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      • Heavy Duty Corner Clamps
      • Turning Stainless Steel Bolt Into Pneumatic Engraver
      • Stainless Steel Gate for Workshop
  • Turning Stainless Steel Bolt Into Pneumatic Engraver

    Obviously great workmanship. Kudos! And thank you for sharing.Let me see if I have this right... how the compressor was modified, and how the engraving tool was constructed and operates. I've added some numbers to paragraphs to make it easier to discuss when you correct me. And ..., there is a question at the end, with some thoughts about how I might have misunderstood that you might choose to tell me how I am wrong Anyway, here goes: 1, Just to establish terminology: Normally, your air compressor would suck air in via a 1-way flap through an inlet port into a compression chamber during a suction stroke and then in a compression stroke, compresses the air in the compression chamber the (during which time air cannot escape out the inlet port because of the flap. The outlet port …

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    Obviously great workmanship. Kudos! And thank you for sharing.Let me see if I have this right... how the compressor was modified, and how the engraving tool was constructed and operates. I've added some numbers to paragraphs to make it easier to discuss when you correct me. And ..., there is a question at the end, with some thoughts about how I might have misunderstood that you might choose to tell me how I am wrong Anyway, here goes: 1, Just to establish terminology: Normally, your air compressor would suck air in via a 1-way flap through an inlet port into a compression chamber during a suction stroke and then in a compression stroke, compresses the air in the compression chamber the (during which time air cannot escape out the inlet port because of the flap. The outlet port has a has a check valve (one-way, or non-return valve) which prevents the air from going out of the compressor's hose back into the compressor. When air pressure in the compression chamber becomes higher than the air pressure in the hose, the check valve opens, and the compressed air would leave the compression chamber and enter the hose.2. If I understand it correctly, you have modified the air compressor in this way: a) you have glued down the flap over the inlet port, so air cannot get in or out of the compressor through the inlet port; b) you have removed the check valve on the outlet. port. Thus, the compressor discharges whatever air is inside the compression chamber into the hose on the compression stroke, and then SUCKS air from the hose back into the compression chamber. Thus, the pressure in the hose varies between positive pressure (above atmospheric) and vacuum (below atmospheric pressure)..3. Inside the graver, there is a cylinder (the rear hole drilled in the barrel in step 1) that is closed at a first end by the handle threaded onto the outside threads of the barrel. The first end of the cylinder connects via the fitting in the handle to the hose. The second end of the cylinder is connected to the smaller diameter front hole (also drilled in step 1). The length of the cylinder can by varied by screwing the handle in or out along the threads of the main body. Pressure in the first end of the cylinder thus matches that of the hose. 4. There is a piston {made in step 8) that free floats (is not connected to anything), with a large head on a first end that has an oil seal with the cylinder wall, and a reduced diameter portion on a second end that fits into the front hole at the tool end of the graver. The first end of the piston is acted on by the variable pressure at the first end of the cylinder The second end of the piston is at atmospheric pressure due to the at least two breathing holes drilled into the front hole .in step 2. The difference in pressure between the first end of the piston and the second end of the piston causes it to move upward toward the first end of the cylinder, when the compressor is sucking air out of the hose, and downward toward the second end of the cylinder when compressor is sending air back into the hose.5. Again, if I understand it correctly, the graver holder free floats in the front hole, but the force of the user pressing down on the tool will mean that the graver holder will be urged relatively toward the cylinder during use when not acted on by the piston., The graver holder threads do not screw into anything, they just act as a bearing surface guiding on the walls of the front hole to keep the graving tool aligned in the first hole (the thread points are a low friction bearing surface compared to a smooth, tight fitting cylindrical surface, which would have lots of contact surface with the walls of the front hole). 6. In operation, as I understand it, the when the piston retracts toward the first (upper end) of the cylinder, the graving tool holder can only follow it a short distance before the large portion of it (the head of the allen socket screw from which it was made) bears against the bottom of the barrel. A gap will open up between the graver holder and the piston, the size of which is determined by how much the handle is screwed down the barrel. Then, when the compressor goes into its compression stroke and pressurizes the first end of the cylinder above atmospheric pressure, the piston will be driven toward the second end of the cylinder, and the reduced diameter portion of the piston in the front hole will strike the graver holder just before the piston reaches full stroke. This causes the graver holder, and the graver to move away from the piston and engrave the workpiece. The amount of force with which the piston strikes the graver holder increases as the cylinder length and size is increased by screwing the handle outwardly on the barrel, and I suppose, allows for deeper engraving into the work piece.At least that's how I understand it. But I'm not sure I understand it fully, because it seems that although one would have a trapped volume of air when you connect the hose to the fitting on the handle, and thus the air would move back and forth between compression chamber in the compressor and the cylinder in the tool... there will be leaks... there is only a film of oil sealing the piston to the cylinder walls in the tool How is that air leakage made up? I can think of 3 possibilities:A) Perhaps I misunderstood what was done to the inlet port, and you just restricted the air flow into the inlet, so that MOST of the air drawn into the compression chamber of the compressor would come from the hose and tool, and just enough air to make up for leakage is drawn in?B} Or maybe... you just stops every once in a while, to unplug the hose and reestablish the correct volume of air in the system?C} Or, since air can leak the other way past the piston, too when the hose is below atmospheric pressure, leakage isn't an issue, and what leaks out, leaks back in.

