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Alaskan Bev

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My husband spoils me! I spend my life covered in sawdust and paint - I'm the luckiest person in the world!

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  • CNC Coffee Clip + Scoop

    And all this time I've been just dumping open bags of coffee into a washed-out empty peanut butter jar (heavy duty glass)! Your invention looks so classy! Thanks for sharing.

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  • Live Edge and Plywood Coffee Table

    A cactus?! Oh - my - goodness! That should certainly be one way to solve it! I'll spend the rest of the winter thinking up other ideas; I so love the design of this table! Thanks!

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  • Live Edge and Plywood Coffee Table

    When I make one of these, which I definitely plan to do next summer (here in our Alaska home it's been -10 to -15 all week and my wood shop is not heated), I will probably squirrel around with the "legs" some. I'm curious if people would be tempted to sit on this, mistaking the table for a bench. It looks as if it could be pretty tippy if sat upon.

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  • Pallet Wood Pencils (1,000 of Them!)

    Jackman. I Love your write-up, which probably took longer than the pencil-making itself! I go through lots of pencils. As a person who reads my Bible every night, I have long since found that pencils work better than pens for making notes on those very thin pages. Pencils with erasers are also great for carefully cutting out a windmill shape on card stock, affixing it onto the eraser with a plain straight pin or even a push pin, and then waving it through the air! There must be 1,000 uses for pencils, so keep working, jackman! I offer a non-conforming-use-of-pencils challenge! You Rock!

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  • DIY Cornhole Boards, Bags and Scoreboard

    Hi, PatP. The instructor is not talking about sowing. It is sewing. The words are pronounced the same but they have different meanings. This kind of sewing means taking thread, putting it through either a sewing machine needle or a hand-held needle, and then making very tiny stitches with the needle, running the thread all the way through both layers of fabric. You fold the fabric in half so that you have a six-inch square, then you sew up each side and a little bit across the top, leaving enough open space in the middle so that you can add a couple of cups of poly beads, ask for them at a sewing/fabric store). Then you finish sewing the top closed so that none of the beads fall out. You use this bag to stand back and try to throw the weighed bag through the six-inch hole at the opposite …

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    Hi, PatP. The instructor is not talking about sowing. It is sewing. The words are pronounced the same but they have different meanings. This kind of sewing means taking thread, putting it through either a sewing machine needle or a hand-held needle, and then making very tiny stitches with the needle, running the thread all the way through both layers of fabric. You fold the fabric in half so that you have a six-inch square, then you sew up each side and a little bit across the top, leaving enough open space in the middle so that you can add a couple of cups of poly beads, ask for them at a sewing/fabric store). Then you finish sewing the top closed so that none of the beads fall out. You use this bag to stand back and try to throw the weighed bag through the six-inch hole at the opposite end of the cornhole board. If you Google "playing cornhole," and watch a few minutes of it on youtube it'll all make sense. Have fun!

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  • Simple RFID Blocking Wallet

    Thank you for the great photos and understandable instructions. I have always been hard on fragile items so I wouldn't trust aluminum foil to work for me. However, wearing strong gloves, I cut the top and bottom off of a donated energy drink can (I don't drink those), cut a straight line lengthwise down the can, flattened out the sheet, traced around a credit card, folded it over slightly larger, then wrapped decorative duct tape around the outside. I taped the top and bottom as well to prevent sharp edges cutting my fingers, and that has worked perfectly for years. I even took photos and planned to write an Instructable for it but never got around to it. If all this seems like too much work, the very functional anti-RFID wallets have become quite affordable.

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on tonywye's instructable Tin Can Pancakes
    Tin Can Pancakes

    Oh, my, now I know what exciting project I'll have going this week-end! I haven't made one of these stoves for a while, and I have never cooked pancakes on mine. Yum - here we come! Thanks for this awesome idea, tonywye! Cook on!

