Viking Stargazing Chairs

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Introduction: Viking Stargazing Chairs

About: I love learning, and experiencing new things. I like to document what i'm learning. I am a keen photographer, love cooking, art and everything in between. Keep an eye out for weekly videos.

I was really excited to start building these, and they are more comfortable than i expected.

First of all you need 2 lengths of board. Scaffold Board will do the job.

You will need the following tools

Jigsaw

Circular Saw or Hand Saw.

Sanding Paper, 80 and 120 grit and an orbital sander if possible.

A drill with a large wood bit

Step 1: Cut the Boards to Length

I found that cutting the boards to 49" in length worked well

Do this with the circular saw, or hand saw.

Step 2: Measure and Cut the Boards

Get one of the boards and put a line 14" from the bottom of the board. This will make your seat.

At the 14" mark measure in 2" from either side and mark a line all the way to the other end.

You are best cutting this with a circular saw then, the jigsaw for the small fiddly cuts.

This will create the tenon.

To create the mortice pocket.

Take the other length of wood and measure 14" from the bottom of the board and mark a line all the way across.

Measure 2" in from either side and mark two lines there.

find out the thickness of the boards and take that measurement. From the 14" line you have made, make another line using the thickness measurement of the board. This should give you a rectangle that needs cutting out.

Use a drill and large wood bit in each corner to give you some space to get in with the jigsaw. Cut that hole out.

Step 3: Sometimes You Need to Fettle It a Bit

Even with good measurements, sometimes the mortice pocket can be a bit tight.

Keep cutting it out little by little until you have a snug, but easy to insert the other board fit.

Step 4: Make Them Look Nice.

Now with the jigsaw, round the edges of the seat board for a more comfortable fit.

You can also use the jigsaw to cut a design or shape into the headrest.

You can elaborate in a lot of ways here to customise the look to your liking.

Step 5: Sand and Finish

Now sand them to your liking and feel.

I like a nice soft touch, so i sanded to 240 grit, and threw some wax on them.

You could do a number of treatments at this point, so it's really up to you.

Step 6: Thanks for Looking

Check out the video for more information and an easier walk through of the build.

Drop me any questions you have and i'm always happy to discuss things.

Take Care Everyone.

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17 Comments

0
Noertsch
Noertsch

1 year ago

Excuse me, would you be so kind and modify the title of your instructable, so it is historical correct. I appreciate your instructable of this fine furniture. But there are no existing archaeological finds, that prove this chair was used in medieval scandinavia around the year nine hundred. On the other hand there are finds and proofs, that this kind of chair is an old african birthing chair. In doubt, check with a small google research. In fact, I do really understand, that it's cooler to build a Viking Stargazing Chair than an african furniture of midwifery.

0
WildcardCurios
WildcardCurios

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks for your comment. I'm going to keep the title as it is, because as you said, it sounds cooler. If anyone wants more historical accuracy, i'll leave the comments here for them to take a look through.

0
DougL56
DougL56

Reply 1 year ago

Don't be so hard on the guy. Americans have been using the term "viking chair" (accurately or not) to describe this simple piece of furniture since the late 1800s. In the 1930s they were popular woodworking projects for Boy Scouts. You might as well complain about the term "California king" as a bed size.

0
DougL56
DougL56

1 year ago

Some sort of seat cushion might be advisable for those of us who don't have viking butts. :-)

0
olyetal
olyetal

1 year ago

This is great inspiration and it is my next project. Thank you!

0
WOLFONTHEMOUNTAIN
WOLFONTHEMOUNTAIN

1 year ago

I love it, cant wait to make one,
Im gonna do some wood etching/burning
And add strip led lights to the back and bottom.
Thanks for the inspiration!!!

0
DougL56
DougL56

Reply 1 year ago

Use red leds, which won't mess up your night vision, as the whole purpose is stargazing.

0
WildcardCurios
WildcardCurios

Reply 1 year ago

That sounds awesome. Can't wait to see them.

0
DavidF15
DavidF15

1 year ago

By "scaffold boards" you mean nominal 2"x12" (1.5"x11.5" surfaced) boards right?

0
WildcardCurios
WildcardCurios

Reply 1 year ago

These were closer to 1.5" x 9" boards. No reason why you couldn't use a wider board and adjust the width measurements for the mortice and tenon.

0
DavidF15
DavidF15

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks for the numbers (and the instructable)--I was trying to eyeball it from the pics and video. 1.5"x9" is pretty close to the 1.5"x9.5" finished size of a standard 2x10.

0
RüdigerM3
RüdigerM3

1 year ago

Hello, cool instruction. Could you plese give the measurements of your scaffold board for comparsion with what I can get in Germany. Thickness and Width. What do you think how much is the Maximum "LOAD" you can put on the Chair ??? Psssst: Thinking of 130 to 140 Kilogramm. Thanks for your help.

0
WildcardCurios
WildcardCurios

Reply 1 year ago

Of Course. The Thickness is around 1.5" or 35mm roughly, and the width around 9" or 230mm. Load wise, i'm a svelt 95kg and i made sure all my weight was on the board when sitting, and did a bit of a 'bounce' test, so should be ok i reckon.

0
garry.cm
garry.cm

1 year ago on Step 6

So simple a design but absolutely fantastic. Does exactly what it says on the tin

0
jsellers202
jsellers202

1 year ago

In step 2, you mention drawing a second line the width of your boards. I think it would be more clear if you said the thickness of your boards. Other than that, this was a great instructable.

0
WildcardCurios
WildcardCurios

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks. Made the change. Thanks for reading it more thoroughly than i did. :).