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34CommentsSan Francisco Bay Area, USAJoined May 3rd, 2016
Contact about hands-on, project-based, high student motivation education mary2al(AT)aol.com
  • How to Sharpen Used and Dull Drill Bits (By Hand!!)

    --> ArthurS22; It would be nice to have a 'trick' like this but it seems it doesn't leave the relief behind the cutting edge but would make it even from tip to the back--no? Have you used your sharpened bits say, in a drill press into soft steel and gotten a nice contiuous curl of steel coming out?

    I am referring to ArthurS22's technique, below, of putting the bit into an electric drill and then sharpening it. For some reason whenItried to reply to him it only allowed a new post.

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  • AlM47 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 11 Unusual Uses for Coffee2 years ago
    11 Unusual Uses for Coffee

    Your situation is different and does NOT mean that coffee cannot deodorize a working fridge. FYI you are not ever supposed to leave a turned off fridge with the door closed!! Just proving the doors open an inch would have prevented your mould.

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  • AlM47 commented on IoTalabs's instructable How to Solder - The Quick, Thorough Guide2 years ago
    How to Solder - The Quick, Thorough Guide

    IoTalabs--Nice guide! What do you think of these ideas? 1--A cheap or low powered soldering iron can be very frustrating. A 40 watt can be good for normal #14 and smaller wire 60 watt for bigger stuff--it should quickly (= less than 1 second) melt the solder. After a while an iron can lose power but often simply taking the cold tip out and putting it back in will renew it. 2--Lead free solder can be hard to use--A small fan can blow the little bit of leaded solder smoke away from you. 3--It is easy to over heat the wire which makes it brittle and prone to breaking down the road. Because of this it is now illegal to solder many joints in Aerospace and transportation where vibration and movement occur. Getting a good hot iron to quickly heat up the joint then getting it off quickly is the...

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    IoTalabs--Nice guide! What do you think of these ideas? 1--A cheap or low powered soldering iron can be very frustrating. A 40 watt can be good for normal #14 and smaller wire 60 watt for bigger stuff--it should quickly (= less than 1 second) melt the solder. After a while an iron can lose power but often simply taking the cold tip out and putting it back in will renew it. 2--Lead free solder can be hard to use--A small fan can blow the little bit of leaded solder smoke away from you. 3--It is easy to over heat the wire which makes it brittle and prone to breaking down the road. Because of this it is now illegal to solder many joints in Aerospace and transportation where vibration and movement occur. Getting a good hot iron to quickly heat up the joint then getting it off quickly is the trick. In aerospace Anderson connectors are often used--they require a special crimper but eliminate the need to solder connections and provide a superior joint. They are a plug and are very good for some applications. 4--Constantly (every 20-30 seconds) wipe the tip on the wet sponge mentioned to keep the tip smooth and shiny looking--prevents the tip from deteriorating. This is why most iron holders have a sponge holder built in.

    LoTablas--very nice! What do you think of these ideas; 1--A cheap or low powered soldering iron can be very frustrating. A 40 watt can be good for normal #14 and smaller wire 60 watt for bigger stuff and circuit boards require less = 15-25watts--it should quickly (= less than 1 second) melt the solder. After a while an iron can lose power but often simply taking the cold tip out and putting it back in will renew it. 2--Lead free solder can be hard to use--A small fan can blow the little bit of leaded solder smoke away from you. 3--It is easy to over heat the wire which makes it brittle and prone to breaking down the road. Because of this it is now illegal to solder many joints in Aerospace and transportation where vibration and movement occur. Getting a good hot iron to quickly heat u...

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    LoTablas--very nice! What do you think of these ideas; 1--A cheap or low powered soldering iron can be very frustrating. A 40 watt can be good for normal #14 and smaller wire 60 watt for bigger stuff and circuit boards require less = 15-25watts--it should quickly (= less than 1 second) melt the solder. After a while an iron can lose power but often simply taking the cold tip out and putting it back in will renew it. 2--Lead free solder can be hard to use--A small fan can blow the little bit of leaded solder smoke away from you. 3--It is easy to over heat the wire which makes it brittle and prone to breaking down the road. Because of this it is now illegal to solder many joints in Aerospace and transportation where vibration and movement occur. Getting a good hot iron to quickly heat up the joint then getting it off quickly is the trick. In aerospace Anderson connectors are often used--they require a special crimper but eliminate the need to solder connections and provide a superior joint. They are a plug and are very good for some applications. 4--Constantly (every 20-30 seconds) wipe the tip on the wet sponge mentioned to keep the tip smooth and shiny looking--prevents the tip from deteriorating. This is why most iron holders have a sponge holder built in.

