Ultra Strong Tape Bonding Trick!


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Tape had difficulty to stick? waxy or uneven surface? You need repair on cold climate? Tape need to hold on harsh weather?

There a easy and amazingly durable fix!
This trick is great for tarp shelter repair!
Please rate me! :)

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Step 1: You Will Need:

Gorilla tape ( tough&wide if available)
Acetone
Knife
scuff scotch-brite pad
paper towel
Heat gun or hair dryer           "Genuine idea!" please rate

WARNING!
A well ventilated or open area
Only recommend to use heat on Gorilla Tape! Other will be damage!

Step 2:

Before doing anything, try some acetone on a non visible area for testing...
Nothing wierd happen? OK!
Next the thinking part! Think you will have to overlap the tape at least 3" all around the damaged area.

Step 3:

NOW! Clean the surface and brush off hard with acetone all the area where the tape would be. Wipe and make sure it well clean before applying Gorilla Tape.

Step 4:

Now install the tape PERFECTLY flat.
Repeated these step on the other side of the tarp.
You can also add strength on friction area.

Step 5:

Heat the installed tape the hottest your skin can handle. About 50°C\120°F
DO NOT OVERHEAT OR MELT THE TARP (you can wear glove)
Now strongly rub the tape into the surface and leave no air bubble between. This will help achieve a better bond.

Now it will be good for another winter!

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    3 Discussions

    0
    None
    corporatelab

    5 years ago on Introduction

    Criket, thanks for assembling and testing a really good sequence of steps for a repair. Yes, the heat is a terrific idea. There are large differences between different brands and types of duct tape, so that specific and tested successful recipes for a particular tape - Gorilla in this case - are of inestimable value. Being non-generic makes this a real tool to "carry on our belts", so to speak.

    I could try to fill in on a section you left out (although this would be a little more generic). If acetone *does* affect (melts, distorts) the material to be repaired, then as an attempted substitute scrub hard the material with soap and water, rinse, dry, and then scrub with 91% isopropyl alcohol, and rub dry. That 9% water in the alcohol is important, since we are here using the alcohol not as a solvent (alcohol is not very good as a solvent anyway) but as an emulsifier (kind-of like a soap). Rubbing dry (clean cloth) from the center out may be helpful.

    Thanks to WolfDog for his help wih the article.

    Hope you don't mind my "add". I thank you for your work. And good luck.

    0
    None
    buttersnake

    9 years ago on Introduction

    I find it more like in spirit mood cause when they use any similar product...
    Not because your instructable is not cool!
    i just find cooler to use a product "who can be" one of sponsor, even if it's not.
    i did not underrate autor cause of this, just suggestion to be awesome!

    0
    None
    l8nite

    9 years ago on Introduction

    The trick is making sure the surface is REALLY clean but I hadn't thought about appling heat. They do sell a mending kit for the "tarps" which is supposedly a special tape but I can't locate the website right now