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32CommentsJoined March 12th, 2017
continual student of various sciences and human behavior
  • Simple Watering Can (cost; FREE!)

    I really like this project! I think I will look for a container (with handle) appropriate for my 3YO grandson. I think I'd also drill a vent hole a little further down the handle so that water would be less likely to come out when pouring.

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  • DavidE341 commented on GaryNDayton's instructable Back Yard Office6 weeks ago
    Back Yard Office

    I've actually found their articles to be most informative and describes current best industrial practices. They usually do not have detailed project plans in their magazine but do provide guidance for more experienced persons with their projects (e.g., a shed project from 2012 https://www.finehomebuilding.com/2012/07/23/how-to-build-a-garden-shed-introduction?source=W20001EN&tp=i-H43-BC-F5J-ivA8w-1o-25Nw-1c-iv9AT-lCCRe&sourcekey=W20001EN&utm_campaign=fine-homebuilding-eletter&utm_source=eletter&utm_medium=eletter&utm_content=fhb_eletter&cid=57989&mid=663782474). If you are looking for detailed "how to" plans, you would be better served to look up other magazines (Family Handyman, Wood magazine, etc.) for detailed how-to plans.

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  • DavidE341 commented on rhallett's instructable Turn MDF Into Marble 2 months ago
    Turn MDF Into Marble

    Very impressive! If you are trying to create a "marble" slab (for a table top for instance) do you use the same technique on the edges of the MDF or do you need to create a thinner slab and then miter/connect both pieces to continue the pattern from top to sides?

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  • DavidE341 commented on QAmakes's instructable Modern 5-elements LED Lamp (bars)2 months ago
    Modern 5-elements LED Lamp (bars)

    Nice work, but IMO too much work to light a room/space that you only use occasionally. Lots of discussion on other forums about how to adequately illuminate garages, work areas, basements, etc. Most often recommended solution is some form of LED shop light (usually in 4' or 8' lengths) or replacement LED "bulbs" for existing fluorescent light fixtures. Many models interconnect and can often be found at very low prices (compared to your time to construct same). See examples at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=led+shop+light&ref=nb_sb_noss_1

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  • DavidE341 commented on WesH31's instructable Building a Sun Room4 months ago
    Building a Sun Room

    Good guidance for others who may want to do something similar. However, there was no info on the siting for your room. My 40-year experience (7x18 sunroom facing West with small South face) is that any sunroom in the 48 contiguous states is much more a 3-season room due to the extreme radiant heat loss of the windows (most 2-pane windows are around R-3 so when you do the math there's not much stopping discomfort sitting near the windows; 3-pane windows are better, but weight much more and are more expensive). And if the room is facing South (or even West) there is too much solar gain in the late "shoulder" months and Summer for comfort. So IMO unless you have some sort of outstanding South, West (or even Eastern) view, the best way to site a sunroom is to the North. Much coole...

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    Good guidance for others who may want to do something similar. However, there was no info on the siting for your room. My 40-year experience (7x18 sunroom facing West with small South face) is that any sunroom in the 48 contiguous states is much more a 3-season room due to the extreme radiant heat loss of the windows (most 2-pane windows are around R-3 so when you do the math there's not much stopping discomfort sitting near the windows; 3-pane windows are better, but weight much more and are more expensive). And if the room is facing South (or even West) there is too much solar gain in the late "shoulder" months and Summer for comfort. So IMO unless you have some sort of outstanding South, West (or even Eastern) view, the best way to site a sunroom is to the North. Much cooler in the Summer/shoulder months (and no sun glare), a draw in the Winter months.One additional comment is that I would have never include a wood stove in that space unless it had an external combustion air source, and would never locate it where the flue had to penetrate 2 rooflines - every penetration is a possible leakage source. I would have either gone with a radiant electric unit (even one that included a faux fireplace look) or located the wood stove in one of the remote corners with a flue exiting so there was no roof penetration.

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  • DavidE341 commented on jones424's instructable How to Build a Motorized Pedal Car6 months ago
    How to Build a Motorized Pedal Car

    Sorry, I find myself more in the camp with yrralguthrie. Those original pedal cars were always very poorly engineered (not enough room for child with leg strength to actually push the pedals, sloppy steering, top-heavy balance, poor wheel bushings, etc.) and the replicas were no better. I think your effort would have been better spent on refurbishing the free electric Yamaha Raptor which should have been relatively easy to do since you ferreted-out the electrical problems anyhow. Or create a completely new, better-engineered kids vehicle from the Raptor drivetrain.

