Cheap Yet Chic Wood Lath Wall

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Introduction: Cheap Yet Chic Wood Lath Wall

About: Undoing everything a house flipper did. Visit www.flippingtheflip.com

Looking at materials differently can ultimately yield some fantastic room decor on the cheap. For example, a few bundles of inexpensive wood lath, some stain, a few nails, and you've got yourself a stylish wall for less!

Step 1: Before

This poor guest bathroom has seen so many changes and yet none of them ever seemed quite right. That is, until I spotted some $15 bundles of wood lath at the home improvement store.

After some quick math which was hard as math is no longer a strong suit, I grabbed two full bundles and a couple extra loose pieces for this particular project.

Step 2: Staining

I tested out various stains and didn't hit upon the look I wanted until I thinned out the stain with some paint thinner. Now it's a custom color! But really, the color at full strength was too strong.

I stained each wood lath individually by hand. Yes it did take a while but in the end it was totally worth it.

Step 3: Time to Install

This bathroom is not used very often so I didn't seal the wood but it can most certainly be sealed for ease of cleaning and moisture repellence.

Right off the bat, I ran into my first installation dilemma, the toilet water connection. No big deal, I cut around it accordingly.

Step 4: Spacing

I used a paint stir stick to create a gap between the wood lath strips for several reasons, mainly for a cool look but also to give the wood room to do its wood thing.

I merely nailed the lath strips onto the wall with a brad nailer.

Step 5: Going Up

I was sure to cut the wood lath strips into different lengths so that the pattern would be offest and not the same all the way up.

Step 6: Obstacles

Going around the switch and outlet was a bit tricky but as you can see, I had a built-in guide of old paint to show me the way.

Be sure to swing by the blog to find out how I resolved the new difference in depth with the switch cover plate.

Step 7: Last Step: Enjoy

For less than fifty bucks, I had a brand new wall, a high-end chic look at a fraction of the price, and all sorts of textural excitement.

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    20 Comments

    0
    rizoz.vallarta
    rizoz.vallarta

    1 year ago on Step 7

    hola de que medida son las tiras de madera ?

    0
    Flipping the Flip
    Flipping the Flip

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hola. Las tiras de madera son 1/4 "x 1 1/2" x 48 ". ¡Gracias!

    0
    bryans workshop
    bryans workshop

    Question 1 year ago

    Great work! It looks awesome!

    0
    Flipping the Flip
    Flipping the Flip

    Answer 1 year ago

    I’m honored that you like it! Thanks so much!

    0
    charlessenf-gm
    charlessenf-gm

    1 year ago

    It looks great - albeit, from a distance.
    Lathe strips appear to be close to three feet in length - though I didn't see any dimensions listed - and about a quarter of an inch thick and over an inch and a half wide.
    Since wall studs are likely 16" O.C. it would have been good practice to locate them and nail the strips accordingly. Such an approach, in conjunction with a bit of construction adhesive here and there would have been preferable to 'shooting' brads in drywall.that conceals water pipes and electrical wires pneumatically/forcibly.
    As one recently 'in the market'. for another residence, I can tell you that these projects (as so often done by 'flippers') look great in the MLS photos but work to diminish the value of the home once close inspection reveals such shortcuts as excused within this project's description.
    There are 'extension rings' available for electrical boxes (the original box appears to have a 'mud ring' in place) to allow for the additional thickness of the wood covering without 'opening' the electrical box which, as I understand it, is intended to be closed up if not sealed.
    Hey, the project looks nice, and the intent is not to denigrate the project. Rather to caution folks thinking of attempting something similar that poorly executed 'projects' are more likely to reduce the value of a property then enhance it. Think "Buyer's Inspection/Inspector's Report."

    0
    Flipping the Flip
    Flipping the Flip

    Reply 1 year ago

    The lath strips were originally four feet in length and are indeed 1/4” thick by 1 1/2” wide. I cut the strips to vary the pattern.

    As this is not meant to be permanent, it’s meant to be easily removed, I didn’t tack into the studs nor use adhesive. For sure, if someone were doing this more permanently those are advisable steps, knowing that adhesive will damage the wall upon a later design decision change. So, as such, I’m not excusing shortcuts, as you state. I don’t step into projects frivolously.

    Ya know, I think a lot of this depends on who’s doing the installation, why, and how. Sure, flippers are not always known for quality work but that shouldn’t deter someone from trying any project. Folks should research, learn, and try new things, in my opinion. If we all do things, or not do things, driven by the mountainous amount of concerns regarding anything, we’d all be hermits in very boring houses.

    This is likely my error in presenting a project meant more to inspire ideas and creativity rather than as a cut and dry how-to.

    0
    rsgrillo
    rsgrillo

    Question 1 year ago on Introduction

    Nice. Are you accumulating dust along the top edges and have insects homesteaded?
    Do you vacuum it, brush?

    0
    Flipping the Flip
    Flipping the Flip

    Answer 1 year ago

    Thanks! As this room is so rarely used, I’m not seeing a lot of dust collecting. I use a vacuum hose with a brush attached to clean it, yes. We don’t have issues with insects.

    0
    sharpstick
    sharpstick

    1 year ago

    Nice wall. I hope you nailed into studs, not drywall. It's easier to cut the space around outlets and cover with oversize plates. (I usually get nylon ones instead of plastic.)

    0
    Flipping the Flip
    Flipping the Flip

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks! No, I didn't, just the drywall. It's been fine, only a couple loose ones but I push them back and it's fine. It's not meant to be a permanent installation. Good tip on the oversize plates, thanks!

    0
    notbad
    notbad

    1 year ago

    Very nice. Any issues with the pieces staying up with just brad nails? Seems like they could eventually pop loose.

    0
    Flipping the Flip
    Flipping the Flip

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks! A couple have come loose but it's not too bad, just a little movement. I push them back and it's fine.

    0
    Flipping the Flip
    Flipping the Flip

    Reply 1 year ago

    Excellent, I hope you do! Thanks!

    0
    jessyratfink
    jessyratfink

    1 year ago

    I love the way that looks!

    0
    acheide
    acheide

    1 year ago

    Nice use of your smarts.

    0
    AussieAlf
    AussieAlf

    1 year ago

    You've gone a good job there...very smart.