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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    I would think that leaving out the analog joystick should be fine. As you mentioned, I haven't come across any games that use it. It took me a while to get that thing working...had to swap out a defective one. If someone could recommend some games that use the joystick, I'll definitely try them out.

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  • BigGene made the instructable Think-a-Dot Replica4 months ago
    Think-a-Dot Replica

    Well, I took some time away from electronics projects to give this Instructable a try. My Think-a-Dot replica isn't perfect, but it does work quite well. I must say that printing the flip-flops turned out to be the greatest challenge. I did print them in PETG, but my printer must not be calibrated exceptionally which resulted in the small insert cylinders requiring a lot of manual filing and light grinding. Also, the base on mine is slightly uneven, which is mostly likely due to a very tiny amount of warping of either the front or back pieces. Anyway, it's quite cool as a brain game. Many thanks to the author of this Instructable!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Thanks! I don't remember any specific problems with the screen, but the analog joystick was a challenge. I had to swap out one and resolder it, because I couldn't get it to register in every direction. Also, I remember thinking that a couple of wires seemed to be "backwards" to me based on the schematic. However, the directions overall were excellent. The project just required a fair amount of time and attention to detail.

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Please provide feedback/recommendations. Any idea why thh left shoulder cup motor would be so hot??? Also, please confirm the neck motor connections as requested above. I really need to get this project completed. Thanks!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Bad motor in the left shoulder cup...probably damaged the wiring when mounting it :( I'll test some more and hopefully finish up my robot!!!

    Quick follow-up: Although the left arm is now functioning, the motor in the shoulder cup is very hot to the touch and continues to "spasm". Also, I seem to be having an issue with head movements...not sure if I have the neck connections correct. Could you please confirm which neck motor goes to which connection with a brief description (i.e. top motor goes to #X, lower motor goes to #Y). Thanks!!!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Need more help! :) Wheel issue seems to be fixed. I had a broken terminal on one of the motors that I couldn't see. Resoldered & wheels are working. Face LED matrices: I reconnected all wires, but the entire face still stays lighted up & doesn't respond to commands. I noticed something in this line of the Arduino sketch: LedControl lc = LedControl(9,10,11,4); //Pinos 9 (DIN), 10 (CLK), 11 (CS), 4 displays a serem controladosHowever, the wiring diagram PDF "robot+mk0+-+rev8_bb" shows digital pin 10 is connected to CS, while digital pin 11 is connected to CLK. Which is correct? Could that be the problem. Thanks.

    Both wheels are now working...had to resolder one terminal that broke off. Also, face is now working. I had one bad wire that needed to be replaced!!! I wanted to mention two things: the Arduino connections for CLK and CS digital pins to the first LED matrix should be switched in the PDF diagram "robot+mk0+-+rev8_bb". Also, I had to switch/reverse the wiring for the two mouth LED matrices. Based on the schematic provided, I think they needed to be switched. However, I could be wrong :)Still need to get the left arm working...something is still wrong.

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  • Controlling LED Matrix Array With Arduino Uno (Arduino Powered Robot Face)

    Still working on the bigger robot project and troubleshooting my LED face matrices. I see this guidance in your instructions: Arduino digital pin 11 = CS of the first display....Isn't CS actually connected to digital pin 10 since there is a zero "0" digital pin to account for?

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    I've made progress, but still having some issues. I reconnected all wires for the LED matrices, but it still doesn't work...all LEDs light up on the face. I'm stuck. Also, the left arm only moves half-way down, while the right up moves completely up and down. Any idea on why that would happen? When powering up the robot, what is the default/starting position for the arms...down??? Not sure about neck movements...need to test that more to see what's going on...looks like the robot is spazzing out :/Finally, for the main wheels, I switched + and - wires to get both wheels to roll forward when the up arrow is pressed on the keyboard. However, when I press the down arrow to go backwards, only the left wheel turns backwards--no action with the right wheel. Any ideas on that? Thanks again.

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Good news...I can now control the arms over wifi!!! This direction from your other instructable was critical: "With the Arduino still connected to the USB port, open the Serial monitor and reset the Arduino. It will start to code and send the commands for the ESP8266 to connect a specified Wi-Fi network. If the connection is successfull, you'll see the IP address on the serial monitor." I never knew how to find out the correct IP address. Now I just need to fix the facial LED matrices...still not working properly :( Maybe a bad wire connection among the jumpers???

