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  • Soldering Wires to Wires | Soldering Basics

    Sure, go ahead and add it. I'm also grateful for the many examples of increasing quality of how to solder things together. Eric

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  • Soldering Wires to Wires | Soldering Basics

    This is a nice tutorial. Please permit me, if you will, to share this "by gosh and by golly" soldering rule I remember from making Heathkits back in prehistoric times of tubes and point-to-point soldering. 1. Practice making good mechanical connections which are the "BONES" of a joint, where solder is the "SKIN". The connection should resist moving much when a moderate amount of force is applied to it. Crimp the joint with needle nose pliers when possible to add strength. Electronic devices tend to vibrate. They are banged around, heated up (expanded) and cooled off (contracted). Leads are pulled and pushed around, so mechanical integrity of solder joints is one factor that doesn't receive enough attention.Always remember to MAKE IT STRONG BEFORE YOU …

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    This is a nice tutorial. Please permit me, if you will, to share this "by gosh and by golly" soldering rule I remember from making Heathkits back in prehistoric times of tubes and point-to-point soldering. 1. Practice making good mechanical connections which are the "BONES" of a joint, where solder is the "SKIN". The connection should resist moving much when a moderate amount of force is applied to it. Crimp the joint with needle nose pliers when possible to add strength. Electronic devices tend to vibrate. They are banged around, heated up (expanded) and cooled off (contracted). Leads are pulled and pushed around, so mechanical integrity of solder joints is one factor that doesn't receive enough attention.Always remember to MAKE IT STRONG BEFORE YOU SOLDER!

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  • Respectfully, is a bike light ever TOO bright?Several years ago I was returning home at night on my favorite bike path (no cars, and the path was about half the width of a single car lane.) I was using a standard LED bike light (powered by 2 AA batteries) which was aimed down at the path about 20 feet in front of me. (Good ground illumination at the spot, yet enough spillover to be able to see outside the spot.) An oncoming biker was approaching me at a high rate of speed. His motorcycle-style light, aimed directly into my eyes, was extremely bright. So bright, in fact, that it blinded me temporarily so I pulled over to the right, stopped and got off my bike. (I'm embarrassed to admit that some angry words were exchanged.) Somewhat dazed, I waited until I got some night vision back b…

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    Respectfully, is a bike light ever TOO bright?Several years ago I was returning home at night on my favorite bike path (no cars, and the path was about half the width of a single car lane.) I was using a standard LED bike light (powered by 2 AA batteries) which was aimed down at the path about 20 feet in front of me. (Good ground illumination at the spot, yet enough spillover to be able to see outside the spot.) An oncoming biker was approaching me at a high rate of speed. His motorcycle-style light, aimed directly into my eyes, was extremely bright. So bright, in fact, that it blinded me temporarily so I pulled over to the right, stopped and got off my bike. (I'm embarrassed to admit that some angry words were exchanged.) Somewhat dazed, I waited until I got some night vision back before continuing. Please consider that when it comes to the intensity of light and sound, more is not always better.

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