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  • Oh, Matt, you've done it again! Excellent, easy-to-follow Instructable with super-awesome photos. When we lived in Vicksburg, MS "back in the day," I mentioned to a neighbor that we were planning to drive down to New Orleans for the week-end and she raptured on about how we would simply Have to go to this certain place and try the beignets! She was right - they were amazing! I've been wanting some lately, for some reason, but lifelong Alaskans have no idea what I want and just hand me fry-bread, which is incredible enough in its own right. Now you've got me going - I'm going to have to make these Very Soon! Thanks again, sir!

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  • Earlier this year I had to undergo a bone marrow biopsy (which with no form of anesthetics was totally painless; great specialist!), then returned to my dr a few days later for the results. She was overjoyed to inform me that I was completely clear, then told me, "Celebrate! Go out and eat chocolate! It Is Valentine's Day, after all!" I said, "Eh. I can take it or leave it. Now black licorice!..." "I like red licorice," she said, "but you go do whatever you want!" Now this ultra-tempting fudge recipe may just do it! I'm going to try it, Lyds, and hope that I do not become too addicted...

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  • You've done it again, Matt! Lovely recipe. It's very similar to the one I developed when our kids were little; we used to have them for supper on occasion and it was a Big Deal if we had ice cream to go on top! I like to use about half whole wheat and half regular white flour. It still has the nice fluffy texture but a more robust flavor. My best friend has a restaurant-style waffle maker that makes Two at once! She puts batter in the top one, flips it over, and adds batter to the bottom one! Great Instructable and photos; thanks!

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  • Betsy, the writer is not hemming the britches for one of her growing kids, she says in Step One, "My husband has short legs..." I suppose he could change size or shape in girth, as many of us do as we age, and he could even lose an inch or two in height, as I have done, but the writer will probably do just fine with the excellent 'ible she has put together for us.

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  • In some other recipes I read many moons ago it was said that if you were short an egg in a two-egg recipe, you could substitute a fair-sized dollop of mayonnaise for the missing egg. However, you asked for substitutes for "eggs," which is a whole different matter. If allergies, dietary restrictions or preferences (veganism, religious), or cost prohibit the use of eggs, you may have to really experiment and hopefully come up with something workable or else just forego recipes such as this. Good luck!

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  • Maybe it's just me, but I am not understanding something in step one of this intriguing recipe, Gathering Ingredients. I am reading it to say that if one cup of sugar is too sweet, add another half-cup. How does that work? For most recipes I cut the sugar at least in half because the full amount just seems overpoweringly sweet; my family has gotten used to it. Thanks for your Instructable, excellent photos and all.

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on serhardt's instructable Leather Mystery Braid

    No, it's really a whole different knot from a Turk's head. I've made over a hundred of those. I used to teach them to my high school students during free time; they loved them, too.

    I voted! Great job, thanks. We've made countless mystery braid bracelets, etc., at Boy Scout camp. It's amazing how fast those kids can do these; they'll be finishing half a dozen of them and be off doing some other project while I'm still working in my first one.

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on Tfs27's instructable Ammo Box Grill

    Your write-up and photos are excellent. Thanks for the great sharing! I'll definitely be making one, and will probably make even more as gifts. They're so practical. When I go ice fishing I prepare my small ice fire basics in a large blue (white-speckled) porcelain roasting pan - a few cotton balls rubbed lightly in Vaseline, thin twigs, then a bag of finger-sized twigs, then larger limbs and logs for the actual fire. It gets going easily and burns to be ready for the fire fuel while I am drilling my ice fishing holes (we can fish three ice holes where I live). Then I lay a grill over top of the logs and put the roasting pan on the fire and add a large covered stainless steel roaster with my already-prepared stew, soup, roast, or whatever. It cooks while I'm fishing, and a good solid hot …

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    Your write-up and photos are excellent. Thanks for the great sharing! I'll definitely be making one, and will probably make even more as gifts. They're so practical. When I go ice fishing I prepare my small ice fire basics in a large blue (white-speckled) porcelain roasting pan - a few cotton balls rubbed lightly in Vaseline, thin twigs, then a bag of finger-sized twigs, then larger limbs and logs for the actual fire. It gets going easily and burns to be ready for the fire fuel while I am drilling my ice fishing holes (we can fish three ice holes where I live). Then I lay a grill over top of the logs and put the roasting pan on the fire and add a large covered stainless steel roaster with my already-prepared stew, soup, roast, or whatever. It cooks while I'm fishing, and a good solid hot meal makes the rest of the day just perfect. But I am definitely going to try your ammo can fire kit. It looks even more portable as well as being just plain easy and fun to construct. Good job! Thanks again!