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    One more follow-up. Here is the output that I received when compiling and uploading the sketch. Do you see any problems? Thanks again!Warning: Board breadboard:avr:atmega328bb doesn't define a'build.board' preference. Auto-set to: AVR_ATMEGA328BBD:\Joy Robot\Main Arduino Code\RoboAlegria\_80_Setup.ino: Infunction 'void setup()':D:\Joy Robot\Main ArduinoCode\RoboAlegria\_80_Setup.ino:50:28: warning: ISO C++ forbids converting astring constant to 'char*' [-Wwrite-strings] while (!esp8266.find("OK")){ //aguardar estabelecer conexão ^D:\Joy Robot\Main Arduino Code\RoboAlegria\_90_Loop.ino: Infunction 'void loop()':D:\Joy Robot\Main ArduinoCode\RoboAlegria\_90_Loop.ino:20:29: warning: ISO C++ forbids converting astring constant to 'char*' [-Wwrite-strings] if(esp8266.find("...

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    One more follow-up. Here is the output that I received when compiling and uploading the sketch. Do you see any problems? Thanks again!Warning: Board breadboard:avr:atmega328bb doesn't define a'build.board' preference. Auto-set to: AVR_ATMEGA328BBD:\Joy Robot\Main Arduino Code\RoboAlegria\_80_Setup.ino: Infunction 'void setup()':D:\Joy Robot\Main ArduinoCode\RoboAlegria\_80_Setup.ino:50:28: warning: ISO C++ forbids converting astring constant to 'char*' [-Wwrite-strings] while (!esp8266.find("OK")){ //aguardar estabelecer conexão ^D:\Joy Robot\Main Arduino Code\RoboAlegria\_90_Loop.ino: Infunction 'void loop()':D:\Joy Robot\Main ArduinoCode\RoboAlegria\_90_Loop.ino:20:29: warning: ISO C++ forbids converting astring constant to 'char*' [-Wwrite-strings] if(esp8266.find("+IPD,")) //se tiver recebido um dado ^D:\Joy Robot\Main ArduinoCode\RoboAlegria\_90_Loop.ino:23:23: warning: ISO C++ forbids converting astring constant to 'char*' [-Wwrite-strings] esp8266.find("?"); //corre o cursor até encontrar o comandona mensagem recebida

    Sorry to say that I'm still stuck. I successfully changed the default baud rate to 9600 and then changed the baud rate in the sketch. I checked my wiring again,but I can't find any problems. Could you please take a look at my code below to see if you notice any problems? I replaced my router SSID and password with "X" and "Y". Is the syntax correct? I'm not very familiar with the Arduino IDE...do I need all of the backward slashes (\) within the quotation marks (") ??? Thanks. //inicialização da comunicação serial Serial.begin(9600); esp8266.begin(9600); sendData("AT+RST\r\n", 2000, DEBUG); //resetar módulo sendData("AT+CWMODE=1\r\n", 1000, DEBUG); //setar modo station sendData("AT+CWJAP=\"XXXX-XXXXX\",\"YYYYYYYYYY\&q...

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    Sorry to say that I'm still stuck. I successfully changed the default baud rate to 9600 and then changed the baud rate in the sketch. I checked my wiring again,but I can't find any problems. Could you please take a look at my code below to see if you notice any problems? I replaced my router SSID and password with "X" and "Y". Is the syntax correct? I'm not very familiar with the Arduino IDE...do I need all of the backward slashes (\) within the quotation marks (") ??? Thanks. //inicialização da comunicação serial Serial.begin(9600); esp8266.begin(9600); sendData("AT+RST\r\n", 2000, DEBUG); //resetar módulo sendData("AT+CWMODE=1\r\n", 1000, DEBUG); //setar modo station sendData("AT+CWJAP=\"XXXX-XXXXX\",\"YYYYYYYYYY\"\r\n", 2000, DEBUG); //conectar com a rede wifi while (!esp8266.find("OK")) { //aguardar estabelecer conexão }

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Hello again. I successfully changed the baud rate in the ESP8266 using the directions previously posted. I can't easily access the USB port on the Arduino to upload the modified sketch with baud rate changed to 9600 for "esp8266.begin". I have a rookie question...when I upload the main "RoboAlegria" sketch on the first tab, all of the "sub sketches" (eyes, motors, communications, etc) will be uploaded as well...right? Do I need to do anything special? Also, do you see any potential problems with my LED face wiring? I'll check my other connections when I reupload the sketch. One other question, for the wheel motor wiring, I have the red and black wires reversed for the two motors. Is that correct? I didn't see a clear picture on the motor wiring (Neg vs Pos)...

