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  • ClydeS commented on klilise's instructable Making Leather (shoes, Etc) Supple2 months ago
    Making Leather (shoes, Etc) Supple

    No. You're confusing leather with an edible item. It won't go rancid just as applying it to wood wouldn't cause it to go rancid. The rancid idea is a myth.

    Saddle soap is a better choice for leather

    Yes there is a limit and you can easily ruin your leather item by applying too much oil A couple thin coats is all that in necessary. Addiing oil is gong to darken the leather. If the oil is showing through all the way to the inside of the shoe, you are applying too much. Don't slosh the oil on. Apply thing coats

    Not only are you wrong you are giving out BAD INFO saying there is not limit to how much or how frequently a leather item is oiled. Please research this and modify your instructable accordingly. People are going to ruin leather items based on your comment above.

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  • ClydeS commented on JDTagish's instructable Introduction to Leatherworking9 months ago
    Introduction to Leatherworking

    Very thorough introduction to leatherwork. There is an error, however, labeling veg tan as "by far the most common leather". Actually it's just the opposite as veg tan makes up a mere 10% of tanned leathers. Chrome tan (smooth, soft, pliable) is what most people are familiar with -- car interiors, furniture, clothing, bags, and so on. Veg tan is the preferred leather for horse tack and saddles. It's also the leather of choice for a lot of crafts projects since it's the only leather you can carve, stamp, and mold. There's nothing wrong with either leathers and one can often be substituted for the other except for carving, stamping, and molding. It depends on what it is you're making. Generally speaking the more soft and pliable your project calls for (garments for exam...

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    Very thorough introduction to leatherwork. There is an error, however, labeling veg tan as "by far the most common leather". Actually it's just the opposite as veg tan makes up a mere 10% of tanned leathers. Chrome tan (smooth, soft, pliable) is what most people are familiar with -- car interiors, furniture, clothing, bags, and so on. Veg tan is the preferred leather for horse tack and saddles. It's also the leather of choice for a lot of crafts projects since it's the only leather you can carve, stamp, and mold. There's nothing wrong with either leathers and one can often be substituted for the other except for carving, stamping, and molding. It depends on what it is you're making. Generally speaking the more soft and pliable your project calls for (garments for example) chrome tan will give you the best results. The more firm and sturdy the piece calls for, (belts for example) veg tan will give you the best results.

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  • Third Hand++: A multi-use helping hand for electronics and other delicate work.

    Hi, Sure. Here's a few linksFlange plates http://www.ebay.com/itm/10Pcs-1-Black-Malleable-Threaded-Floor-Flange-Iron-Pipe-Fittings-Wall-Mounted-/381855931525?hash=item58e8631c85:g:7kYAAOSwXeJYMsf3Male adapterhttp://www.ebay.com/itm/1-2-C-x-1-2-Male-NPT-Threaded-Copper-Adapter-/251649760875?hash=item3a977e9e6b:g:8PsAAOSwnDZUGvXBI'm guessing you can figure out the other parts

    You have to add a piece of 1/2" copper pipe to the 1/2" male adapter. It just slides inside the adapter. You could glue it in but it would be better to solder it

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