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  • DIY Budget Moxon Vise

    I agree. I'm intrigued by his workbench... how that's put together would be a great instructable...

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  • DIY Budget Moxon Vise

    But... doesn't show it awfully well.

    1. Why wouldn't you also glue the clamping board to the back, instead of just relying on 3 brass screws, so as to spread out stress induced in use over the whole contact area instead of just along three contact points (which, being in line, would seem to be more likely to split the wood along the grain line)? Or put the screws out of a single line?. If you did glue, of course do that step before putting finish on these components.2. It looks like the clamping board is held to the workbench by clamps that are sticking up through slots in the workbench top. Details of how those slots are constructed, and the adjacent surfaces' structural support can be integrated into a workbench structure would be appreciated by those with less experience. Of course, it would seem that the cla…

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    1. Why wouldn't you also glue the clamping board to the back, instead of just relying on 3 brass screws, so as to spread out stress induced in use over the whole contact area instead of just along three contact points (which, being in line, would seem to be more likely to split the wood along the grain line)? Or put the screws out of a single line?. If you did glue, of course do that step before putting finish on these components.2. It looks like the clamping board is held to the workbench by clamps that are sticking up through slots in the workbench top. Details of how those slots are constructed, and the adjacent surfaces' structural support can be integrated into a workbench structure would be appreciated by those with less experience. Of course, it would seem that the clamping board could also be held down by dog clamps if the workbench top is provided with dog holes. Or many other arrangements. But I would be interested in seeing how you did it.3. Very nice craftsmanship!

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  • Clackers: the Toy of Doom

    You forgot to include a 16 page (legal paper size, 1.5 line spaced) disclaimer of liability in the event anyone is injured using this device .... even if the injury is due to a parent, significant other, or cubicle mate throwing something at said user, sriking said user with a body part or with a hand-held object, or causing the death or serious bodily injury of said user through manual or ligature strangulation to stop such use of the aforesaid device, since such an injury is a forseeable and ordinary consequence of the use of such aforesaid device.

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  • Scrap Wood Projects - Impossible Golf Ball and the Cube Inside a Cube

    And for the master class: A golf ball inside a block of wood, inside a cube.Nice 'ible

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  • Comic Book Display Cabinet

    Very nice project, well explained. But of course, like many people, it immediately triggered regret... I see that the value of that Daredevil #1 that I bought in the comic book store, new, in 1964 is now worth up to $58,000... except that mine probably went into the trash in 1965.

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  • AllenInks commented on runciblefish's instructable Firenado Lamp
    Firenado Lamp

    Especially when you are having guests over, it would probably be a good idea to have an APPROPRIATE extinguisher discretely nearby. You should be able to find an MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) for whatever fuel source you are using. For alcohol, I believe (but am not positive... so check) that a SPRAY bottle of water (set for spray, not stream) would normally do the trick for a small container/spill.

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  • AllenInks commented on peterbrazil's instructable Rat Rod Mower Kart

    I'm thinking a Roots supercharger as a future mod...

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  • Some of the 110v outlets in my house are rated for 15 amps, are wired with 14 AWG wire (though occasionally 12 AWG wire), and protected by 15 amp circuit breakers. However MOST (over 90 percent) are rated for 20 amps, are wired with 12 AWG wire, and protected by 20 Amp circuit breakers. In the shop and garage, they are all 20 amp outlets, because... yeah, tools draw more power than cell phone chargers.