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    Hello again. I successfully changed the baud rate in the ESP8266 using the directions previously posted. I can't easily access the USB port on the Arduino to upload the modified sketch with baud rate changed to 9600 for "esp8266.begin". I have a rookie question...when I upload the main "RoboAlegria" sketch on the first tab, all of the "sub sketches" (eyes, motors, communications, etc) will be uploaded as well...right? Do I need to do anything special? Also, do you see any potential problems with my LED face wiring? I'll check my other connections when I reupload the sketch. One other question, for the wheel motor wiring, I have the red and black wires reversed for the two motors. Is that correct? I didn't see a clear picture on the motor wiring (Neg vs Pos). Thanks!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    I learned the hard way, but the custom battery case turned out quite nice!

    Thanks for getting back to me! 1,2,&3. My robot's face is completed lighted up when I power it on...all LEDs are "on"...no "sleeping face". It seems there must be an issue. :( The arduino, servo controller and other components appear to have power. Further investigation required.I have experienced a lot of challenges with the ESP8266. Specifically, I learned the following: "AT+CIOBAUD=9600" can apparently "brick" the module...at least until it's reset. Also, I read NOT to use the command "AT+IPR=9600" since that can also brick the module. Currently, the correct command to set the baud rate for the current session is "AT+UART_CUR=9600,8,1,0,0" while "AT+UART_DEF=9600,8,1,0,0" will change it "permanently"....

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    Thanks for getting back to me! 1,2,&3. My robot's face is completed lighted up when I power it on...all LEDs are "on"...no "sleeping face". It seems there must be an issue. :( The arduino, servo controller and other components appear to have power. Further investigation required.I have experienced a lot of challenges with the ESP8266. Specifically, I learned the following: "AT+CIOBAUD=9600" can apparently "brick" the module...at least until it's reset. Also, I read NOT to use the command "AT+IPR=9600" since that can also brick the module. Currently, the correct command to set the baud rate for the current session is "AT+UART_CUR=9600,8,1,0,0" while "AT+UART_DEF=9600,8,1,0,0" will change it "permanently". I'm thinking that the best idea for the robot is to set all baud rates to 9600 (esp8266.begin in the sketch and changing it for the ESP8266 via command). The only real hassle should be unscrewing the base of the robot to access the USB port of the arduino to upload the modified sketch. What do you think?

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Please help. I think I am close to getting my robot to work. It powers up with all LEDs of the face lighted up. I tried using the html interface with Firefox, but the robot doesn't respond. There are obviously many problems that could be occurring. I would like to focus on the ESP8266 baud rate. The module is getting power but may not be communicating. Looking at the code: //inicialização da comunicação serial Serial.begin(9600); esp8266.begin(19200);In the _80_setup code, do I try changing the 19200 default to something else? Maybe 1115200? That's supposedly the default for many of these esp8266 modules. Do I need to modify "Serial.begin(9600)? I don't think so...just want to check. Thank you!!!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    I thought the battery wiring section would be fairly easy, but I was wrong! I learned the hard way that some 18650 batteries come with a built-in protection circuit that makes them several mm longer. I had purchased some decent quality Nitecore batteries with the protection circuit, which didn't fit my battery holder. Luckily, I was able to modify a design on Thingiverse (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:439657) and make a custom case with some parts on hand. It turned out pretty good.

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Trying to get back on track after receiving some poorly made Hex screws...replacements coming. Anyway, for mounting the two batteries, I see that you have them inserted in the same direction, which matches the diagram in the battery holder. Aren't two batteries normally installed in opposite directions? Can I insert them in opposite directions, relabel the inside of the battery case, and then solder a wire on just one end (- to +) instead of running a wire diagonally across the bottom of the case to make the - to + connection? Just a thought. Thanks!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Thought you might find this sort of cool. I had some transparent PETG filament and used it to 3D print a face shield for the robot. .5mm thick. Hope it diffuses the face LEDs but not too much! That was about maximum thickness without cracking it.