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  • DavidE341 commented on ynze's instructable Loudspeaker Design by Trial and Error8 months ago
    Loudspeaker Design by Trial and Error

    Just thought of another reference I'd recommend to anyone - the Loudspeaker Design Cookbook by Vance Dickason.

    Thank you very much for writing this instructable! I am just now returning to the world of speaker building from a fairly long absence and find your observations of the audiophile world to be quite accurate. I have also found that speaker placement more affects perceived sound quality than speaker design (the reason your speakers were on the table in the "audition room" photo). Room modes, reflectivity and tweeter alignment with the listener's ear (not pointed up or down) greatly impacts listening impressions. I also found that early studies of human listening done by Bell Labs in the '50s is very instructive on speaker drivers, crossover points and human perception. I would also like to encourage you to think about other designs as ported enclosures really only affect bass-ra...

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    Thank you very much for writing this instructable! I am just now returning to the world of speaker building from a fairly long absence and find your observations of the audiophile world to be quite accurate. I have also found that speaker placement more affects perceived sound quality than speaker design (the reason your speakers were on the table in the "audition room" photo). Room modes, reflectivity and tweeter alignment with the listener's ear (not pointed up or down) greatly impacts listening impressions. I also found that early studies of human listening done by Bell Labs in the '50s is very instructive on speaker drivers, crossover points and human perception. I would also like to encourage you to think about other designs as ported enclosures really only affect bass-range frequencies so you are much more free in the design of mid/high frequency drivers/enclosures (e.g., hybrid systems coupling ported bass with infinite baffle or sealed enclosure) keeping in mind how we humans perceive sound at the crossover points. Am now following so keep up the good work!

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  • DavidE341 followed ynze8 months ago
      • Serious Speakers on a Budget
      • Loudspeaker Design by Trial and Error
      • Make Your First Serious Amplifier
  • DavidE341 commented on GaryNDayton's instructable Back Yard Office8 months ago
    Back Yard Office

    Don't want to dominate this conversation, but I just came across a video of a designer/homeowner who designed/built a home near Chicago that you might find interesting. He talks to many of the same design points I already mentioned.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1-SohaHfOk&list=PLtOuBSUfZX7rA4Cm2Lmi6W-Ua-yper4xV&index=2

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  • DavidE341 commented on GaryNDayton's instructable Back Yard Office8 months ago
    Back Yard Office

    I think you need to give yourself more credit - most homeowners today are almost completely ignorant of any strides in building science made in the last 10 years. Regarding windows - the 10% figure is one I've seen recommended by several solar/passive designers. It makes sense if you only put glazing on the south wall (east/west too problematic with overheating in shoulder months; north gives you some ambient light but no solar gain). It is a compromise in design between window heat loss penalty at night and need for daylighting (or a view if you have one). Get a good interior lighting design using lots of LED strip lighting (and maybe a ULED TV with an outdoor HD camera) and you will never need the windows you think you need. Just a hold-over design of trying to impress others with how...

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    I think you need to give yourself more credit - most homeowners today are almost completely ignorant of any strides in building science made in the last 10 years. Regarding windows - the 10% figure is one I've seen recommended by several solar/passive designers. It makes sense if you only put glazing on the south wall (east/west too problematic with overheating in shoulder months; north gives you some ambient light but no solar gain). It is a compromise in design between window heat loss penalty at night and need for daylighting (or a view if you have one). Get a good interior lighting design using lots of LED strip lighting (and maybe a ULED TV with an outdoor HD camera) and you will never need the windows you think you need. Just a hold-over design of trying to impress others with how many windows a house has (from the days when windows were REAL expensive and used by the Downton Abby crowd). It's why the real estate/builders still call the street-side of a house "the money side".Regarding ventilation - stick to fixed glass panels and mechanical ventilation (with at least MERV 13 filtration in both the ventilation unit and the heating/AC unit). Lower cost, better seal, no reliance on you needing to be present to manually "doing the right thing" (think sudden rain storm, changing weather front, etc.), less security issues, works way better than trying to rely on random wind patterns and thermosyphoning, cuts down on increased interior humidity, de-stratifies temperatures within the rooms, decreases indoor air quality issues. Also - plan for separate dehumidification system in addition to the heating/AC system for shoulder months.