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  • AlM47 commented on soldering iron's instructable How to Solder - Basic Soldering Guide2 years ago
    How to Solder - Basic Soldering Guide

    I use a 40 watt iron--anything less is frustrating.

    Circuit boards may require lower powered irons! the 40 and 60 watt suggested here is for wire and metal.

    A few additional details to an excellent guide; 1--A cheap or low powered soldering iron can be very frustrating. A 40 watt can be good for normal #14 and smaller wire 60 watt for bigger stuff--it should quickly (= less than 1 second) melt the solder. After a while an iron can lose power but often simply taking the cold tip out and putting it back in will renew it. 2--Lead free solder can be hard to use--A small fan can blow the little bit of leaded solder smoke away from you. 3--It is easy to over heat the wire which makes it brittle and prone to breaking down the road. Because of this it is now illegal to solder many joints in Aerospace and transportation where vibration and movement occur. Getting a good hot iron to quickly heat up the joint then getting it off quickly is the trick....

    see more »

    A few additional details to an excellent guide; 1--A cheap or low powered soldering iron can be very frustrating. A 40 watt can be good for normal #14 and smaller wire 60 watt for bigger stuff--it should quickly (= less than 1 second) melt the solder. After a while an iron can lose power but often simply taking the cold tip out and putting it back in will renew it. 2--Lead free solder can be hard to use--A small fan can blow the little bit of leaded solder smoke away from you. 3--It is easy to over heat the wire which makes it brittle and prone to breaking down the road. Because of this it is now illegal to solder many joints in Aerospace and transportation where vibration and movement occur. Getting a good hot iron to quickly heat up the joint then getting it off quickly is the trick. In aerospace Anderson connectors are often used--they require a special crimper but eliminate the need to solder connections and provide a superior joint. They are a plug and are very good for some applications. 4--Constantly (every 20-30 seconds) wipe the tip on the wet sponge mentioned to keep the tip smooth and shiny looking--prevents the tip from deteriorating. This is why most iron holders have a sponge holder built in.

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  • AlM47 commented on OutdoorGirl16196's instructable How to Build an Electric Ukulele!2 years ago
    How to Build an Electric Ukulele!

    Yes, This is a difficult project. Either she is a prodegy/genius or a luthier/cabinet maker helper her.

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  • AlM47 commented on PaleoDan's instructable The BO-AT Single Sheet Plywood Boat2 years ago
    The BO-AT Single Sheet Plywood Boat

    A sailboat would need a rudder too. To be strong and safe a center board and rudder are more complicated than this hull. The sail can get you out in the offing and you can sink like theTitanic = take it easy :-)

    A sailboat would need a rudder too. To be strong and safe a center board and rudder are more complicated than this hull. The sail can get you out in the offing and you can sink like theTitanic if the whole contraption isn't made well = take it easy :-)

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  • 9 MORE Unusual Tool Storage Methods - Part 2

    Details from Phil; You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut – if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the “show” face of the batten – push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the...

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    Details from Phil; You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut – if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the “show” face of the batten – push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the awkward tools.If you pass one end of the loop through itself, it becomes self-tightening (look up Prusik loop used in climbing).I haven't found anything in the workshop of reasonable size and weight that you can't do by this method, in fact I have one gareage wall, already battened and ply faced covered in tools and other objects.You can see where everything is and quickly give the tools a spray of WD40 now and again.

    Details from Phil; You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut – if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the “show” face of the batten – push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the ...

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    Details from Phil; You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut – if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the “show” face of the batten – push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the awkward tools.If you pass one end of the loop through itself, it becomes self-tightening (look up Prusik loop used in climbing).I haven't found anything in the workshop of reasonable size and weight that you can't do by this method, in fact I have one gareage wall, already battened and ply faced covered in tools and other objects.You can see where everything is and quickly give the tools a spray of WD40 now and again. >> For larger tools you may increase the size of 'batten' and/or bolts & washers.

    Details from Phil; You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut – if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the “show” face of the batten – push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the...

    see more »

    Details from Phil; You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut – if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the “show” face of the batten – push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the awkward tools.If you pass one end of the loop through itself, it becomes self-tightening (look up Prusik loop used in climbing).I haven't found anything in the workshop of reasonable size and weight that you can't do by this method, in fact I have one gareage wall, already battened and ply faced covered in tools and other objects.You can see where everything is and quickly give the tools a spray of WD40 now and again.

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  • 9 MORE Unusual Tool Storage Methods - Part 2

    From my many decades of experience with epoxy I wouldn't want to wonder how long the joint would hold the weight and the epoxy either let go of the smooth rod and it slip in the hole or the epoxy break out of the particle board or wood. I'll use the idea but bend both ends of the rod at 90 degrees then drill two holes and it will hold the weight by the engineering of its own design and the epoxy will just hold it in the holes so it doesn't get pulled out of the holes.

