Heggs Bacon Particle

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Intro: Heggs Bacon Particle

Experiment resulting in the Heggs Bacon Particle.

Step 1: Preparation

To recreate this experiment you will need high quality bacon, eggs, high energy IR radiation source and containment vessel.

Step 2: Prepare the Bacon for Injection of Heggs Subparticles.

Place the bacon into the inferred containment vessel and expose to high levels of IR radiation.

Step 3: Heggs Injection

Transfer a desired quantity of bacon to a smaller containment vessel and then inject two heggs particles. Expose to radiation until mass fuses.

Step 4: Final Notes.

As you can see there are a wide variety of configurations.

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    27 Discussions

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    xerxesx20

    9 years ago on Introduction

    Yum! I'm pleased that somebody else calls eggs by their proper name "heggs". I know, I know: It's a kitchen-born higgs boson in disguise but I nearly always call eggs heggs. :-) A hilarious 'ible too four stars.

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    minerugxerxesx20

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    Aussies from sinny' (sydney) would call this experiment 'baked necks' (bacon + eggs)

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    Andrewr05

    9 years ago on Introduction

    I do this all the time, people call it being lazy but I call it efficient.

    Half cook a whole pack of bacon in your largest frying pan.
    (yes it will look like brains)

    Whisk up 6 eggs (not too much) in a bowl with ~1/4 cup of milk, add pepper to your liking. Any cheese of your preference is optional.

    Add in with half cooked bacon and 'BAM!' you've got a scrambled bacon omelet thingamajig...

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    tubajoey1

    10 years ago on Introduction

    dude...I love you. this is AMAZING!!! i might get up early this morning before school and make one! VERY nice job!

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    Sandisk1duo

    10 years ago on Introduction

    wow, i didn't know atom smashing and sub-atomic black holes were so delicious!

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    jc817

    10 years ago on Introduction

    And to think people were worried about the Large Hadron Collider. I think science should always be delicious.

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    westfw

    10 years ago on Introduction

    For a long while, I've thought of high-energy physics as being like a biologist trying to study chicken embryology by throwing eggs against a wall, and analyzing the splatters...

    1 reply
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    jillgwestfw

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    its more like smashing two oranges together and getting a strawberry then figuring out why. good and finny ible