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  • Excellent job! Clear instructions and great photos! Thanks. Question: In the gluing picture there is a paintbrush on the right side of the "wood" cover. Did you use the brush to even out all the wavy glue lines? When I have done wavy-line-gluing a couple of times I've had warped paper; it seems to lie flatter if the glue is patiently spread around the whole paper in a thin layer. I do that by hand. It's quick, the glue is non-toxic, water soluble, and washes right off. Maybe it's just me... Just wondering. Keep posting!

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  • Oh - my - gosh, do these ever look good! I'll be trying them soon; sadly, I can't just eat them right off the computer screen! Thanks for sharing this great 'ible!

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  • I can't envision myself ever needing this kind of simple machine but I loved reading your excellent directions. Even as a retired English teacher, I find that I always have to proof my work for typos. Because you asked, and Only because you asked, the couple of words I noticed were wich, which needs an extra h (as opposed to a witch, a character usually portrayed as ugly and up to no good), as well as bough, which needs a t at the end. Aside from that, I never draw any attention to peoples' spelling. Much better to rejoice over the effort and accomplishment! You have done a fine job and your photos are very good! I could never do as good a job if I had to write in your first language!

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on breadandbananas's instructable Mooncakes

    They are indeed beautiful! Probably because I've just never even thought of it, it's hard for me to imagine such an attractive cookie harboring paste made out of beans! They sound so wild I may just have to try making a batch. (My son is very adventurous and will eat simply anything!) Very nice job - thank you!

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  • I voted! Thank you for sharing this exciting project. It may be a while before I construct one but I've built countless wooden boxes and this looks like a fascinating challenge. Your photos are great and your instructions are very understandable. Good on ya!

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  • This is absolutely brilliant! Well done, sir! One more item now on my bucket list...sigh...

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on nml235l's instructable Cardboard Bender

    Very clever tool, great photos, understandable directions. Overall, thanks for sharing this 'ible!When I need to bend (or cut) cardboard that is flat, not some tricky stuff on the inside of a box or something, I get out our handy flex-steel meter stick, mark the bend line with a pencil (or Sharpie, depending on the need for discreet neatness), and firmly hold down the meter stick and gently fold the cardboard in the direction I want it to bend. EZPZ.

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  • Do you really microwave the gelatin for "30 minutes on high?" That seems like an awfully long time! Then again, I haven't done this before. I intend to try it, though! Thanks. The photos are great!

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on FOOD by Lyds's instructable Carrot Fries

    I haven't made these for a long time, but I just bought a big bag of carrots, so here we go! Thanks for reminding me about them. Great photos and instructions.

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  • Oh - my - goodness, Matt! Not only an enticing treat, but delicious and glamorous as well! You take the cake, Matt! (well...) Thanks!

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  • That is an incredibly gorgeous end result! Great photos, too. Our place is too small to even add something like this but I may make some as gifts. Thanks for sharing all your effort, and adding what not to do as well. Excellent job!

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  • Perfectly lovely, Matt, as always. And I actually believe you on this one - I'll just bet I can do them, too! Your photos are perfect Great job - thanks!

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  • I don't care what the "correct" name of that rod is, cleat rod should definitely become permanent nomenclature. Your fabric selection is beyond perfect. I wish you still lived in Anchorage, though, so that when you get tired of it I could see it at the curb with your old red sign still on it and take it off your hands for you! Perfect Instructable - thanks so much for sharing!

