author

ArthurJ5

Inbox View Profile
151Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Achievements

100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
  • Rattling Tree Spirits (Princess Mononoke)

    That’s really cool. I always wanted some in the garden. I got derailed by the Cream of Cornish. :p

    View Instructable »
  • Ultimate Soup Bombs!

    That looks fun! I want to try it with clam chowder.For Halloween dye the bread orange and fill with split pea soup!

    View Instructable »
  • Adding a Dust Collection System

    One nit. The electricity will be carried on the outside of the PVC pipe. In a dry environment like where I live I’ve been shocked by my shop vac too many times to count. My shop vac has not exploded yet. I also got shocked by blowing light snow off the sidewalk with my leaf blower, it took me a while to figure that one out! So, the electric charge develops on the outside of the insulator and like lightning hitting a car the charge travels around the outside not through the pipe. Running a conductor through the middle of the pipe does nothing because the charge is on the outside of the pipe.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on -BALES-'s instructable Router Drum Mill
    Router Drum Mill

    That is great! I need one for making banjos. Thanks for sharing.

    View Instructable »
  • Nail in Solid Brick Puzzle

    I like the brick idea. Also, as a woodworker I like to see how other materials are machined and used. Maybe I’ll put a brick puzzle in the coffee tabiles I build.

    View Instructable »
  • No-Fail Metal Plating With Kitchen Chemistry

    I’ve been looking for a relatively safe way to do this for a long time. I have some tools where the nickel plate has worn off and the underlying steel is now rusting. Do you think this method would be sturdy enough for hand tools?

    That was kind of a silly question. I mean, if it’s good enough for Thor’s hammer it should be good enough for a hand plane. ;-)

    View Instructable »
  • Pork Schnitzel With a Traditional Potato & Mayonnaise Salad

    For any hunters out there, my wife makes schnitzel out of pronghorn. Jager of course. And it’s really good. =p,

    Yes similar. Reminds me of lamb or goat.

    View Instructable »
  • Greenhouse Extension - Making a Safe Living, Nesting & Brooding Area for Organic Coturnix Quail

    Wow, that’s just great. Wonderful job on building your garden. I’ve often wanted to build a hutch for our wild quail. I’m not sure they would like it though. Even with predators around they seem to prefer the low shrubbery and probably wouldn’t move in. They do run through the fence to get away from the coyotes but it doesn’t take a coyote long to figure out how to jump a fence.On a side note, my son grew out his beard and has a striking resemblance to the statue of Rollo.

    View Instructable »
  • WheeStroll- Wheelchair Stroller Attachment

    That is a beautiful thing! Maybe add some ballast to the rear to counter the weight of the baby?

    View Instructable »
  • The Backyard Rabbit (or Quail) Coop

    They do come out in the daytime. I had a couple of young ones in the scrub oak, just running around and playing. Up the tree, down the tree, chattering like crazy until their mom made them settle down with a couple of good screeches. They are cute but good grief they are troublesome. Hope your dogs are OK!

    View Instructable »
  • DIY Acoustic Smartphone Amplifier (Wooden Passive  Speaker)

    Clever idea. An acoustic amplifier is called a horn. Generally speaking, the bigger the horn the more bass it will produce.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on Dizzle813's instructable Nintoaster Build
    Nintoaster Build

    Cool. I have an old toaster, I might make a phone charger. Hmmm…

    View Instructable »
  • Solar Powered Rotating Strawberry Tower

    You don’t need the overly complicated spinning mechanism. Get a swivel from your local hardware store; they are sold by the rope and chain section. Then simply give your strawberry tower a bit of a turn every day.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on 20MinuteTech's instructable Madame Leota Box
    Madame Leota Box

    That is fantastic! Now, to make Holly from Red Dwarf …

    View Instructable »
  • Building a Smoker Pit - EVERYTHING You Need to Know!

    Great instructable! There is a ton of useful information in here. Thanks, and happy smoking.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on mikesell_52's instructable Smoked Armadillo Eggs
    Smoked Armadillo Eggs

    Those look soooooo good! For Thanksgiving you can stuff one in a duck and stuff that into a turkey for a turduckillo.