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  • BigGene commented on jsc's instructable Ultrasonic Parking Aid6 months ago
    Ultrasonic Parking Aid

    When you say "The board does not have component labels on the silkscreen, so you must refer to the Eagle brd file for placement," where is the legend for which components are placed in what positions on the board? For example C1 = x capacitor, R1 = y resistor, etc. If it's on the brd file, how do I open & read it? Thanks!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Great idea to use a Raspberry Pi...maybe even Raspberry Pi Zero W would work to help keep the size smaller. I used one of those along with a Leonardo Pro Micro ATmega32U4 5V/16MHz when I completed the GamePi instructable a few months ago (please see photo). However, I don't have enough knowledge to say whether these components would be powerful enough for the robot. I have also dreamed about making a robot that also serves as a "sensor station" which is able to detect human presence (maybe using a PIR sensor) along with a smoke/carbon monoxide sensor to warn of danger. I actually used someone else's basic design for a PIR activated night light...see other photos. That capability should be fairly easy to tie into the RPi or another microcontroller with a display. I have more id...

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    Great idea to use a Raspberry Pi...maybe even Raspberry Pi Zero W would work to help keep the size smaller. I used one of those along with a Leonardo Pro Micro ATmega32U4 5V/16MHz when I completed the GamePi instructable a few months ago (please see photo). However, I don't have enough knowledge to say whether these components would be powerful enough for the robot. I have also dreamed about making a robot that also serves as a "sensor station" which is able to detect human presence (maybe using a PIR sensor) along with a smoke/carbon monoxide sensor to warn of danger. I actually used someone else's basic design for a PIR activated night light...see other photos. That capability should be fairly easy to tie into the RPi or another microcontroller with a display. I have more ideas than knowledge!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    Thanks! It's certainly a busy time, so I appreciate your assistance to help me finish this project. On a separate note, I also noticed that one side of the robot's head rubs the shoulder just a little bit. I'm not sure of the exact cause...maybe from my gluing technique, maybe I tightened the screws a bit too much, or possibly the part dimensions are slightly off. Anyway, I think if you make the "neck" on the inside about two mm longer, the rubbing problem would be eliminated. This would give the head just a little more clearance from the shoulders. Thanks again.

    Awesome! Thank you. This will certainly help out others.

    Certainly! I wouldn't exactly call them parts, since I made them very crudely without a lot of thought regarding aesthetics :) Phone: I attached some velcro strips to the back of the phone case and to the 3d printed phone holder to ensure it stays in place. The 3d printed round nub (looks like a flyer saucer) is glued to the motor to allow another pivot point for the head (please see the other picture I previously uploaded). One picture shows the holes misaligned for the H-bridge and Arduino Uno, but you've already fixed that...great! Since I didn't want to reprint the entire base the other picture shows the H-bridge with a small black cylinder glued underneath to provide some additional stability. The picture from the inside of the robot shows some basic black frames that I used to ali...

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    Certainly! I wouldn't exactly call them parts, since I made them very crudely without a lot of thought regarding aesthetics :) Phone: I attached some velcro strips to the back of the phone case and to the 3d printed phone holder to ensure it stays in place. The 3d printed round nub (looks like a flyer saucer) is glued to the motor to allow another pivot point for the head (please see the other picture I previously uploaded). One picture shows the holes misaligned for the H-bridge and Arduino Uno, but you've already fixed that...great! Since I didn't want to reprint the entire base the other picture shows the H-bridge with a small black cylinder glued underneath to provide some additional stability. The picture from the inside of the robot shows some basic black frames that I used to align my Samsung phone, which must be a bit shorter than the phone you used. The framing is only .8 mm thick and simply fills in some gaps at the base of the phone and a little at the top. The final picture is of the robot in progress...you can see the black frame from the outside without the phone mounted yet. I'm waiting on some longer M2 screws, likely 16mm to mount the phone. Oh, I forgot to mention that I purchased a right angle USB cable in hopes of not having the same plug issue that you encountered. However, this really didn't solve the problem. The micro usb plug still doesn't fit well (stick out too far), so I used a small engraving tool to make some more room for the plug. Hope this helps some with your project!