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  • You have an upper half and a lower half of the domes, but no step cutting them in half that I saw. It seems that this step: "take your baked meringue domes and hollow them out with a spoon." should read as "take your baked meringue domes, cut them in half horizontally with a serrated knife, and hollow them out with a spoon."

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  • You say Marvel; I say Hanna-Barbera: BAM! BAM! BAMBAMBAM!!!!

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  • Instead of screws by themselves, use the screws to attach blocks of wood to your wooden sheet. These blockswill support the screw against bending, transforming the bending moment on the screws into a pure shear force acting at the plane of the sheet and the block, which the screw can easily withstand. To prevent the tubing from slipping up and over the blocks, add a second , slightly larger piece of scrap plywood on top of each block (attached with same screws as the underlying block) to form a lip overlying the face of the block that will bear against the tubing.

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  • AllenInks commented on darbinorvar's instructable Bluetooth Speaker

    Beautiful workmanship.Some mods I'm thinking about: 1. Including a battery pack, so the speaker can be used without the power dongle I know the speaker is not as mobile as some small plastic one, but it would be nice to occasionally move it to different areas of the hangar I work in without having to find a power outlet.2. Making the power cord less obvious by moving the power inlet plug to the back panel, and including extra wire internally, and soldering male and female 2-pole plug pair into that length of extra wire. With this arrangement, I could still remove the back panel, then stretch out the extra internal length of wire and unplug the internal wire from the internal speaker electronics. Thoughts?

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  • I've seen many hardware stores with fewer kinds of clamps, and fewer numbers overall. No wonder you need that rack! Very nice build.Are you planning to do any kind of painting, staining, edge banding, laser engraving? Will you do RFID clamp inventory onboard monitoring, or will you just make do with strain gages monitoring total weight on each of the wheels, and identify which clamps have been removed and not returned just by weight changes? (LOL... I jest; some of these instructables are just too....too!)

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  • Step 1, find an aluminum ball of desired size.Step 2, wrap in aluminum foil.Step 3, tear off aluminum foil, and put it in recycling bin.Step 4. Polish aluminum ball.Step 5. Enjoy!

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  • AllenInks commented on MakeHaven's instructable Casting Coasters

    Or metal (aluminum??)

    Instead of using wood for the master mold, is there a reason not use a material with a more uniform matrix... like a plastic sheet material (acrylic, nylon, polycarbonate), or plaster of paris... to try to avoid tear-out, etc. that can occur with wood.

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  • I wonder if it might not be better to attach the jar lids to their supports BEFORE doing any other fabrication on the supports (drilling ends for bearing attachment; assembly into structure). First, it would be easier to screw the lids to the support if the supports were flat on a workbench. Second, if the support should split, which can happen when iscrewing in several fasteners in a row in a very narrow wooden member, it is much easier to replace with another piece of wood.

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  • AllenInks commented on tlp801's instructable 2x4 Mega Bench

    I have Masonite tops, but they are screwed on using countersunk flat top screws. Never had a problem hitting a screw with a plane or other tool. And this arrangement makes it easier to flip over the Masonite when the first upward facing surface gets all buggered up, and then use the other surface for a few years. Not sure you could do that if the Masonite is glued down.The only problem is ... it doesn't look as nice as the varnished 2x4s.

    or hardboard (Masonite), which doesn't splinter when gouged.

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  • I didn't see anything said about balance... Other places I've seen a 50-50 split of weight between handle and blade. But... there's not a big differentiation between blade and handle on your knife anyway. Do you have any thoughts on the matter

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  • Soooo... did a naval architect review your construction? It seems that the walls were constructed very similar to a house on land - and it seems that one wave over the stern would wash it all away. Of course, I realize that this is not an "overhauled" tug, but rather a

    Soooo... did a naval architect review your construction? It seems that the walls were constructed very similar to a house on land, and not like a sea-going boat - it seems that one wave over the stern would wash it all away. Of course, I realize that this is not an "overhauled" tug, but rather a conversion to a house boat, but you did put engines in it for a reason... presumably you expect not to remain chained to a pier.A lot of work... it looks nice inside!

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