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1Instructables15,706Views29CommentsAsheville, North CarolinaJoined January 4th, 2017
Graduated Systems Engineer from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Currently working as a manufacturing engineer. I have mostly used this site for Arduino projects and coding.

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners2 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    Not sure. I don't really know what's going on with that board. Do you want to Skype sometime and let me take a look at it that way?

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners2 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    eeek! be careful. If all your tubes are running it can mean a few things. One of them being a current moving in the wrong direction which can fry your tubes or the 74141 IC chips. Once the 74141 chip dies it can cause it to turn on everything at once! Let me know if you need a hand. Make sure to include some pictures.

    runs in reverse? Like backwards in time? Also for the 2 second delay the code is matching the time on your computer to the clock. Check your system time on the uploading computer. I wouldn't worry much about 2 seconds though.

    Yes please do send me some pics. A video of everything up close would be great as well! I have no idea what the problem is but if you are seeing the digits clearly and they are running then its most likely some data wires plugged in wrong or a code issue. Shouldn't be too hard too diagnose.

    did it come together foright ya?

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners3 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    I want to say yes but I would be careful with it. The only way I could know for sure is to buy that module and then plug it into my clock to check for time accuracy. If I were you I would just get adafruits, it's cheap and very effective. They also have a lot of online source code and examples to help you along the way.

    Hi, thanks for checking out the blog,You could do either method. In my example what I am doing is setting the pins A2 and A3 to high or low respective to power and ground. So for the power pin on the ds1307 I am setting the A2 pin to high, which produces enough power to power the ds1307 chip. For the A3 pin I am setting it too low to act as a ground. You could also attach them to a power supply and ground if you wanted too.The only reason I am using the pins, is too save space inside the clock case, less wires.Thanks

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners3 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    In the final clock .ino code you will see a portion of the code focusing on hours. It is underneath the comment "/////////////////////////Hours//////////////////"You will need to alter this code to get 24 hour time. My clock is in 24 hour time however I do not have it on me at this moment. Once I get back home I'll send you the exact code to make the clock 24 hour time. Its not very hard, you just have to change the for and if statement around if I remember correctly.Thanks,

    Im not sure what edits were made. Ive never seen that issue with any of my clocks. Were any changes made to the antipoison portion of the code?

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners4 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    The RTC looks correct. As long as you have a clean 5v supply it should'nt be a problem. Especially if the serial monitor is displaying the correct time. I am having a hard time understanding your second paragraph. Have you tried writing some code just to make all the tubes count from 0 to 9 on their own, regardless of the time? That way you can check to see if its the translation of time from your RTC, or a problem with your shift registers and 74141 chips.I would try and run a few test on a small portion of the clock. Like make each tube count to 9 from 0 one at a time and make sure everything looks good and then see if its ok from there.Thanks,

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners4 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    If a tube is not glowing at all it is most likely a problem with the power supply or the tube is bad. Even if the 74141 chip isn't working properly the tube should still light up, though it may not show a digit. I will check my source code on this instructable to make sure it works with my clock. Did you test all the tubes before attaching them to the board?

    A power supply that is too small could very well be an issue. Let me know what you find out.

    I am sorry I missed this email and have not seen this question yet. Its been 6 weeks, have you managed to address the issue? Sorry for the long wait for a reply.

    Also check the update I made on my step about the RTC chip. it may help you.

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners5 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    You very much could. I quickly reviewed the ds1302 and it appears to be a more functional date time chip. Along with tracking time it tracks date as well. The only problem is you will have to modify my code that uses the DS1307 and rewrite it to use the ds1302, this will be a good bit of code. The model I looked at also looked like you could plug it in on top of the arduino like in my clock design.

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners6 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    You are correct, if you are making a prototype with a breadboard you will not need the capacitors. For setting the time, I manually do it within the arduino program. You could add buttons if you wanted too but I ended up using all the uno digital pins with my design. The battery will keep time if you turn the clock off and remove it from the wall outlet. I wired mine so that the on/off switch turned the tubes on and off while keeping the arduino uno running to maximize battery life. As far as only using four tubes you shouldn't have to change any code however you will only be wiring in two shift registers worth of wires to the uno. I don't think this will give you an error but if it does let me know.The anti-poisoning cycle runs every 10 minutes and simply counts through all the digits ...