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    I'm slowly making progress on this instructable. For mounting the L298N h-bridge on the base, only one mount hole aligns properly for screwing it down. Therefore, I 3D printed a small cylinder "pillar" to glue under the opposite side for stabilization. Also, for my Arduino R3 board, three out of four holes lined up properly, so that screwed down much better. To avoid splitting or breaking the mount points on the base, I recommend using a mini thread tapping tool to help reduce pressure on the plastic when screwing in the bolts. Just wanted to provide a few more observations and recommendations. Thanks.

    I haven't received a response to this question, so I'll provide a follow-up. I used a combination of a mini engraving tool and a tiny round file to enlarge/widen the holes in the fenders. This allowed me to insert some M3x35mm bolts that I happened to have on hand--purchased from either Home Depot or Lowe's here in the U.S. Also I mounted the motors and large wheels with the yellow "nub" facing inward and glued a small cylinder to the opposite side of the motor case to steady them in place when using the bolts. Hopefully I have the motors mounted properly with positive wire on the left. I'll post pics later if others are interested.

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    I'm reviewing & checking the wheel section before I actually start working. The holes in the wheel fender for the four M3x40mm bolts are a bit too close together compared to the motors holes. Did you just enlarge the fender holes a bit for the bolts to slide through? Also, for the soldered positive and negative terminal connections, did you flip the motor around so the terminals face the opposite direction? Does that make a difference? It looks like the side of the motor with the yellow cylinder nub is mounted against the fender. Thanks for your help!

    Thanks for the follow-up! I may try using a tablet screen protector cut-out to protect the face of the robot. I've only completed a portion of the build, but I have a few comments thus far. I used E6000 glue instead of super glue since it dries relatively quickly, doesn't run, and forms a slightly flexible and strong bond. Also, I 3d printed a very small "motor pivot" that I attached to the left side of servo #5 (the one on top) to hold it in place and allow the head to pivot evenly...I hope :) (See photo with yellow arrow...stl file attached also.) I used a micro engraving tool to make a small hole/divot on the inside of neck axis #1 frame to hold it in place. Also, I purchase 8x8 LED kits to make/solder all four panels separate after I destroyed one trying to desolder it. Th...

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    Thanks for the follow-up! I may try using a tablet screen protector cut-out to protect the face of the robot. I've only completed a portion of the build, but I have a few comments thus far. I used E6000 glue instead of super glue since it dries relatively quickly, doesn't run, and forms a slightly flexible and strong bond. Also, I 3d printed a very small "motor pivot" that I attached to the left side of servo #5 (the one on top) to hold it in place and allow the head to pivot evenly...I hope :) (See photo with yellow arrow...stl file attached also.) I used a micro engraving tool to make a small hole/divot on the inside of neck axis #1 frame to hold it in place. Also, I purchase 8x8 LED kits to make/solder all four panels separate after I destroyed one trying to desolder it. Those kits were cheap, fairly quick to complete, gave me some soldering practice, and didn't take too l long. Next, I realized that connecting all components was quite tricky/intricate in terms of the order, so I found myself unscrewing and reattaching the shoulders, neck, etc. several times to figure out the "puzzle" procedure ;). The shoulder cups were the most challenging. Since I haven't hooked up the electronics yet, I have some concerns about having the four LED components attached in the right order. I looked at your pictures to try to figure it out. Please see my pictures and advise. One final question (for now)...which servo motor goes to which shoulder (right or left) for servo#'s 2 & 4? It may be in one of the graphics/pictures, but I don't want to connect them backwards. I'm attaching some pictures from last night's efforts. Thank you so much! Might daughter wanted to make a robot, but I'm doing most of the work :)

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  • Joy Robot (Robô Da Alegria) - Open Source 3D Printed, Arduino Powered Robot!