    Yep, I know this but it is not mentioned in the instructions!Now I don't understand what this means --> "The wood pretty much welds itself to the plywood" What wood & plywood might that refer to?

    The batten was already "fixed to the wall" so how does one "insert it through the other side?"

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  • 9 MORE Unusual Tool Storage Methods - Part 2

    how might one "fix a roofing bolt to the batten?"

    Can't understand the pliers holder. It looks like a rod bent 90 degrees at one end and that end glued in a hole. There should be a pic without the pliers blocking the holder so we can see the project. If it is as I surmise above then the epoxy may very well fail from the weight of the pliers--There is no mechanical design/engineering in place other than epoxy. If there is something else giving it strength then this should be shown and described.Thanks,A

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  • AlM47 commented on darbinorvar's instructable How To Build a Shed2 years ago
    How To Build a Shed

    Does this mean 1--the nails are too high = to lose to the top edge or 2--as it reads = the shingles themselves are too high?

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  • AlM47 commented on geekrex's instructable Hacking a RC car2 years ago
    Hacking a RC car

    You give unusually good explanations--perhaps you will be an engineering teacher/professor someday! Probably make more $ as an engineer/inventor :-)

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  • How to make an Universal DC Motor Speed Controller

    On the IRF530 MOSFET read the reviews and look for a better one "Failed...I'm only buying components from Mouser and Digikey from now on. Cheap ICs on Amazon and ebay have too high a failure rate."

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  • AlM47 commented on voiceoverbob's instructable Fixing an Outdoor Faucet2 years ago
    Fixing an Outdoor Faucet

    Don't forget to turn the water to the faucet off first! A channel lock pliers is hardly ever the "best" way to turn a nut but it will do in a pinch. Pliers actually damage the nut a little each time you use them. When possible a wrench should be used--most likely a large crescent adjustable wrench.

    As far as I know the washer is always held on with a screw and it looks as if your screw is broken off. Your idea of CA glue might be the best or only way to hold it on with no screw but the surface should be cleaned with wire brush first. The screws are often rusted in place and that's probably why yours broke off. A bit of WD-40 can help loosen rusted screws sometimes.

    What/why a 12" hose bibb and how do they affect freezing?

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  • AlM47 commented on ojeda8th's instructable How To Train Your Rat and Other Rodents2 years ago
    How To Train Your Rat and Other Rodents

    I didn't see it said much to use clicker training which is to click (with tongue or clicker) at the exact instant the animal does the trick. This is more powerful than simply giving a reward because the click shows the exact instant the trick was done. if you only give a reward the animal has done a number of little behaviors and doesn't know exactly which one was the good one. So click the instant of performance then give the treat.

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  • AlM47 commented on Mikki G.W's instructable How to Clicker Train a Cat2 years ago
    How to Clicker Train a Cat

    A benefit of training your cat is that they often become much more aware and communicative with you. Our 3mo old cat entered a whole new world and became much like a dog. He now responds to simple requests like 'come here' and he talks to us regularly. If he enters a room where one of his humans is he always gives a small meow to say hi--or if we enter his room. It is quite convenient to be able to communicate with your cat like; come, stay, sit and etc. Said cat can also roll over, shake hands, circle (first trick) jump high (quite spectacular) and sit and wait for his food instead of crowding the bowl as it comes down.

    Another thing I did to clicker train my cat is to use a mouth/tongue click instead of a mechanical clicker. Your mouth is always with you and you don't have to go get something to click but can train anytime--it seems to work just as well.

    I have trained my cat to do 10 tricks with clicker training. I researched it and learned to train my cat a little differently than I understand it here. The idea I read about and used is the way they train movie animals to do tricks. The slight (and I think essential) difference is that the click is made at the exact time the cat does the trick--this way the cat learns precisely what is being rewarded. After the click the treat is given which is often immediately after but it doesn't matter if sometimes you have to reach for or get a treat from another room cuz the precise click has already shown what behavior is being rewarded. Above it says "If he does, give him a treat and click" I would always click at the moment of correct performance and THEN give the treat. The power o...

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    I have trained my cat to do 10 tricks with clicker training. I researched it and learned to train my cat a little differently than I understand it here. The idea I read about and used is the way they train movie animals to do tricks. The slight (and I think essential) difference is that the click is made at the exact time the cat does the trick--this way the cat learns precisely what is being rewarded. After the click the treat is given which is often immediately after but it doesn't matter if sometimes you have to reach for or get a treat from another room cuz the precise click has already shown what behavior is being rewarded. Above it says "If he does, give him a treat and click" I would always click at the moment of correct performance and THEN give the treat. The power of clicker training is clicking at the precise moment so the cat (or other animal) knows what it did to get the treat.

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