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  • Excellent Instructable, great photography! Thanks for sharing this tip; I may make one for my youngest son, who would probably get way more use from one than I ever would. I loved reading your 'ibble, though, and boo hiss to the grammar cops. I'd like to see them write an 'ibble in Your home language! You did fine; good on ya!

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  • This excellent 'ible has come just in time; thank you! Great photos and clear instructions make this seem possible for a home woodcrafter. Our kids are grown and out of the house now and I am just beginning a recycling project. I want to recycle our daughter's former bedroom into an indoor wood shop. My driveway shop is not heated and power tools used outdoors at -20 in AK doesn't feel like a safe or desirable idea! My first idea was to buy a heavy duty tarp large enough to cover the nice carpet; I may still do that.In my classroom I constructed a nice basic box design for kids to use for sanding down projects. They loved it and it worked well enough to keep the teacher next door from complaining about her many allergies. The principal (one of the very best ever!), who had a large home wo…

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    This excellent 'ible has come just in time; thank you! Great photos and clear instructions make this seem possible for a home woodcrafter. Our kids are grown and out of the house now and I am just beginning a recycling project. I want to recycle our daughter's former bedroom into an indoor wood shop. My driveway shop is not heated and power tools used outdoors at -20 in AK doesn't feel like a safe or desirable idea! My first idea was to buy a heavy duty tarp large enough to cover the nice carpet; I may still do that.In my classroom I constructed a nice basic box design for kids to use for sanding down projects. They loved it and it worked well enough to keep the teacher next door from complaining about her many allergies. The principal (one of the very best ever!), who had a large home wood shop, was very supportive of the woodworking that many of my kids loved, and said he would request a summer project of incorporating an exhaust system into my room. Then he retired and was replaced by an administrator who was not supportive of woodworking and the whole thing closed down.Your sanding box instructions look as if they will work well in the former-bedroom-turned-indoor-wood shop. I'll post pictures when I get the room redesigned and completed. Thanks for your great instructions!

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  • Great 'ible, very understandable. The exellent photography adds a lot to this set of six fine ideas. I particuarly like the candle/matchbox and will plan to make some of those for Christmas. I'm busy converting a small bedroom to an indoor wood shop, as Alaskan winters are not too conducive to outdoor work with power tools and good lumber!I've made catch-alls for nighttime desk use or whatever, but instead of one open area I added inset furring strips to divide the insides, allowing for one square per pocket: top left = left front pocket, top right = right front pocket, etc. I empty out my pockets in a hurry and have everything right where I need it to go into the next pair of pants.

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  • This is really awesome! Great photos and narrative - thanks! I have an old LG tracfone that has next to no sound at all. I bought it because it was the only TML phone that the big box store was carrying (triple your minutes for life). I kept missing calls; my phone would be ringing; it could be right in my vest pocket and I wouldn't hear it! Then I read the reviews on that model and the whispering ringer is a universal complaint. That'll teach me! I'm leaving tomorrow and will be out of state for over a month, but this will be my first project as soon as I return!

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on GaryNDayton's instructable Back Yard Office

    Beautiful job, and the photos are great! Thanks for the inspiration. This is infinitely better than the plastic outta-the-box jobbies! I love that your mom participated and added so much to the entire project. Good on ya, dude!

    Not only does it appear that you have a great deal of experience and expertise, David, but you're also an excellent, very readable writer! Thanks for taking the time to contribute and share with the reading/building world!

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  • I love your writing, m'lord, and the photos are excellent! Thanks for such a great job. I might even be tempted to...

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  • Hi, Edward. It's "Good fences," not "high fences." The reference is from Robert Frost's poem, "Mending Walls," which ends, "Good fences make good neighbors." Tally ho.