    For the LED face, did you install some type of clear cover over it? It looks like there's some sort of clear protective plastic or something. It's a probably a good idea to keep dust out. Please tell me what material you used and how you installed it. Thanks!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    That's a better idea than trying to track down a battery that fits and having to buy a separate circuitboard to interface. I thought this 3.7V 10,000 mAh battery might work and provide longer battery life...need to check the dimensions. https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-7V-10000mAh-LiPo-Polymer-li-ion-Battery-Cell-For-Power-Bank-Case-Mobile-rt-06/202220077650?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Greetings. I had some concerns about the availability of this battery when I started, but luckily grabbed one of the Promic before it was apparently discontinued. You may be able to use something like this with a separately board adapter for the connections: https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-7V-10000mAh-LiPo-Polymer-li-ion-Battery-Cell-For-Power-Bank-Case-Mobile-rt-06/202220077650?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20131003132420%26meid%3Ddeffb990a83a43009862e9e124c1c949%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D12%26mehot%3Dlo%26sd%3D173306713027%26itm%3D202220077650&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851. Also, I have not compared the dimensions or the voltage, so please verify. Araymbox is definitely more knowledgeable and the original designer, so he may have a better idea to help y...

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    Greetings. I had some concerns about the availability of this battery when I started, but luckily grabbed one of the Promic before it was apparently discontinued. You may be able to use something like this with a separately board adapter for the connections: https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-7V-10000mAh-LiPo-Polymer-li-ion-Battery-Cell-For-Power-Bank-Case-Mobile-rt-06/202220077650?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20131003132420%26meid%3Ddeffb990a83a43009862e9e124c1c949%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D12%26mehot%3Dlo%26sd%3D173306713027%26itm%3D202220077650&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851. Also, I have not compared the dimensions or the voltage, so please verify. Araymbox is definitely more knowledgeable and the original designer, so he may have a better idea to help you out. Good luck.

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  • BigGene made the instructable GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station9 months ago
    GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    After several months of work, I finally completed this project...my first Instructable! While waiting for a couple of parts to arrive, I designed and made a hinged case to protect my pride and joy. I printed the case on my 3D printer and padded the inside with foam and sticky felt. I can post the stl files if others are interested. My design skills are still a work in progress, but the case works for me. Many thanks to araymbox for the hard work and assistance along the way.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Thanks!

    My follow-up dumb question: Can I simply edit my retroarch.cfg file to use the same settings you have defined above? If so, how would I do it? Loud sounds are fine at home, but I may make some enemies on an airplane :)

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    I finally got my GamePi up and running a few weeks ago...simply awesome. I learned how to exit the game (press select & start at the same time), but how do you save a game? Thanks.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Success...finally! I swapped out the analog joystick for another one. At first the button didn't work to the right, but resoldered the connections and all axes seem to be recognized. Thanks to araymbox and everyone else!!!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    I certainly can't guarantee compatibility, but this Belkin 5000 battery charger might work: https://www.amazon.com/Belkin-Durable-Portable-Cha...Good luck. You can see that I've had my fair share of challenges...just need to get my analog joystick working or replaced.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Yes...however, I did notice that the controller cursor was quite "jumpy" and didn't appear to respond very well when I moved the joystick. I suspected something might be wrong although I double-checked my wiring to ensure it mirrored the instructions. After further research, it's possible that my analog controller may be wired a bit differently than yours. The VCC and GND might need to be reversed accordingly to this schematic: https://mechail.wordpress.com/2009/04/23/psp-joystick-project-part-one/ and another one that I found. I'm going to switch those connections and let you know the result.

    Switching the wires doesn't seem to have fixed the problem. When settings up the controls, is there a special way to set the up, down, left, right positions for the analog joystick. Do I just hold it in one of those positions until it registers? If I move it in one of those direction for just a second, nothing happens...remains "undefined". Maybe I have a faulty joystick?

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Well, I may be down to one final question on this project. My analog joystick is not recognized when trying to configure it. The D-pad and all other push buttons can be reconfigured fine. Is there likely something wrong with my wiring connections or do I need to settings somewhere? Any recommendations for a game to test it out? Thanks in advance for helping.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    I'm on a roll! If sound isn't working when you firs start up the system, follow these directions to prioritize the USB sound card over the built-in sound card: https://sudomod.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=144

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    If your wifi router configuration is WPS, the credentials from /boot/wifikeyfile.txt cannot be imported like WPA. You may need to attach a wireless keyboard via the female USB port to type your wifi password. That worked for me.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Answering my own question... Since my wifi router configuration is WPS, I decided to attach a wireless keyboard to try to change my wifi settings. It worked! Retropie recognized my CanaKit keyboard, and I was able to set my password.

