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Hello there, I'm Essa, 19 years old. Since I was a young child, I had strong interests in science and all weird things, I used to collect magnets from my toys and weird-looking stones... and as I grew up, science in general made a huge part of my life, actually science is what keeps me alive :p . now from time to time I'll be making projects that'll cover various fields, some will be simple, others may be hard, I'll try my best to simplify things..

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  • Hello there, sorry for the late reply as I haven't logged in for a long time, honestly I don't have much knowledge about the details of working with these rather than just random experimentation.But I remember as I measured the voltage drop using a multimeter it was a lot which indicates there's a substantial current flow, so maybe you'll need a less limiting resistanceThough I don't really recommend experimenting with voltage of the mains as it's really dangerous, but I remember that using a microwave's transformer to step up the voltage to around 2000v makes producing arcs much easier, again I don't think such setup is the suitable to make an arc furnace, I recommend you review the circuitry of an actual arc furnace see what're the voltage current requirements as well as the safety prec…

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    Hello there, sorry for the late reply as I haven't logged in for a long time, honestly I don't have much knowledge about the details of working with these rather than just random experimentation.But I remember as I measured the voltage drop using a multimeter it was a lot which indicates there's a substantial current flow, so maybe you'll need a less limiting resistanceThough I don't really recommend experimenting with voltage of the mains as it's really dangerous, but I remember that using a microwave's transformer to step up the voltage to around 2000v makes producing arcs much easier, again I don't think such setup is the suitable to make an arc furnace, I recommend you review the circuitry of an actual arc furnace see what're the voltage current requirements as well as the safety precautions,By the way you can find carbon rods easily they're usually used as the positive electrode in a size D battery, use gloves and sheets as it's messy and you need to safely dispose the garbage afterwards:After removing the protective plastic cover around the battery (if they're not just printed on metal) try to carefully pry open the positive side of the battery from the edges, you'll see black powder inside and a circular thing in the center, carefully hold the circular thing using pliers and rotate left and right while pulling outwards, once it's out, wash it and give it a good heating in open ventilated area to burn off a material that covers it, and there you have it your carbon electrode

    Hello there, sorry for the late reply as I haven't logged in for a long time, honestly I don't have much knowledge about the details of working with these rather than just random experimentation.But I remember as I measured the voltage drop using a multimeter it was a lot which indicates there's a substantial current flow, so maybe you'll need a less limiting resistanceThough I don't really recommend experimenting with voltage of the mains as it's really dangerous, but I remember that using a microwave's transformer to step up the voltage to around 2000v makes producing arcs much easier (air needs higher voltages to breakdown and sustain a plasma arc), again I don't think such setup is the suitable to make an arc furnace, I recommend you review the circuitry of an actual arc furnace see w…

    see more »

    Hello there, sorry for the late reply as I haven't logged in for a long time, honestly I don't have much knowledge about the details of working with these rather than just random experimentation.But I remember as I measured the voltage drop using a multimeter it was a lot which indicates there's a substantial current flow, so maybe you'll need a less limiting resistanceThough I don't really recommend experimenting with voltage of the mains as it's really dangerous, but I remember that using a microwave's transformer to step up the voltage to around 2000v makes producing arcs much easier (air needs higher voltages to breakdown and sustain a plasma arc), again I don't think such setup is the suitable to make an arc furnace, I recommend you review the circuitry of an actual arc furnace see what're the voltage current requirements as well as the safety precautions,By the way you can find carbon rods easily they're usually used as the positive electrode in a size D battery, use gloves and sheets as it's messy and you need to safely dispose the garbage afterwards:After removing the protective plastic cover around the battery (if they're not just printed on metal) try to carefully pry open the positive side of the battery from the edges, you'll see black powder inside and a circular thing in the center, carefully hold the circular thing using pliers and rotate left and right while pulling outwards, once it's out, wash it and give it a good heating in open ventilated area to burn off a material that covers it, and there you have it your carbon electrode

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