    Since I’m a cheap, umm, frugal person I use my grill to smoke. Check the Internets for more guidance, but the basics are to put the charcoal towards the back, meat in front, and control the air flow. Add some hickory or mesquite chips for flavor. You could skip smoking all together and mix in some liquid smoke and cook them in the oven or (gasp!) on a propane grill.Good luck! These armadillos look great. I want some for breakfast! =p

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on rachel's instructable Dr Seuss Inspired Desk
    Dr Seuss Inspired Desk

    WOW! That is fantastic. I wouldn’t even know where to begin on a project like that, most everything I make is square. That’s just beautiful. Also, even though you used a CNC it wasn’t a model kit where you cut it out, glue it together, all done! Your project really brings out my inner child. I always liked the Chuck Jones Bugs Bunny cartoon with Witch Hazel, I wanted a house like hers with all the crooked doors and windows, absolutely nothing was square or plumb.Good job! Enjoy your desk, I sure did.

    View Instructable »
  • DIY Multi-Leveled Jewelry Box With Exotic Wood

    Cutting off the lid without supporting the sides of the box is simply inviting an accident or ruining all of your good work up to that point. Don’t rely on your sons super power grip, it’s no match for the power of a table saw. All of the cuts in your instructable were done without a guard or push stick on a saw that is positioned too high for the operator.That is a beautiful box. Is it worth a finger or an eye?

    View Instructable »
  • Tree Slab Lounge Table With Rgb Led Lights

    I would have put a butterfly across the crack, but that’s my thing. I like butterflies. I’ve seen other craftsman’s work where they used rail road spikes or contrasting aluminum.

    View Instructable »
  • How to Mill Rough Lumber With No Jointer

    I use my bandsaw all the time to cut boards to just over size. (Use a wide blade and make sure your fence is set-up correctly to cut straight) Then I use hand planes, usually a jack to remove tooth marks and make them square and flat. I make fretboards all the time this way, it saves material and is far less noisey. A hand sander can be far too aggressive and hard to control with the precision required for squaring a board.

    View Instructable »
  • Japanese Barstool With Tusk and Tenon Joint

    That’s beautiful! And, sometimes it’s good to be lucky. I have some walnut from an old walnut farm and want to make one or two of these cool contemplation stools. I might use through mortice and tenon with wedges on the top. I have to contemplate that.My kids think ‘BM Sculptures’ making a stool is just hysterical. They just get the galloping happies and giggle, laugh and snort for about twenty minutes. Then I send them to bed.

    View Instructable »
  • Restoring a Stanley Bailey 4 1/5 Hand Plane

    Good work! I really like the handles, I don’t like the original lacquer finish it makes the handles too slippery. I have to add to your comment on the screws, Stanley used proprietary screw sizes to differentiate his planes from other manufacand to make carpenters dependent on his company. I have on two occasions drilled out and tapped in modern screws. Once because the threads were worn out and another because I wasn’t going to pay $25 for an antique thumb screw. None of my planes are collectible I use them every weekend, so don’t freak-out.

    I was taught that too, however I always put my planes blade down on the bench, that way I can’t chip the blade with a chisel or other hard object, and I can’t cut myself on the plane. It kind of like burying your ax in the stump. Besides, planes were meant to cut wood and the steel is hard. If you have no nails in your bench top I recommend blade down. Also, I don’t have to retract the blade and reset it as often. Just my thoughts, do what works for you.

    I’m in the process of moving right now, so I can’t send you any pictures of my ‘restored’ hand planes. In a couple of weeks, if I remember, I’ll post some.I have a couple of WWII Stanley planes, I think they are from the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. I like them because they are a bit heavier than the other eras’ planes. My 4 1/2 is a beast, it has a heaver casting, cherry wood tote and a Bakelite adjustment knob. I guess Stanley used whatever wood was available because it has a cocobolo front knob. Where did they find that?On the other hand, I have an early No. 3 that has a thin casting and is just great for those smaller jobs. This is the one with the wallered-out screw holes for the frog.Gotta go make some sawdust!