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    You are correct, if you are making a prototype with a breadboard you will not need the capacitors. For setting the time, I manually do it within the arduino program. You could add buttons if you wanted too but I ended up using all the uno digital pins with my design. The battery will keep time if you turn the clock off and remove it from the wall outlet. I wired mine so that the on/off switch turned the tubes on and off while keeping the arduino uno running to maximize battery life. As far as only using four tubes you shouldn't have to change any code however you will only be wiring in two shift registers worth of wires to the uno. I don't think this will give you an error but if it does let me know.The anti-poisoning cycle runs every 10 minutes and simply counts through all the digits 0-9 on each tube. You shouldn't need a code change but if you see an error then please let me know. You could really do anything you wanted with the anti-poisoning cycle. I'm fairly certain i sub-functioned it into my code so you could just change my sub function. As far as tube durability I think its best just to turn the clock on when you want it to be noticed, like while your at the office like mine, or have guests. The tubes have a natural life expectancy and will die eventually. You can also swap the tubes around like car tires, switch minutes and hours every once in a while, to extend the tube life.Thanks,

    Here is a youtube video explaining the capacitors and their function.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xgPsA6Mul4&feature=youtu.be

    Ok, so this is a bit of a wild idea. First off, you could probably build the project without the capacitors, if you were trying to get it into a very small area (like a watch). However you will need to make sure you have a very steady inflow of power.My capacitors are not actually in line with anything. When i designed my boards that hold the nixie tubes I did a GND and 5v pour on the board that covers a large area of the board around the IC chips. Look at the board picture in step 6 and its the area inside the dashed red and blue lines. The capacitors are placed just near the 5v inputs on the IC chips to better manage the 5v power around those surface areas of the chips. Essentially they are acting as a power regulator just over a small portion of the PCB. You definitely do not want to...

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    Ok, so this is a bit of a wild idea. First off, you could probably build the project without the capacitors, if you were trying to get it into a very small area (like a watch). However you will need to make sure you have a very steady inflow of power.My capacitors are not actually in line with anything. When i designed my boards that hold the nixie tubes I did a GND and 5v pour on the board that covers a large area of the board around the IC chips. Look at the board picture in step 6 and its the area inside the dashed red and blue lines. The capacitors are placed just near the 5v inputs on the IC chips to better manage the 5v power around those surface areas of the chips. Essentially they are acting as a power regulator just over a small portion of the PCB. You definitely do not want to in line the capacitors, as in, directly add the capacitor before the IC chip via a wire. In short, the problem with doing large 5v or + pour on a PCB is that power will fluctuate across the surface area of that poor. To reduce the chances of a fluctuation causing an error on my IC chip I placed small capacitors around the 5v input that better controlled any kind of positive power fluctuation going into the IC chip. They do not directly wire into the IC chip, but instead just cross the positive and GND pours.Would you like a short youtube video explination?

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners9 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    I have added full circuit images to step 9. This includes smaller portion images and one total large image. I also included the Eagle schematic, if you don't have the eagle software I highly recommend you download it. It is a free software. The software can be found here.https://www.autodesk.com/products/eagle/overviewThanks,

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners9 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    I will work on putting one together for you today. It may take me until tomorrow to finish it. It's really too big to hand draw so I will make it in Eagle and then post it both in the comments as well as the instructable. Thanks.

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  • Cledfo11 made the instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners9 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    Here is one of the three dual tube circuit schematics

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners9 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    Here is the original schematic for each of the three dual tube circuits. Are you looking for a schematic with the arduino board, step up chip, switch, and real time clock?

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  • Cledfo11 commented on Cledfo11's instructable Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners10 months ago
    Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    There is a specific order in which the pins must be connected.For the seconds shift register the following pin set up is required:For the SER pin (C data pin 14) connects to arduino pin 2For the RCLK pin (IC data pin 12) connects to arduino pin 4For the SRCLK pin (IC data pin 11) connects to arduino pin 3You can repeat this order for the other 2 shift registers.You can also check out the fritz schematic in step 4 of the tutorial for a visual. This shift register is shown with LEDs' but it is the same connection to the arduino board.You can also check out this awesome instructable tutorial by @Codebender_cc at the following URL:https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-use-a-Shift-Register-Arduino-Tutorial/Please let me know if you get hung up on anything else.Thanks!

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  • Arduino Nixie Clock for Absolute Beginners

    Step 6 now has the full PCB schematic, a picture of the board from a CAD files, the zip folder with the board, schematic, and misc. files that can be sent to many custom PCB manufactures, the stand alone schematic file, as well as the CAD file of the board. They can be opened upon downloading the EAGLE program. If you have any more questions let me know.

    Sorry for the 2 day wait.

    Yea, I will upload them in just a moment, I will also include my Eagle file.

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