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Dark Solar

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  • 3D Print Your Own Dungeons!

    I'm not going to say that's a good use of 3-D printing but I know if I had one, I'd be all over it. ;D

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  • It's not a stone but sea glass does exactly what you described. Diamonds have the same refractive index as water so maybe a tumbled diamond?

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  • See: below reply to oakland1000. :D

    poly=polyurethane

    Both have their ideal places; if it's just wood screws penetrating the polyurethane finish into ply or natural wood, use polyurethane to seal the broken grain rather than silicone as silicone tends to be slick and would compromise the screw's grip. If it's a self-locking sheet metal screw penetrating and seating against a skin material (aluminum, galvanized sheet, etc.) silicone works great. Hope this helps. :D

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  • The author touched on something that I'd like to re-iterate and also add to: once you get all your glue-ups done, polyurethane (exterior grade) everything made of wood both sides & all edges 2-3 coats. Also, any place you're going to put a screw-fastener through the finish, before you seat the screw, back it out and use a cheap pump-oiler to squirt a bit of poly into the hole. I know it sounds like overkill but water ALWAYS finds a way in; better it should hit a solid wall than a sweet patch of open grain.

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  • I actually prefer using the back of a ceramic tile because it's already divided up into squares/hexagons (having a fine-nib magic marker helps too) that are easy to label and keep ordered.

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  • Copper plating doesn't work as well with saltwater electrolyte but it wouldn't be anything at all to have a second bath of copper sulfate waiting (no wasted PCB :D); quick rinse, change of current polarity and dunk --easy-peasy. For the tarnish problem, maybe a quick wipe down with linseed/tung oil. Just a heads-up for readers: copper sulfate crystals (the blue stuff) are readily available at most hardware stores as root killer; just be aware that, if using graphite/stainless electrodes, when your sulfate solution ceases to be blue, you will have a small container of sulfuric acid of x molarity. To avoid this, use whatever copper scrap you happen to have laying about as the anode. As always, wear rubber gloves and appropriate eye protection when working with chemicals.

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  • Sweater-town isn't accepting visitors today.

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  • ^ That same thing he said. Additionally, old, broken leaf springs are pretty easy to come by, usually weigh at least 5lb/2.27kg and make awesome knives with plenty of room for learning curve. :D

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  • Dark Solar commented on Emsaid's instructable DIY Glow Sticks

    Ok...umm...let's see...Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) decomposes into sodium carbonate at temperatures above 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit) yielding carbon dioxide and water vapor. At 200 degrees Celsius (392 degrees Fahrenheit) this decomposition is rapid and somewhat violent as the evolved gases tend to cause sodium carbonate to bubble and become airborne.Sodium carbonate (washing soda) decomposes into sodium oxide, carbon dioxide and water vapor at 851 degrees Celsius (1563.8 degrees Fahrenheit; see incandescence chart for visual example of temperature). Sodium oxide is very slowly added to cold, distilled water to create sodium hydroxide solution. And that's pretty much the long and short of it. :D

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  • Nice use of roofing tar in place of spray undercoating --best cheat of the week!!

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  • That's a pretty sweet table. Next challenge: greater detail. :D

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  • Dark Solar commented on Vasugan's instructable Homemade bike

    I like the bending jig; what are you doing that keeps the square tubing from undergoing inward deformation at the interior radii?

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  • Nice!! While this info isn't much good for us temperate-zone dwellers, it's great for anyone whom is lucky enough to have banana and coconut palms (yes, I'm jealous). Two thumbs up. :DFor those of you whom are considering eating this type of nightshade: the safe kind produces berries in clusters while the deadly kind produces single berries. That said, it's probably a wise idea to look up both and get a direct look at them.

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  • Second the propane/LNG option!! Sure it's a little costly but it's also super-clean, has fairly low sulfur contamination risk and you get to have the fun of building a burner (Ron Reil's Mongo burner is a pretty good example) that can melt everything from pot metal to cast iron! :D

    If you can secure a coal (ideally anthracite) supply, coking it is easy enough --the process is similar to making charcoal via distillation method. Alternately, you can start a coal fire in a container and when the coal you can see on top of the fire turns white, dump the whole mess into a tub of water. Give it a rinse and once it dries out, you'll have a good grade of coke. Or, you could take the lazy path and just get a lid for your crucible. ; )About the author's mention of charcoal briquettes; they do win out over lump charcoal in terms of ease of acquisition but they also produce much, much more ash relative to volume consumed, have the potential clog your furnace mid-run and to produce slag (coke and coal are much worse when it comes to clogs/clinkers) at brass melting temps du…

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    If you can secure a coal (ideally anthracite) supply, coking it is easy enough --the process is similar to making charcoal via distillation method. Alternately, you can start a coal fire in a container and when the coal you can see on top of the fire turns white, dump the whole mess into a tub of water. Give it a rinse and once it dries out, you'll have a good grade of coke. Or, you could take the lazy path and just get a lid for your crucible. ; )About the author's mention of charcoal briquettes; they do win out over lump charcoal in terms of ease of acquisition but they also produce much, much more ash relative to volume consumed, have the potential clog your furnace mid-run and to produce slag (coke and coal are much worse when it comes to clogs/clinkers) at brass melting temps due to the presence of clay binders used to hold the briquettes together. Long story short, all four fuels will do the job with minor variations in what you'll need to do while the furnace is running so it's going to come down to a judgment call on your part. Good luck and happy casting!! :D

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  • It's hard to tell from the pictures; what was the original width of the skis and the final width of the bow limbs? I definitely like the water bucket as a fast-and-dirty, mostly self-managing tillering machine *squirrels away info for later exploit*.

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  • Not sure when I'll ever have an opportunity to tan a salmon hide, but definitely filing this away just in case. One question: could you re-create the tanning solution with distilled water, 1-0-0 fertilizer, and clear ammonia?

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  • Wait...I thought Epsom Salt is magnesium sulfate... Now I'm confused. \: l

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