    View Instructable »
  • CNC-machined Wooden Egg Speakers

    Those look great! How do they sound compared to a traditional rectangular box? One thing loudspeaker designers have been leaving out for years is edge diffraction off those pointy corners and the time and phase distortion it introduces. They’re really cool, don’t crack them.

    View Instructable »
  • Making the Selmer Guitar II

    This is great work and a unique instrument resulted from it. I have some reservations as to the woodworking aspect, but what you did resulted in a fine instrument. Maybe you should enter the CNC contest? What you built and the way you did it isn’t completely CNC either, but I think you will walk away with a prize. Just a thought.

    View Instructable »
  • Wood Mallet With Copper Inlays

    I have to agree with your comment. I would never put materials of contrasting hardness on the face of a mallet. One thought I had was, that’s a good way to split a chisel handle. Other than that they are beautiful, well made, and should command a good price even if they are never used.

    View Instructable »
  • Make Cutting Boards With Minimal Tools

    Take a 1”x4”x8 feet long board. When you look at the cut end 1x4” that is the end grain, at both ends of the board. The four inch by 8 feet width is face grain, the widest part of the board is the face. The thin one inch by 8 feet part is edge grain, the longest and thinnest part of the board on the edge. Make sense? So, face grain has most of the figure of the board and is quite attractive. It’s good for slicing but not chopping. The attractive face grain of oak is deep and can keep food particles stuck in it which can rot. Eeeeww! Edge grain is good for making stripes or laminating strips of alternating woods. I wouldn’t use oak for this either, the grain is just as deep as the face grain. The good thing is you can alternate stripes of maple, cherry, and walnut to good effect.…

    see more »

    Take a 1”x4”x8 feet long board. When you look at the cut end 1x4” that is the end grain, at both ends of the board. The four inch by 8 feet width is face grain, the widest part of the board is the face. The thin one inch by 8 feet part is edge grain, the longest and thinnest part of the board on the edge. Make sense? So, face grain has most of the figure of the board and is quite attractive. It’s good for slicing but not chopping. The attractive face grain of oak is deep and can keep food particles stuck in it which can rot. Eeeeww! Edge grain is good for making stripes or laminating strips of alternating woods. I wouldn’t use oak for this either, the grain is just as deep as the face grain. The good thing is you can alternate stripes of maple, cherry, and walnut to good effect.End grain is maybe not so attractive as face grain and can ‘catch’ your knife while slicing food. However, it is the absolute best choice for chopping and can to some degree heal itself, face grain will splinter with chopping.

    View Instructable »
  • Make Cutting Boards With Minimal Tools

    Ooo, I can answer that, the face grain of oak has a very deep cellular structure that can hold food debris. One thing I did with my oak is to make trivets for the hot spaghetti pots. A trivet is simply a cutting board with feet. Keep them oiled and waxed and maybe put a doily on it for really hot pots.

    View Instructable »
  • How to Make Charcuterie Boards Using Clear Acrylic Templates

    Climb cutting is a technique that can give you a superior finish reducing tear-out significantly. I use it all the time when putting banding on a guitar to keep the spruce tops from splitting. The technique is to always go down hill following the curves of the guitar. If you standard cut counter clockwise all the way around a guitar you will end up with a very expensive set of toothpicks. The thing that makes climb cutting work well is to take very light passes and take your time. Sometimes I use it where the grain reverses on a board. It’s a technique that you have to practice to get the feel for it. It can be absolutely frightening if you do it wrong. Now I just do it instinctively.Never climb cut a thick board on a router table. Ever! Good way to bust a window and loose a fing…

    see more »

    Climb cutting is a technique that can give you a superior finish reducing tear-out significantly. I use it all the time when putting banding on a guitar to keep the spruce tops from splitting. The technique is to always go down hill following the curves of the guitar. If you standard cut counter clockwise all the way around a guitar you will end up with a very expensive set of toothpicks. The thing that makes climb cutting work well is to take very light passes and take your time. Sometimes I use it where the grain reverses on a board. It’s a technique that you have to practice to get the feel for it. It can be absolutely frightening if you do it wrong. Now I just do it instinctively.Never climb cut a thick board on a router table. Ever! Good way to bust a window and loose a finger. You don’t want your friends calling you Stumpy.One rule of thumb for conventional routing is to route right. For the inside of a circle imagine standing in the center of the circle. Spiral bits help a lot to get a smooth finish.Good job! I need to look up that finish.

