimensional lumber in the United States. The thickness for the base pieces is 1.5 inches, this applies to the 2x4's, 2x6's and 2x8's. The arms are 3.5 inches.thick for the 4x4's. All units are English.

0
edsamuels
edsamuels

2 years ago

hi, great instructions, im in the middle of building it now... the only issue ive had is that the arc template for the 2x8 arcs is not showing the arc!! don't know how to make that shape manually, any other ideas? HELP! lol

arc screenshot.jpg
0
Miller Industries
Miller Industries

Reply 2 years ago

Hi Edsamuels,
I am sorry the template is not working for you. You may want to try a different internet browser to see if that helps. To manually create the arc I traced the top rim on a 5 gallon bucket for my original hammock stand as seen below. It is close enough in size to work. I would recommend tracing the curve and making sure you like how it looks before cutting. You can always blend the cut curve with sandpaper if it is a little off. If you don't have a bucket you can trace an arc with a nail, a piece of string and a pencil for a makeshift compass. You do not need to drive the nail in, just use the point to keep it from slipping. Good luck!

IMG_5651.JPG
0
cspann560
cspann560

2 years ago

About 13 years ago I planted a maple sapling in my back yard with the hope that I would live long enough to sit in its shade. Today it is a 25 foot high beauty and I am proud of it, However, if I were smart back then I would have planted a second one about 15 ft away. For the past 3-4 years I have been looking here in Instructabes and other places online for some ingenious means to hold up the other of my rope hammock. Wooden solutions were my first choice because most of my tools are in that craft but I doubted how strong and durable a wooden frame could be. This instructable has me convinced though. At least to the point of building a full scale frame which later I can use as a prototype for a welded steel contraption. Thanks for a simple and easy solution!

0
Miller Industries
Miller Industries

Reply 2 years ago

Hi cfs0527, I am glad this Instructable has been helpful on your quest to relax in the shade. Good luck with your project!

0
tony.gailandtony
tony.gailandtony

Question 2 years ago on Introduction

Can you supply the instructions on how to make up the cloth to fit the hanging space with details of how much is needed. I am sorry to ask this,but I am 74years old on wednesday so any help would be appreciated. Thanking you in advance

0
Miller Industries
Miller Industries

Answer 2 years ago

Hi Tony.gailandtony, thank you for viewing my Instructable. The two hammocks pictured were both purchased so I do not have directions on how to make them. There are other Instructables on how to make similar hammocks or you can purchase a hammock. Good luck and Happy Birthday!

0
sangeniti
sangeniti

2 years ago

Sorry but are you sure of the measurements? should I buy a 13 foot hammock ??

1
Miller Industries
Miller Industries

Reply 2 years ago

Hi Sangeniti, I am sure of my measurements. The provided dimensions are for an 11 foot long hammock. The stand itself will be longer than the hammock. LeslieGeee has made an excellent suggestion when purchasing or making a hammock. Good Luck and Enjoy!

2
LeslieGeee
LeslieGeee

Reply 2 years ago

Sangeniti, If you make this stand bring the measurement from hook to hook to where you will be buying your hammock they will help you to find a hammock that will fit the space. If buying online you can contact the seller for help. You have to remember that hammocks come in different widths and lengths depending on the hanging apparatus used on the hammock. You can even make your own hammock. Just use Google or whatever browser you have to look for the info you need. Good Luck!

1
BKLaRue
BKLaRue

2 years ago

Super cool!! I'm actually going to try this in the coming weeks. I'll post pictures when it's done! Thanks for posting it!

1
LeslieGeee
LeslieGeee

2 years ago

Well done, thank you for sharing your instructions :)

0
Penolopy Bulnick
Penolopy Bulnick

2 years ago

Very nice hammock stand and very organized directions :)