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  • CharlesD82 commented on RobBest's instructable Cat Repellent
    Cat Repellent

    Can you make one to repulse squirrels? My feral cats outside are so old and fat that they don't hunt them anymore, and the squirrels raise havoc with my pear tree (which I love more than squirrels!). I don't know if there's a frequency difference that rodents react to, or if over time they would just become desensitized to the sound.

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  • How to Restore an Old Junkyard Motorcycle

    Great 'ible! It brought back a lot of memories when I restored a twin Honda CB (650?) 25 years ago that I bought for $50. Cleaning/rebuilding the carbs is a must and frankly, just saves you hours of grief up front. I also ended up replacing the chain and wheel bearings in mine, but the CB series were built like tanks.

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  • Kveik - Brewers Yeast Ring

    It's soaked in the yeast material (fermentation pot, etc.), and the yeast will bond in the wood and latch on two the crevices. It's then taken out before you finish the brew and dried at room temperature, and the yeast that has bonded to the wood will also dry and go into suspended animation, instead of dying off. I suppose you could also store the ring in the freezer once it dries, and it will protect the culture even further, but in the days before refrigeration, it was a very valuable tool to a baker or a brewer.

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  • Resurfacing Cast Iron Pans

    It wasn't that he pans were good or bad per se, it was just that they were made differently. In the old days, they used plaster/ceramic molds to cast the iron pans, which gave them a smoother surface, and also allowed them to be cast thinner, which made them lighter. I'm sure there was a little more human interaction with the finishing of the metal too.Now that companies use oiled sand (sand casting) to build their molds, they generally have to be made thicker, and that's what results in the "pebbled" finish. My opinion, based on the new and old pans that I own that span 100+ years is that the shiny finish that they're selling people is nothing more than a marketing ploy to get you to buy a more expensive pan. I have never had anything stick from a properly seasoned pan that…

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    It wasn't that he pans were good or bad per se, it was just that they were made differently. In the old days, they used plaster/ceramic molds to cast the iron pans, which gave them a smoother surface, and also allowed them to be cast thinner, which made them lighter. I'm sure there was a little more human interaction with the finishing of the metal too.Now that companies use oiled sand (sand casting) to build their molds, they generally have to be made thicker, and that's what results in the "pebbled" finish. My opinion, based on the new and old pans that I own that span 100+ years is that the shiny finish that they're selling people is nothing more than a marketing ploy to get you to buy a more expensive pan. I have never had anything stick from a properly seasoned pan that was properly heated before the food was put in. Just saying.

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  • Handcrafted Reed Fishing Floats (Bobbers)

    Nice job on the bobbers! What are the plastic pieces you're using to cinch the fishing line to them?

    Very cool - Thanks!

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  • Absolutely! You can also omit some ingredients if your dog is fussy...Though I can't imagine any dog passing up any of those ingredients. FWIW, my father (a veterinarian) would make variations of this recipe to feed dogs with sensitive tummies or needed to lose weight. What you'll find sometimes is that because the food is so nutritionally dense, the dog ends up needing to eat less food.

    What's cool about this recipe is that if you spread it out on a greased cookie sheet and stick it in the freezer, you can make some phenomenal frozen dog treats!

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  • Yes, leave the cream out until you're done cooking the chicken. Otherwise, it will curdle and burn, if you mix it in before cooking.It's literally the last thing you add before serving.

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  • You shouldn't need too. Since the pumice stone is solid (it is a stone), there's no adhesive for the abrasive to break down from.

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  • I used to do it with by backstopping the holes and filling them in (and cursing!), until someone showed me how to do it this way. Quick, simple and painless!

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  • While untempered spikes are somewhat soft, I don't think for light work you're going to see any appreciable damage to them. The author should get years of service out of them.

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  • Made it yesterday, and it came out WONDERFUL!I substituted 2 Tbsp of applesauce instead of oil, and it was perfect!

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  • I think you’re referring to the batten strips. They’re mostly decorative in this case, but we’re used in the old days to hold covering, like tarpaper, in place.The “Budget” part of the build is doing it yourself. Back in 2007, when I built a 12x16 two story shed, it cost me about $1200 US (3 windows, 2 doors and vinyl siding). The same one would have cost me $6-8K installed.

    You probably can, but if it were me, I would:A) Pour 10-12” of concrete in each post hole for added stability and to limit settling.B) Use pressurized lumber for the posts and floor risers (I can’t see if the author had).C) Add 3 or 4 (depending if you’re doing a porch) center posts with a center board under the floor risers, to provide stability.The added supplies would add less than $100US to the supply list.

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  • CharlesD82 commented on knipgold's instructable Pure Gold Wedding Ring

    Use a graphite block instead of charcoal. They're available online and pretty inexpensive, and they don't burn up like charcoal would.

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  • Funny! My brothers and I used oatmeal and salt containers.

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  • Yes, if you leave them in long enough (overnight, or a day or so), it will totally remove all of the rust and unfreeze them. I have had parts that were completely jammed to the point that I couldn't close or open them with extreme force. After letting them soak for a few days, they were like new.The best part of this process is that it will only remove the rust, not the good metal. If you're worried about soaking something that's heat treated (because you could develop hydrogen ions in the metal), just place it in an oven @ 400 degrees for an hour after treating.

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  • CharlesD82 commented on a-morpheus's instructable Undead Pan

    The problem with using fire to "clean" the cast iron is that cast iron is very brittle, and if there are any flaws in the metal to begin with or if it is heated irregularly or too fast, you can potentially crack the metal, especially a piece as thin as that pot.IMHO, for something as lightly mucked as that pot was, I would have just used a damp washcloth with some coarse salt to scour the pan, give it a washing, and then treat it.

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  • CharlesD82 commented on geotek's instructable Making Box Joints

    Thank you so much! You just showed me the missing link on why my box cuts were never square (I was missing the spacing block and the guide). You have my vote!

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  • It's also very useful in removing water rings from furniture. Take a dab and rub it in a ciruclar pattern.

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  • Flux for sweating pipes is corrosive (acid based) and will cause the treated area to corrode and turn green over time. I have been told that it would eventually cause pinhole leaks in the pipe, but so will the wrong Ph in water.

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  • That's one heck of a garage sale find! If no one has told you, that's a 1937 S&W 1917 contract model in .45 ACP/AR that was made for the Brazilian Navy. A boatload of them came back in the 1990's (in about that condition).Great Instructable!

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