    View Instructable »
  • Altair - a Tripod Mounted Refracting Telescope

    They have really good lenses and they are expensive. I could go buy a telescope for what they are asking. They have really good glass.I still have my red Astroscan!

    View Instructable »
  • Altair - a Tripod Mounted Refracting Telescope

    I have a friend that bought a 12 inch f4 lens from a surplus store in Albuquerque, it was originally from Sandia Laboratory. He made the coolest stubby refractor from that.OK, Imback to step 4!

    View Instructable »
  • Altair - a Tripod Mounted Refracting Telescope

    This is an exceptional Instructable. However, whenever I read one of these telescope projects a lens shows up from someones basement or from a garage sale somewhere near a national laboratory. Where can I simply buy one? Most of us have day jobs and can’t roam across the country looking for a six inch f-10 lens in a yard sale. I’ve been wanting to make a telescope for years but I can’t find the most important bit, the lens. Dobs are much easier, but I don’t want a Dob.OK, two thumbs up for the instructable. I just wish their was a supplier for good lenses.

    View Instructable »
  • A Modern Bandsaw Reindeer

    Hard to make that into an ash tray. Showing my age again. :-)

    View Instructable »
  • Easy Plywood Holiday Decorations

    Great idea! I’m all over it like a monkey on a football. I have a lot of scraps and never a good idea other than throw them in the fire. This is just the thing I needed. Thanks!

    View Instructable »
  • Plywood Bundt Pan Banjo (Bundt-Jo)

    That’s a really cool idea. Great job. The best part is you can be playing panjo quickly.

    View Instructable »
  • It's Dead Blow Hammer Time

    Thanks! I plan on making some and experimenting with different sizes. Maybe using adapters to gain more length to secure the handle a bit better. Remember it's not only the strength or energy of the strike but the longevity of the tool after many small strikes. I need a small hammer for guitar frets and a big one for timber work.I think rubber bottle stoppers from wine makers might work, or cast my own from epoxy or caulk instead of buying a 3D printer.

    View Instructable »
  • It's Dead Blow Hammer Time

    It simply screws on. I don’t know if that’s secure enough for a hammer. You could epoxy it or drill a hole and run a brass rod through and peen it over.

    View Instructable »
      • How to Cut Circles - 4 Methods
      • 45 Degree Table Saw Sled
      • Workshop Pull-out Storage
  • How to Cut Circles - 4 Methods

    That’s genius! Thanks for the link!

    Wow! You are one industrious young lady! I’m checking out your other instructables, there is a lot of info there. If you aren’t a teacher you should be... well actually you are. I’m really impressed that you do such good work and take the time to produce instructables.

    I use double sided tape. You have to use a router base as thick as the taped on pivot block or you could use a large circle as your base. In either case you need to take into account the length of your router bit. One thing I did once was to rout a diamond inlay over the pivot hole.

    The circle jig is your friend. I do this all the time while speaker building. The difference is you throw the circles in the wood stove and keep the outside with the holes in it. If you buy a commercial jig remember you want to use the outside dimension as your radius or the hole will be too big. I use double sided tape to stick the workpiece to a scrap piece of plywood otherwise when you cut through you could have flying bits.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on -BALES-'s instructable Table Saw Drum Mill
    Table Saw Drum Mill

    My jigs are nothing special. Just a couple of circle cutting jigs, they are nothing like your set-up. I cut the rough circle on the band saw, then use a plunge router and a circle cutting jig to trim the outside smooth. The good thing about using a router is I get a great finish ready for light sanding. Then I use the same set-up for the inside of the ring. For deep cuts I start with the circle cutting jig then go to the router table and use bearing guided bits. I like your jig because it doesn’t require so many set-ups and I could make several banjo bodies at once. I’m anxiously awaiting your inside cutting jig instructable.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on -BALES-'s instructable Table Saw Drum Mill
    Table Saw Drum Mill

    I need to get me one of these! Wow, great instructable. I make banjos and this jig would be perfect for shaping the case, actually multiple cases at once. I normally use a band saw and a router in a series of jigs.

