UV Curing Station

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Introduction: UV Curing Station

About: i love to make robotics in my spare time

UV curing station, a great tool for your resin 3D printer.

Step 1: About This Project:

For a while now i have a resin 3D printer, and i always had a problem with after curing of the 3D prints.

Normaly i only printed when the sky was clear so i could cure the 3d prints in the sun. But i live in the Netherlands so it's more rain then sun. So i decided to make a uv curing box for my resin prints. Maybe you also have problems with curing your 3d prints, or you just want a cleaner solution. Well i hope this may be something for you, just like this is a great solution for me.

Warning!
too much uv light can be dangerous. Only turn the station on when de door is closed. See for more information this link:
https://www.who.int/uv/publications/en/occupationa...


I also participate in the Build a tool contest so if you would be so kind to vote for me, that would be very appreciated

Step 2: What Do You Need

You need some stuff to create this project:

Tools:

* Laser cutter (or a company/makerspace that can cut it for you)
* 3D printer
* Soldering iron

Material

* UV led strip 3M 12V€ 7,20 (https://bit.ly/3jgzYpb)

* Motor DC€ 2,37 (https://bit.ly/32rspW7)

* Powersupply connector € 0,68 (https://bit.ly/32qUCfD)

* Powersupply 12V 3A € 4,31 (https://bit.ly/32tq90n)

* Acrylic normal 31x21cm (red 4x, black 3x, clear 1x )

* Acrylic mirror 31x21cm
(for dutch people i can reccomend this site for the acrylic: https://bit.ly/34wVmT7)

* GLUE (i used pvc glue but other glue's would also be fine)

* Superglue

* 3D models en DXF files can be found on: (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4580505)

* Wires

* 10k and 1k resistor

* 9X m3x10

* 2X m3x16

* 3X m3x20

* 1X m4x20

* 12X m3 nuts

* 1X m4 locknut

For the people that don't like instructions, i made a small video that you can look at (see video above), but that doesn't explaine were the screws need to be or how i did the electronics. For that i would atleast to look at step 18 ;)

Step 3: Construction: Step 1

Glue The UV back and The UV middle together like in the picture.
The holes need to point to the UV back.

Step 4: Construction: Step 3

First glue the right side to the frame. After the glue is dry you can glue the left side on the frame.

Step 5: Construction: Step 4

Now glue the UV top on the frame.

Step 6: Construction: Step 5

Now glue the UV mirror back on the backside.
NOTE: i would not recommend this with pvc glue because the mirror can get dim & ugly.

Step 7: Construction: Step 6

Next glue the UV mirror side's to the inside.

Step 8: Construction: Step 7

Next glue the UV mirror top on the inside of the top.

Step 9: Construction: Step 8

Cut the UV led strip in the right measurements:
4x 200mm 2x 320mm
Solder on all the strips a red (+) and black (-) wire.

Step 10: Construction: Step 9

Now paste the UV ledstrips on the mirror side, past the 2 longer ones on the back and over the top plate of the mirror
There are holes on the underside were you can put the wires trough.

Step 11: Construction: Step 10

Put the UV motor holder over the motor an put it in the hole for the motor in the frame.
Screw it tight with 2x m3x20 and 2x m3 bolts and 1x m3x10.

Step 12: Construction: Step 11

Next glue the Uv rotator tight on the rotating rod of the motor with second glue, make sure there is a little gap between the UV rotator and the acrylic frame.
After that glue the UV roundisk to the motor rod and the UV rotator.

Step 13: Construction: Step 12

Put a m3x16 screw between Hinge_1 & Hinge_2 (do this on both ofcourse).

Step 14: Construction: Step 13

Screw the hinges to the UV front and the door with 8x m3x10mm and 8 m3 nuts.

Step 15: Construction: Step 14

Screw lock_2 on the left side with a m3x20mm and a m3 bolt.
Screw lock_1 on the right side with a m4x20mm and a m4 locknut.

Step 16: Construction: Step 15

You can now glue the front part (with the door) to the frame

Step 17: Construction: Step 16

Screw the powersupply connector in the hole on the backside.

Step 18: Construction: Step 17 (electronics)

I made for the wiring a schematic (yes it's made in paint nothing fancy) for how i made the electronics.
Feel free to make it however you like, if you have a better idea. But this works great voor me.
The voltage devider brings the 12V to 6V for the motor.
See the pictures for a better sight of how i made it.

Step 19: Construction: Step 18

Glue the UV bottom part tight.

Step 20: Done!

Put the adapter in the outlet and you are ready to go!

Now you have a fully working UV curing Station. So you don't have to worry about the time, when you can 3D print with the resin printer.
From my experience it takes about 10 minutes to fully cure a resin print. I do recomend that you also turn the print half way, so the underside also will cure well.

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    22 Comments

    0
    KevinM597
    KevinM597

    Question 8 months ago

    Hello, I was wondering how this would work scaled up to cure a bigger? I’m working on a project for my schools manufacturing tech class and it’s quite a big print. Also I have very little knowledge about curing and am wondering what it is? Thank you

    0
    kmpres
    kmpres

    9 months ago

    Nicely done project! I like the construction using CNC cut sides - makes for a very professional looking enclosure. A few comments, if I may:
    First, you say that a 1K to 10K voltage divider will produce 6V if 12V is fed to the ends? By my math, that will produce 10.9V. The formula is Vout = (Vsource x R2) divided by (R1 + R2). Numerous online calculators will confirm this.
    Also, I agree with other commenters about the safety issues with UV light so perhaps adding springs to the door hinges will keep the UV light in the box except during short inspections. Also, a micro-switch added to the door to turn the UV LEDs off whenever the door is opened will prevent any exposure.
    The greater safety hazard, in my opinion, is the use of UV curing resin to begin with. As anyone who owns a UV printer should know, but many who don't own one may not know, you don't want to get the resin on your skin. It is difficult to remove, and when sunlight hits it, it cures in your pores - definitely not a good thing. Care should be taken at all times when handling the stuff.

