How to Restote a Hammer

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Introduction: How to Restote a Hammer

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Step 1: Buy a Hammer

I bought a plane setting hammer for one euro.
It is in pretty good shape and will only need minor improvements.

Step 2: Start the Process

Saw off the head. So you can use a drift to punch out the remaining part of the handle in the head.

Step 3: Sanding the Head

After you have taken out the handle, you start sanding the hammer head to take off any rust or gunk that is on there.

Step 4: Sanding the Handle

When you are done sanding the head you start sanding the handle to bear wood (remove dirt or lacker)

Step 5: Sawing the Wedgeslot

When you are done sanding you start sawing a slot for the wedge. Dont go too deep. But dont make it too shalow. Or the wedge wont go deep enough.

Step 6: Fitting the Head

Now you start putting on the head. You want it to sit tinht but not too tight. USE A WOODEN MALLET not a steel hammer. or you will damnage the handle and head.
After the head is on you put glue on the wedge and hammer it in using a wooden mallet. Otherwise the wedge will crack.

Step 7: Making the Handle Finish

Using terpentine and boiled linseed oil in a 1 to 1 ratio you make a small amout of th mixture (doesnt need to be alot)
You apply it wearing gloves and with a piece of paper towel. You can allso put some of the mixture on the head to prevent it from rusting.

Step 8: Extra Creddit

Now when the oil in the handle is dried you need to apply pure linseed oil on the handle onece a week

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    20 Discussions

    0
    Alywolf
    Alywolf

    3 years ago

    The only time the I have put a new handle on so far, I used a wooden wedge and then 90 degress to that was a thin metal toothed wedge. It wont budge for a good long time.

    0
    pfred2
    pfred2

    Reply 3 years ago

    soak the top in boiled linseed oil and you've done the complete job. The oil swells the handle inside the eye, then won't let it dry out.

    0
    Alywolf
    Alywolf

    Reply 3 years ago

    thanks will do

    0
    pfred2
    pfred2

    Reply 3 years ago

    over the past couple of days I've soaked a couple hammers of mine here myself. I don't really soak mine though, I stand them upright in a vise (a Record Quick Vise with rubber padded jaws) and just put a puddle of linseed oil up on the eye.

    0
    Alywolf
    Alywolf

    Reply 3 years ago

    The hammer that I am going to be doing first is a very old, and used copper hammer, Now that I have the head off, I want to see if I can anneal the ends at least. Currently it chips when I use it becuase the ends are sooooo work hardened.

    0
    Alywolf
    Alywolf

    Reply 3 years ago

    The hammer that I am going to be doing first is a very old, and used copper hammer, Now that I have the head off, I want to see if I can anneal the ends at least. Currently it chips when I use it becuase the ends are sooooo work hardened.

    0
    nehmo
    nehmo

    3 years ago

    Is not a plastic handle better? Wood has it's place, but when it's a hammer handle, I always feel the need to check the connection to the head. With the synthetic composition handle, I can have confidence that the connection is secure. That's one less concern.

    0
    Wolfiestormes
    Wolfiestormes

    3 years ago

    I use metal hammer wedges when I replace handles, if the head becomes loose on the handle you can drift them tight again.

    I also only oil handles once when I fit them, and make sure the oil is completely dry before using it.

    0
    pfred2
    pfred2

    Reply 3 years ago

    One way to handle a hammer is to run a wooden wedge in the saw kerf, trim that, then put metal wedges perpendicular to the wooden wedge. Then the handle expands in all directions. Many would consider that the only proper way to do it. I'd agree with them too.

    0
    The_knifemaker123
    The_knifemaker123

    Reply 3 years ago

    on axes i do that but not on this small hammer. it was a tight fit allready and didn't need a metal wedge

    0
    pfred2
    pfred2

    Reply 3 years ago

    If the head is on solid then I suppose you do not.

    0
    baecker03
    baecker03

    Reply 3 years ago

    You can secure the wood wedge with epoxy or wood glue as well

    0
    The_knifemaker123
    The_knifemaker123

    3 years ago

    @alywolf you could buy a handle or just make one out of a hickory billet

    0
    Alywolf
    Alywolf

    3 years ago

    Thank you for this instructable. I have several hammers that need this, but many of them have bad handles, any suggestions?

    0
    XXLRay
    XXLRay

    3 years ago

    Wow - that's a wide wedge. I usually make mines much narrower.

    0
    trevorlo78
    trevorlo78

    4 years ago

    Why would you bother having to put oil in the handle once a week . That's stupid

    0
    XXLRay
    XXLRay

    Reply 3 years ago

    I totally agree. Once a year if at all is absolutely sufficient.

    0
    matt.sims.37266
    matt.sims.37266

    4 years ago

    Just a point, most hammers I've re handled have not had a straight design the main grip there usually wider then the eye section to allow them to be held comfortably meaning if you cut the head off the handle will no longer go into the eye.