    View Instructable »
      • A Much Safer Table Saw Taper Jig
      • Beautiful Natural Bird Bath
      • Laptop Riser
  • Kanna - Japanese Woodworking Plane

    That’s a very interesting instructable, good job! I’ve made many planes usually western style. The Japanese plane you show here is so elegantly simple I’m going to have to make one or two. Below is one of my better planes, a coffin smoother with a high angle for tough grain. It’s made from a heavy piece of Brazilian cherry.

    View Instructable »
  • The Backyard Rabbit (or Quail) Coop

    Wow that’s great work! I was thinking about having some chickens, but now I have to consider quail, chuckar, and other birds. Hmmm... lots to think about there. I hope you have some raccoon defenses like a big yaller dog. With the hands raccoons have they can do horrible damage to your birds and bunnies. Foxes can’t reach through the wire and grab your birds, but they will chew and claw until the sun comes up. Raccoons are cute but they are also hungry greedy animals. Be vigilant!Sorry for the downer, that’s a lot of work and a great job, and I’m going to make one.

    View Instructable »
  • Make a Plaid Cutting Board

    I have friends who like to do that. They mill a lot of ash and elm which I turn into guitar bodies. For the cost of some pizza and beer I get some good lumber, and can make a decent profit making Tele knock offs.

    View Instructable »
  • Make a Plaid Cutting Board

    You have to find a distributor. I have one in my town that advertises as an unfinished furniture store, so get on google and do some searching. You can try the usual tool dealers, Woodcr@ft and R0ckler. Also, you may have to drive to a bigger city to find a good selection of hard wood. You can order thru the mail but the shipping might be a lot. The last option is to harvest your own, or go to the county dump where downed trees go to be recycled or even put in the land fill. Oh, and don’t ever make a cutting board out of pine!

    View Instructable »
  • Make a Pocket Watch From a Wristwatch

    This is a great idea! I just stuff my watch into my pocket. I’ve seen what happens when a watch or ring gets caught in machinery. It’s not pretty. For some reason I’m hankering for some corn chips....

    View Instructable »
  • Cigar Box Guitar | Corona Edition

    Thanks. It sold quickly, I should have asked for more. =D

    Ok, you asked for it ;) It’s a walnut neck with a brass nut. I kept the shavings from cutting the nut and made a sparkly 12th fret marker, I’m always improvising. The string retainers are 9mm shells (primers removed) soldered together. The bridge was a handle from one of my shop cabinets — the sacrifices I make for my art! The knobs are from Tincup whisky. =P, I used a 1/2” X 1/8” steel rod to stiffen the neck. Oh, since I had the 9mm thing going on I used gunstock oil as the finish. It’s a really easy finish to work with and also easy to fix scratches.One of these days I’ll sit down and write an instructable.

    View Instructable »
  • Cigar Box Guitar | Corona Edition

    I make these all the time with whatever valuable junk I have on hand. It’s a great way to repurpose old hardware and bottle tops.

    View Instructable »
  • Thin Strip Jig for the Table Saw

    Looks perfect for making fretboards. Thanks for a great idea!

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on WilliamD44's instructable Speaker Build
    Speaker Build

    A Panaray! Awesome. Bose still makes those, so it must be a good design. You do need the equalizer for full range sound, it boosts the bass by 10db and the treble by 15! The EQ does cut the low bass response, but for a garage they should be great!

    View Instructable »
  • Making the ULTIMATE Drill Guide With CNC Parts

    That’s beautiful, good instructable. One idea I had was to make some angled bases so you could drill accurate angles. Most of the holes I drill are 90 degrees, so I wouldn’t make wedges until I needed them.