    Still working through a few issues. I successfully uploaded a ROM and it runs. However, I don't have any sound. Are there any more detailed instructions on sound settings? I've tried "Auto" on the main screen, but I don't hear anything. The system does appear to recognize my sound card. Also, how do I exit a game and get back to the main menu? Noob question, but I've just been rebooting my system each time. Surely there's a better way. Thanks.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    I got the original USB hub to work by switching two wires!!! In Step 16, when the hub is rotated 180 degrees to match the actual layout, the green wire should be next to the red wire instead of the white/gray wire. After switching the green and white wires, the gamepad was detected. I noticed that issue by looking at how the hub wires were originally arranged.

    I've run into an issue related to wifi connectivity. My Verizon FiOS router uses WPS instead of WPA. Apparently, "Import wifi credentials from /boot/wifikeyfile.txt" only works on WPA. I double-checked my file wifi details in the file, but it won't load. I also tried another way... adding a WPA_Supplicant configuration file. That doesn't appear to have worked either. Any recommendations on how to connect with WPS? Thanks!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Thanks! Waiting for a (hopefully) different type to arrive. The last one had soldering points on both the back and front of the PCB (same number of solder points). I'm keeping my fingers crossed that swapping the hub will solve the problem. Otherwise, I'll ship it to you for troubleshooting. :)

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    I didn't see the answer below before my posting my question about the gamepad not being detected. I will be busy for the next couple of weeks, but I will try to test the USB hub to see if it's providing power to my Arduino. My gamepad control testing seemed to work fine when plugged into the pc but something is not working now. I agree with all of you...USB hub may be having issues. My hub is a bit different than the one used here...one set of connection points is on the bottom of the hub PCB.

    Answering my own question. Soldered to AV1 on the display controller and that seems to work fine. Display turns on and displays "AV1" briefly in the upper right corner.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    I finally completed all steps and powered up. However, after getting through the boot up messages, I get to the Welcome screen that says "No Gamepads Detected" and "Hold a button on your device to configure it. Press F4 to quit at any time." When I press and hold a button, there's no response from the system. I tested the controls as recommended in step 12. Any ideas? Please help!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    On my display controller, it looks like AV1 and AV2 are switched/backwards from your display controller. Just want to verify that the connection has to be to AV1 from the Pi Zero. It's taken my a long time to get this far after having to reorder the main switch. Thanks!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Are there supposed to be pictures included with the initial bootup instructions? Thanks.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Connect the female micro USB jack for the Arduino (scevenged from the USB hub in "Step 5: Prepare the USB Hub") as seen in the first picture.I think this should be to connect the scavenged MALE micro USB jack, which plugs into the female micro USB jack on the Pro Micro Arduino. Can you confirm? Thanks.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    For this step...Secure the shoulder buttons with a M3x14 hex screw.Should the shoulder buttons "float" (slightly loose) so they can be pushed or should the screw be tightly screwed into the buttons? It seem like it should be a bit loose through the actual button so it can be pressed & bounce back. However, I think the screw should be tightly secured to the frame/housing. Please confirm. It looks like I might need to sand the holes of my buttons to allow the screw to freely move. Thanks.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Could you please add a few close-up pictures of the soldered sides of the PCBs? I can almost see your connection points from the photos, but they're not quite detailed enough for me to check. Sorry for the trouble. I've been trying to work on this project for several weeks...had to wait on parts. Thanks!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Novice question: For mounting the tactile switches on the PCB, are the legs marked for ground and signal connections? (I don't see markings like I would on an IC.) Or, do I just need to have them oriented in the correct direction? Thanks.

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    To close the case, I see that you use 4 M3x14 hex screws. It looks like you also "slid in" 3mm nuts as well to secure it...right? Also, do you think it would be helpful to use 3mm washers along with the screws to spreadload pressure, especially across the PCB corners. It looks like there should be room. Thanks!

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  • GamePi Zero - the Favorable Emulation Station

    Thanks! That's perfect. I went ahead and 3d printed all housing and button components...hope the rest works out for me!

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