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  • Grilled cheese sandwiches are a family favorite here (Alaska), too. They're great alone, but superb with tomato soup! Oh, yum! Growing up in the Catskills backwoods of upstate NY, we called them toasted cheese sandwiches. My current favorite is horseradish cheddar. Pictures, etc. are attached:1. Always begin with clean hands - Soap and warm, running water.2. Current favorite - horseradish cheddar cheese.3. Butter one side of each slice. Turn top slice upsidedown on bottom slice (buttered sides are together). Arrange sliced cheese on top slice.4. Pick up top (cheesed) slice and lay it down on the heating pan. Place the other slice, buttered side up, on top of the bottom slice; the cheese is now in the middle.5. Watch the bottom slice. When it is browned to taste, flip whole sandwich over w…

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    Grilled cheese sandwiches are a family favorite here (Alaska), too. They're great alone, but superb with tomato soup! Oh, yum! Growing up in the Catskills backwoods of upstate NY, we called them toasted cheese sandwiches. My current favorite is horseradish cheddar. Pictures, etc. are attached:1. Always begin with clean hands - Soap and warm, running water.2. Current favorite - horseradish cheddar cheese.3. Butter one side of each slice. Turn top slice upsidedown on bottom slice (buttered sides are together). Arrange sliced cheese on top slice.4. Pick up top (cheesed) slice and lay it down on the heating pan. Place the other slice, buttered side up, on top of the bottom slice; the cheese is now in the middle.5. Watch the bottom slice. When it is browned to taste, flip whole sandwich over with a plastic spatula.6. When the top slice, too, is evenly browned, transfer to pretty plate.7. (Say the blessing, if that is your custom); enjoy your sandwich! Oh, yum! Going, going...8. Almost gone! That was so good, I think I'll go make another one!

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Name Puzzle

    Very nice 'ible (and adorable baby!). I'll probably be making a couple of these, but in the current educator fashion (as a retired special ed teacher). For years we've been having to reteach kindergartners how to write their names so that only the first letter is capitalized. Does the program you use also provide lower case letters? If I ever get around to this I'll send you pictures/vid. Thanks for the fine photography, understandable directions, and new inspiration!

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  • Very nice instructable, great photos; thanks. When I was teaching in inner city study skills classes I taught a comprehensive unit on winter outdoor survival because so many of my students flew to the bush every few months (hundreds of miles away, off the road system) and planes have a sad way of falling out of the sky sometimes. Snowgos break down. People get lost. Being able to make a reliable fire can make the difference in survival! We made fire starters similar to yours, but included pill bottles with cosmetic cotton balls that had been rubbed in a little petroleum jelly (such as Vaseline). Those can be packed into the pill bottle, then spread out a little by hand. Then the challenge was to start their fires with magnesium strikers! They're waterproof, inexpensive, and easy to carry …

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    Very nice instructable, great photos; thanks. When I was teaching in inner city study skills classes I taught a comprehensive unit on winter outdoor survival because so many of my students flew to the bush every few months (hundreds of miles away, off the road system) and planes have a sad way of falling out of the sky sometimes. Snowgos break down. People get lost. Being able to make a reliable fire can make the difference in survival! We made fire starters similar to yours, but included pill bottles with cosmetic cotton balls that had been rubbed in a little petroleum jelly (such as Vaseline). Those can be packed into the pill bottle, then spread out a little by hand. Then the challenge was to start their fires with magnesium strikers! They're waterproof, inexpensive, and easy to carry in a parka pocket. (Interestingly, no male teachers were ever brave enough to go with us!)I took small groups of city kids winter camping and had them start fires without matches, etc., then cook dinner and breakfast on their own fires. They returned home and to school with a new sense of capability, and at least a couple of them testified that they had only been able to return from later trips because they had mastered these fire building and survival skills.Thank you for reminding us of this important project!

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  • Alaskan Bev commented on JasonF205's instructable Milk Jug Skulls

    Funny!

    Excellent 'ible, great photos. Thx. Question: are you using blue masking tape? I've never seen that. It looks more like painter's tape, which I use a lot. Whatever it is, does it work as well as the plain old tan-ish masking tape that we all use by the truckload?

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  • When I first glanced at the picture I thought it was about How to Make a Harmonica! Our cat would prefer a harmonica to a grooming tool any day! She hates being brushed in any fashion, but maybe if I build her one of these... Great 'ible!

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