    View Instructable »
  • Leather Gramophone Horn, Passive Smart Phone Amplifier

    That really is beautiful! About the tinny sound, the frequency response of a horn isn’t so much dependent on material as dimensions of the horn. For bass you need a longer section of pipe, a lot longer. Think about a tuba, they have 16’ of pipe, french horn has 12, trombone 8’ and trumpet has 4’. Now to get it to amplify the sound and play louder you need a larger bell. Think about the tuba again, the great big bell helps the tuba player to keep up with the rest of the orchestra. I don’t know about your wife, but mine wouldn’t stand for a 16 foot long by 6 foot round horn in her kitchen.

    View Instructable »
  • Adjustable Shelving for Part Bin Organizers

    This is a great idea. I have an absolute mess of parts bins scattered everywhere. I think I’ll make several rather than one big one, one for wood screws, one for nuts and bolts, and one for electronics. I’ll use my dado set and cut the dadoes first then rip the plywood. Also for working cabinets that get slammed around, I prefer rabbets, glue, and a brad nailer. It’s faster for me and the cabinet ends up stronger. Oh, the glued shelves are critical! I built one like this without the glued in shelves and it bowed-out in the middle and parts went everywhere.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on Ham-made's instructable Electric Tenor Guitar
    Electric Tenor Guitar

    Good job! I’m going to ‘borrow’ that guitar shape for a slide guitar. Tenor guitars started out as a banjo neck on a guitar body. It was a transition period from Dixie Land style and Big Band swing that forced banjo players to the more sophisticated guitar. You might want to make a strum-stick, a dulcimer with a neck. I made one and it’s loads of fun. An electric one would be even more funner. Oh, and thanks for using spokeshaves! I often see guitar builders using rasps or even angle grinders. Gasp! I can shape a guitar neck with spokeshaves in a matter of hours, without the dust and noise. The only thing I do to my spokeshaves is add a new thicker blade. The antique Stanley 53 (see picture) with the adjustable mouth is the best, of course your mileage may vary.

    View Instructable »
  • Layered Birthday Cake for Your Dog!

    Happy birthday! Great way to spoil your puppy.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on Layer 8's instructable Cook (rocket) Stove
    Cook (rocket) Stove

    I thought that too. When I saw he appears to be cooking on galvanized plate steel I got greatly concerned. Please do not cook with galvanized material! The fumes are dangerous and if you cook tomatoes, or with wine and salt, the poison on the food goes straight to your liver. Use plain steel and replace your cooking surface. It’s a shame because that is a really nice cooker!

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on Honus's instructable Open Frame Mini ITX PC
    Open Frame Mini ITX PC

    Word of caution, we wary of buying graphics cards off of ebay. Many of the top end cards have been used and abused mining bitcoin.

    View Instructable »
  • How I Made the Most Advanced Flashlight Ever

    This gets my vote! At first I thought it would be yet another 3d printed no real skill, or far too much effort for meh, type of project. However, this project is absolutely brilliant and the result is quite useful. Great job! And, keep mentoring those kids, they are our future.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on imwoody36's instructable Prius Hot Rod
    Prius Hot Rod

    Me too! I always wanted to put a 350 in a Volvo station wagon. I never had the cash or time.

    View Instructable »
  • Tuna-Fish, the Ironing-Board Electric Guitar

    Really cool! I like your pick up winding, umm, jig.

    Really cool! I like your pick up winding, umm, jig.

    View Instructable »
  • FindyBot3000 - a Voice Controlled Organizer

    As a system architect and now an enterprise architect, I love the UML! Really good Instructable!

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 made the instructable Custom Tool Wall
    Custom Tool Wall

    I started with a wall like yours but soon my collection of antique tools forced me to expand to cabinets. With the cabinets closed I can get to carpentry tools, with the cabinet doors open I have access to cabinetry tools. Under the cabinets are shelves with my power tools. Plan for expansion, looks like I’ve no more room. Turn your hammers 90 degrees and you can buy a couple more. Planning the layout is real important but if you panel the wall with 1/2” ply (no pegboards!) you can move tools around easily with your screwdriver. I keep woodworking areas away from metalworking areas. It helps to keep the oil and filings away from the wood, preventing stains and fish eyes on the finish.

