Portable Soup Kitchen

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Introduction: Portable Soup Kitchen

About: Hi! My name is Hans, I live in Scandinavia where I build whatever pops up in my head, out on to my sketchbook and finally into my hands. My projects here are my favorites and I hope some might inspire you. Rem…

Another box project from leftovers in my workshop. The sketch was made so I knew what was needed to make this a fully portable soup kitchen. I wanted it all to fit in and around the box. I got the stove a while back and it has just been sitting there waiting for me… it's got my name on it!

I started cutting the box into 3 pieces and mad it a foldable design, the hinges were cut off from an earlier project. I just rounded the edges with a file and the were perfect.

Supplies

Since this is a scrap project, from the build to cooking soup, you should take what you have leftover and put it to use in your own unique way. But I would really love to see your take on a portable kitchen.

I've used pretty simple tools, I used a router for making the boiler/lid fit on the back of the box. Other than that I used nails, glue and a jigsaw + +

Step 1: Scraps Bonanza!

For some, it might be a mess/trash, but me… I can't do without scarps and leftovers. I have boxes, drawers, and bags full of pieces that someday might come in useful. Cutaways from woodworking projects, metal pieces, leather scraps, bits of wire, the list goes on.

Step 2: Contents of a Soup Kitchen

In the video, you can see me putting the box together and making soup at the same time (blow torch used to speed up the stove). This was for me a test to see proof of concept. From there on much has been added and tested.

I knew I wanted to serve two people, so I could not just eat out of the boiler! I laid everything out to get an overview and see where I could put everything.

  1. Stove
  2. Pot
  3. Knife
  4. Soup ladle
  5. Bowl X2
  6. Soupspoon X2
  7. Electrical cord
  8. Veggie shaver
  9. Cutting board
  10. Box for all of it

Step 3: Make Soup - Not War

Why Soup? Don't get me started, I love soup! I've got a project running involving food scraps, making sure we start using our leftovers and cut the food waste. So Soupr has a goal of making leftover soup recipes available to the whole world. And everyone is invited to join and share their favorite soup stories and recipes:-)

Making a soup kitchen is one way of showing my love for this great meal. I will be traveling around and making soup on whatever I can find in people's fridges.

Step 4: I Made My First Knife!

A beat-up ruler gets a second life… I've been wanting to make a knife for a while now, but here I found the perfect blade with some milage. I cut it with my angle grinder and sanded it down to what I thought was a cool Japanese inspired knife blade (without the razor-sharp edge:-). Sure enough, I had some leftover turned piece that would be a perfect handle. I measured and drilled two holes and then glued it all up with epoxy, when hardened, I sanded it down again. Placing the knife on the outside of the box a used a piece of leather that I soaked and formed around the knife pocket.

All ready to assemble!

Step 5: Salt'n Pepper and More…

Turned out there were a lot of smaller things that had to be added and fixed for the kitchen to be ready for cooking. The orange piece in front folds out and holds the stove straight. The power cord can be pulled out through a small hatch. To easily get the cutting board off I drilled a hole for my finger pull it out.

I bent two metal parts to keep the stove in place, as I screw the plates down they tighten the stove to its position. Important to have it fold up without catching the small inlay box.

For all my projects I add graphic details as the last step, kind of like putting permanent makeup on.

Step 6: Can Opener

I've got a stack of bamboo that I've turned into handles, legs, and decor for other builds. I was missing a can opener so that was the next mini-project. A piece of 1mm metal would be the locking mechanism. I hammered it all in place and glued the opener to the handle. A pipe tightener kept the handle from splitting when inserting the metal.

Step 7: A Not So Secret Compartment…

What's inside? Well, let's open it… ooohhhh there is a light that turns on automatically! But wait there is more….

A spring holds 2 drinking glasses in place.

An insert for herbs and Tabasco to save any soup chef in dispair.

The inside of the door has 4 shelves for meat, fish, chicken, and vegetable broth.
Broth shelves on thingiverse: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4356457

And last but not least, a snaps bottle, a few droplets of Swedish snaps is a great way to end a soup dinner.

Step 8: Adjustments…

To make this soup kitchen fully portable I have a methylated spirit burner that fits where the cooking stove is now. You never know someday you might go off-grid:-)

I also put the soup ladle on the side to fully open the box up. I cut two pieces at 30 degrees on the outside and 15 degrees on the inside, enough for the spoon handle to slide in.

Now I'm ready to give others a taste!

Step 9: A Soupr Soup Kitchen

I'm soupr happy with this project and can't wait to bring the love for soup to the masses:-) I'd be really happy if you tag along.

For updates check out my Instagram flow here: https://www.instagram.com/smogdog

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    21 Comments

    0
    ChristelE
    ChristelE

    1 year ago

    Hello. Nice to see you her with that fun invention. Med vennlig hilsen Christel

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hei Christel! Så meldingen din først nå:-) Takker og bukker!

    0
    wafflebeaver
    wafflebeaver

    1 year ago on Step 9

    Great project and very cool. The little details are really interesting and can be used for much more than just soup utensils. Thanks for sharing.

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks a bunch! I agree, this project will feed new projects:-D

    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    1 year ago

    It's impressive how much you fit in there!

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks Nicole! It was a bit of a jigsaw puzzle:-)

    0
    ChristelE
    ChristelE

    1 year ago

    Nice to see this project here. Mvh Christel

    0
    KnittersSerendipity

    Perfect for a camping, going to a park. Make a meal of soup to share.

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Right! I'll make you a bowl if you ever pass through Fredrikstad:-D

    0
    Marve48
    Marve48

    1 year ago

    Love your project, Very creative . Well done. My hat is off to you!

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you so much! Had a great time making it:-)

    1
    maxman
    maxman

    1 year ago

    Love it!

    Where do you use yours? If I'm around electricity I'll take a small crockpot with me.

    I have something similar. I keep my propane stove, a nesting pot and pan, and spoon and fork in a plastic kitty litter bucket. Mine's totally portable/off grid. Last time out I felt the need for a wind screen. I thought about building a plywood box to replace the plastic one. Instead, I think I'll stay with what I've got and add some kind of wind deflector. That seems simpler, and I try to be simple. It comes naturally.

    0
    r14290
    r14290

    Reply 1 year ago

    Add some thin panels that fit inside the bucket with some way to connect them together and maybe to the bucket. That could solve wind issue

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hey, good tip! Wind is always an issue here in Norway when cooing outside:-)

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks!!! I've just finished this so there has only been one meal cooked so far. Since uploading, I've made an off-grid solution with an old methylated spirit camping stove. I've got a steel ring as a windbreaker, but I need to add some holes for oxygen intake. I'll be taking this on the road this summer:-)

    0
    srilyk
    srilyk

    1 year ago

    I dig it! I love the "rough" aesthetic to it... this box looks like it's been around and has seen some meals :)

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    Yeayh! Thanks! I'm fortunate enough that this field of aesthetics hides or even highlights the roughness of my finish:-) Coffee paint does the job too!

    0
    Hey Jude
    Hey Jude

    1 year ago

    Nick Park would be proud.

    0
    smogdog
    smogdog

    Reply 1 year ago

    I love Nick Park! Thanks for noticing:-)
    I'll invite Wallace for lunch!