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  • ChrisO138 commented on ChrisO138's instructable Custom PCBs on a CNC Router10 months ago
    Custom PCBs on a CNC Router

    Thanks for the tip. I've considered the ground plane idea, and am thinking about trying it out on a future project. For the boards I've been making, clearing the copper takes about 15 minutes at the speed I give in this Instructable, and 7 minutes at the speed I normally operate. I don't need to produce enough volume for that to be a problem. But I have dealt with short circuits in the past, and they freak me out, so I choose to trade the extra time for reduced risk. Many of my decisions originate from experience-based fear. :-)

    Based on your tip, I added this to that part of the write-up:There are (at least) a couple of legitimate reasons to leave the non-copper region in place, but if you are just getting started, I suggest clearing it now and learning those reasons after you have a little more experience.This Instructable is already way too long, and I didn't want to add another paragraph to further develop that topic since it will be learned naturally through the process. I believe that clearing the non-copper region is the best instruction to give to someone who's never done this before.Thanks!

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  • ChrisO138 commented on ChrisO138's instructable Custom PCBs on a CNC Router10 months ago
  • ChrisO138 followed 3D-Printing, cnc, electronics, computers and 3 others channel 10 months ago
  • ChrisO138 commented on glowtime's instructable Soldering RGBW and RGB LED Strip Tape11 months ago
    Soldering RGBW and RGB LED Strip Tape

    He did, and I can tell you why. That roll of five-lead wire comes in the order: Black, green, red, blue and white, but his light strip has the blue and white swapped. The light strips I purchased have the leads in the same order as the wires. I’m not sure which version of the light strip has B and W swapped at the end, but that’s what is pictured.

    BTW, it wasn't "the wire" that you used that had the colors swapped - it's the lights. Most sets of those lights have W and B in the other order. This is the first time I've seen them otherwise.

    https://amzn.to/2CMLxEiIt's similar in a lot of ways to rubber cement, but better consistency for application to electrical components. You can get it at most hardware stores.It's great for this particular application.

    Great info! I just soldered a bunch of these and am doing an instructable on a different topic, but felt compelled to write about 10 extra pages with all these tips. I’ll link to this for that part instead. The surprising thing I discovered is: Don’t waste Your money on solderless connectors. They aren’t reliable, so you mostly end up with a false sense of hope when you buy them. I was glad to see someone else have the same experience. Nobody else seems to mention that they really don’t work. One suggestion that I have: I would encourage people to us a multimeter after soldering to make sure there isn’t accidental connectivity between the newly soldered adjacent pads. It’s worth spending a few seconds at that point to verify your work before covering and securing it. One way that I dif...

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    Great info! I just soldered a bunch of these and am doing an instructable on a different topic, but felt compelled to write about 10 extra pages with all these tips. I’ll link to this for that part instead. The surprising thing I discovered is: Don’t waste Your money on solderless connectors. They aren’t reliable, so you mostly end up with a false sense of hope when you buy them. I was glad to see someone else have the same experience. Nobody else seems to mention that they really don’t work. One suggestion that I have: I would encourage people to us a multimeter after soldering to make sure there isn’t accidental connectivity between the newly soldered adjacent pads. It’s worth spending a few seconds at that point to verify your work before covering and securing it. One way that I differed from what you did: Instead of heat shrink tubing, I sealed my solders with liquid electrical tape, which is 100% effective, and very easy. It’s also the most effective way i’ve found of securing solder points since it is essentially gluing them into place and putting a solid isolation barrier between them. Liquid tape also seals the part you have to cut open to access the solder pads in waterproof LED strips, so you won’t lose the waterproofing properties of those strips. This is great stuff! Thanks for sharing!

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  • ChrisO138 commented on tdonoclift's instructable Hanging Gear Clock1 year ago
    Hanging Gear Clock

    Yeah, I was thinking about the reed switch after I posted, and remembered that it's difficult to control the precise trigger point with those. Ranges typically vary by about an inch, depending on various properties of the magnet and the approach angle, which wouldn't work well for "homing" a clock. I'm going to play around with an optical sensor and a hall-effect sensor. Given the small gap between the base of the clock and the moving parts, I believe that an optical sensor will be the easiest and will provide the highest level of precision.But then again... Back on the reed switch idea. With some simple tricks in software, the trigger and release positions could be calculated each time the trigger (magnet) passes the switch, and the mid-point should be acceptably close to the...

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    Yeah, I was thinking about the reed switch after I posted, and remembered that it's difficult to control the precise trigger point with those. Ranges typically vary by about an inch, depending on various properties of the magnet and the approach angle, which wouldn't work well for "homing" a clock. I'm going to play around with an optical sensor and a hall-effect sensor. Given the small gap between the base of the clock and the moving parts, I believe that an optical sensor will be the easiest and will provide the highest level of precision.But then again... Back on the reed switch idea. With some simple tricks in software, the trigger and release positions could be calculated each time the trigger (magnet) passes the switch, and the mid-point should be acceptably close to the middle of the switch. So, the calibration points could be known on each revolution, and a calibration could conceivably take place after each instance in which the trigger has left the area of affect and the reed switch re-opens.The main advantage of magnetic triggering is that the parts that perform the nerdery can remain hidden. It would be a shame to dork up this design by punching holes through it for sensors. You've done an unusually great job of hiding all of that in your design, so I'd be willing to bet that you're sensitive to that.Now if only I could be back at my shop.

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