    View Instructable »
  • Cigar Box Three String Guitar

    It’s a chisel box and tuned like a mountain dulcimer. It’s really fun to play!

    View Instructable »
  • HiFi Multi-room WiFi & Bluetooth Speaker

    Great question. I think most PC type music streaming is in stereo, it’s not separated into stereo left/right or surround 7.1. That would be great if someone has figured out how to do multi channel streaming. I’m going to do some searching on that.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on DanPro's instructable Cell Phone Gramophone
    Cell Phone Gramophone

    I was also thinking that a folded horn, about 4’ tall would provide excellent fidelity. That’s pretty big though and won’t fit on your desk. So many ideas, so little time...

    This is so awesome! I plan on building some. I’m thinking of adding power, I work long days in the garage and that would keep my iPad a rockin’. I also wonder about harmonics and bass response, bigger = more bass. Also, my iPad has two speakers.... so maybe I’ll make a double horn? Thank you so much for the inspiration!

    For hardware I go to Ace. They have almost everything. Not very much in stock but they can get it fast. They had oddball taps and screws for my amplifier project.

    That is sad that you can’t buy hardware locally. There is always McMaster Carr. They have a good selection but you will have to wait for delivery and deal with a stupid interface on their webstore. Also, you can’t bring in what you have and find one just like it. We have our troubles in the US where we didn’t go metric but we buy things from all around the world, so we need two sets of tools. I often use a monkey wrench or spanner rather than look for the correct socket. Eventually we will be metric by default.

    View Instructable »
  • Building a Guitar: Telecaster Thinline

    That’s a great job for the first guitar! I’m going to make a mahogany tele one of these days. Here is a picture of my Thinline; padauk top and back mahogany in between. The cream stripe is padauk sapwood. Yes, it’s fatter than normal. Maybe its a Chubbyline?Oh, and it is addicting as Mike said.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on cbm104's instructable Simple Wood Workbench
    Simple Wood Workbench

    I agree with medelman2, the back fence will be the first thing you cut off and plane down.Also, I hope you can move that thing because there isn’t much use for a vice next to a wall like that. If you are planing there is no room for jointing and if sawing there is nowhere to saw from, even left handed. I like the metal working vise, I recommend you put it on the near corner so that you have room for the stock and can swivel it to either corner. Mine sits by my compressor and I have to move everything around to cut any steel or copper pipe. :/Other than that, a great job and that bench will last a long time.

    View Instructable »
  • Miter Station + Storage Out of 2x4's

    Great job! I have a very similar set-up. Where did you find straight 2X4’s?

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on Natalina's instructable Build a Soundproof Wall
    Build a Soundproof Wall

    To lower the resonance you can use a layer of cement board. Guys, nock it off with the egg cartons. We are in the 21st century and there are much better options.

    No, no, no! Cardboard egg boxes are flammable and not to code. Fiberglass is a much better insulator, probably the best there is, and it really isn’t expensive.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on F_A_B_A_S's instructable How I Made My Ukelele

    After seeing your “monstrosity” I thought you should spend sometime making these cam clamps. https://www.instructables.com/DIY-Woodworking-Cam-Clamps-Plans/I made a set of short and long and use them all the time, not just for guitars. The other clamp you could make is a spool clamp, but they are for guitar making only.

    View Instructable »
  • Wow! Very well thought out and presented. I like the torsion box top, light and strong.

    View Instructable »
  • ArthurJ5 commented on WOmadeOD's instructable Make an Asian Nightstand

    Beautiful, nice work.

    View Instructable »
  • 1/2” is closer to 13mm, 1/4” is 6mm, and 1/8” is 3mm. That’s what my Robert Sorby chisels say. 9mm is .35 caliber.

    View Instructable »