    4
    frarugi87
    frarugi87

    Reply 9 months ago

    Just a comment on the divider: your assumption is correct when there is nothing in parallel to the 10k resistor. But if the motor has an equivalent resistance of, for instance, 1.1k when rotating, then the total resistance will be 10k // 1.1k = 1k, which then translates to 6V on the motor. A very poor way to step down the voltage, of course, but still working

    0
    tonyi
    tonyi

    Reply 9 months ago

    Well done Douwe1230, thanks for documenting & sharing.

    Frarugi87, yes well explained, so i also picked up on this. as i don't know what power rating this motor draws when loaded, but the the correct (or over rated) resistor power rating will have to be selected so as to not burn them out during normal prolonged operation.May be worth noting how hot they get during normal operation or measure the current flow through them to see how close to their rated value the are working at.

    0
    kmpres
    kmpres

    Reply 9 months ago

    An excellent explanation. I had thought that the motor would load the circuit down some but was thinking in terms of current drawn from the power supply. The equivalent resistance concept makes it so much clearer, thank you.

    0
    KISELIN
    KISELIN

    9 months ago

    Nice job! May I point out a couple of things? The Voltage divider wan't give 6V with those resistors 10K and 1K? They should be equal, like 1K &1K.
    With 1K Your motor will draw ( I = U/R) => 6V/1000ohm. = 0,006A. I don't think so?
    Say, the motor takes 100mA (0,1A) the resistors ought to be R=U/I => 6V/0,1A = 60R
    Now if the Resistor is 60R the power loss over it will P=U*I (P=Watt)
    So, P=6*0,1 => P= 0,6W. (they can be a bit HOT). Yes?
    You absolutely should have some kind'f a timer on this!
    What happens if the cure goes on for a long UV-time? (I don't know?)
    Again nice job anyway. Cheers!

    0
    douwe1230
    douwe1230

    Reply 9 months ago

    Hello Kiselin, thank you for your coment. i didnd took long to take te calculation. i draw this and build this in one complete day. When it was done is messured the tempeture for a few hours and it stayed under the 50 degrees. So i dind feel the need to change it. But yea maybe it was smarter to use lower resistors. also a timer is a smart idea. im planning to use a smart wall switch so i can control it with voice recognition.
    Feel free to kake it however you like it ;)

    0
    douwe1230
    douwe1230

    Answer 9 months ago

    Strange for me does the link work just fine. The uv leds i used were 395-405nm

    1
    lordofthedum
    lordofthedum

    Tip 9 months ago

    Looks great, i much better than mine, but then again, mine is hella ghetto!

    MVIMG_20200913_155113.jpg
    0
    ventifact
    ventifact

    9 months ago

    I'm disturbed that there are no warnings of the dangers of UV light in your instructable, no UV warning decals on the device and the door does not look light tight.

    0
    douwe1230
    douwe1230

    Reply 9 months ago

    Great reaction ventifact,
    i never stood still about that, maybe that was because people normally also know the dangers of UV light that comes with a resin printer. I can't do much about the door, otherwise the door won't open and close. but I did add a warning about uv light to step 1.

    0
    ChuckF9
    ChuckF9

    Reply 9 months ago

    The wavelength of UV that is used to cure SLA prints (405nm) and the intensity of these LED strip lights aren't harmful to humans at short exposure.

    0
    ChrisWx
    ChrisWx

    9 months ago

    How fast does it cure? Faster or slower than sunlight? About the same? Just curious how that wavelength of light works on the resin.

    0
    douwe1230
    douwe1230

    Reply 9 months ago

    out of experians i would say the 3d model cures in 10 a 20 minuts. if i would put the 3d model in the sun it took me mostly one day to cure a 3d model.

    0
    jwilliamsen
    jwilliamsen

    9 months ago

    Very cool. Do you think you could add some UV strips under the turntable to help cure the bottom of the piece - or would the acrylic block too much of the UV light?

    0
    douwe1230
    douwe1230

    Reply 9 months ago

    You can do that but i don't think it is nessusary, because the mirrors brings the uv light alla round the model. What you could do is turn the model 180 degrees afther 5 a 7 minuts.

    2
    tercero
    tercero

    9 months ago

    Nice.
    How do you like the resin printer?
    I purchased a AnyCubic X series a couple of months back and like it. I was wondering if the resin printer was worth the money.

    0
    douwe1230
    douwe1230

    Reply 9 months ago

    I have a wanhao duplicator 7. (als ofcourse normal 3d printers)
    I like the resin printer a lot, but it is not something you will use for all parts that you want to 3D print.
    It takes alot of time to print something and even more work before you can use is (celaning the 3d model curing it cleaning the 3d printer etc)
    For small precise parts it is really perfect. but if you want to print big parts with not special forms you could better use the normal printer.
    I can only recoment a resin printer next to a normal 3d printer, because if you use them together the possibilities only gets bigger

    0
    tercero
    tercero

    Reply 9 months ago

    Thanks for getting back to me douwe1230. I'm looking at a new Anycubic Mono X. I like the Elegoo Saturn, but from the reviews the Mono X is superior. I guess I'll go that route.
    I've been educating myself on the use of a resin printer. Wow, talk about a lot of pre and post work. Not for the faint of heart or the casual printer.