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  • DavidE341 commented on GaryNDayton's instructable Back Yard Office8 months ago
    Back Yard Office

    Gary - If I were building a true small house, I'd strongly recommend you read up on Passive House concepts and recent Passive House builds. Given that, I'd go with an insulated slab-on-grade foundation (no drafty, damp basements or crawl spaces), conventional 2x4 framing (with the wall details as I previously mentioned) to keep material/assembly costs lower, raised-heel roof trusses (to allow for additional insulation over the outside wall areas as well as a vented attic area). Concentrate on air/vapor/thermal/weather protection boundaries - including best practice for handling drainage for window/door rough openings. No combustion appliances (including fireplaces or stoves) indoors; dedicated venting (to outside) for baths and stove top. As much insulation as you can afford (regardless...

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    Gary - If I were building a true small house, I'd strongly recommend you read up on Passive House concepts and recent Passive House builds. Given that, I'd go with an insulated slab-on-grade foundation (no drafty, damp basements or crawl spaces), conventional 2x4 framing (with the wall details as I previously mentioned) to keep material/assembly costs lower, raised-heel roof trusses (to allow for additional insulation over the outside wall areas as well as a vented attic area). Concentrate on air/vapor/thermal/weather protection boundaries - including best practice for handling drainage for window/door rough openings. No combustion appliances (including fireplaces or stoves) indoors; dedicated venting (to outside) for baths and stove top. As much insulation as you can afford (regardless of what is currently recommended by Energy Department). Stick to the 10%-of-floor-area gauge for the amount of summer-shaded window size you will need to balance between enough "daylighting" and evening heat loss. All (triple) glazing towards the south if it can be designed (no bedrooms requiring emergency egress on the north side). I would also "experiment" with installing attic baffle chutes all the way from the soffit vents to the high point (ridge if peaked; front if flat roof sloped up to south). I have a working theory that encapsulating the underside of the roof accelerates air flow and reduces radiation to the attic interior. I'd also provide outside access to the attic area vs. having some hatch or pull-down stairs in the interior. Lots of real good info readily available that has not yet become "common" building techniques.

    Good first effort and I will encourage you to either get a magazine subscription to Fine Homebuilder or (probably better) a subscription to their web site so you can read previous articles so you can see what is truly "best industry practice" today as most of what is commonly built is just to local building codes. The saying in the building science world is "code-built houses are the cheapest houses builders are legally allowed to build". Also - the three worst enemies of construction are water, water, water.That being said I would have gone about this much differently (and have been thinking about doing something similar for some time). I would have done the framing in the same way, but used Huber Zipwall/tape/liquid sealant for the sheathing, under floor and top of...

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    Good first effort and I will encourage you to either get a magazine subscription to Fine Homebuilder or (probably better) a subscription to their web site so you can read previous articles so you can see what is truly "best industry practice" today as most of what is commonly built is just to local building codes. The saying in the building science world is "code-built houses are the cheapest houses builders are legally allowed to build". Also - the three worst enemies of construction are water, water, water.That being said I would have gone about this much differently (and have been thinking about doing something similar for some time). I would have done the framing in the same way, but used Huber Zipwall/tape/liquid sealant for the sheathing, under floor and top of ceiling joists to provide an exterior air barrier for all 6 surfaces (no need now for an interior barrier like is done with drywall and much easier to do properly). I would have then installed the rockwool insulation on the outside of the sheathing (including the floor and more on top of the ceiling than on the walls) to eliminate conduction through all the framing. I would then install vertical 1x3 stringers or "dimple mat" on the outside of the walls to provide a behind-the-cladding drain surface, and either vinyl siding or maybe the oak you used in a vertical board-and-batten design. With this method, you would not need to do any interior finishing other than staining or painting the frame members and interior side of the sheathing (if acceptable). I fear your exposed tar paper will not last very long and your oak siding will remain wet much longer without a drainage plain on the back. I would also use some form of exterior-swinging windows as you did (at least double-pane but preferably triple-pane) but only 10% of the square inches of the floor area and only facing south. I have reservations about using a casement window on edge as the mechanicals are not engineered for those loads and I would fear premature failure. I would also have incorporated roof overhangs of 24" on all sides to better protect the walls from weather, and would have integrated some sort of shading for the south-facing windows that allowed winter sun to enter but not summer sun.Again, good first effort. Consider it a learning exercise and start investigating/planning for version 2.0.

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  • How to Fix Corroded Battery Terminals

    Very good instructions! Done this many times myself. I would only add that I also use a water displacement/penetrating oil (e.g., WD40, Kroil) during the sanding phase as it helps cut through the surface rust.

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  • DavidE341 commented on louisdevaux's instructable VW Golf Tiny Roadtrip House9 months ago
    VW Golf Tiny Roadtrip House

    I know it is out of your budget, but look up Napier tents. They have several models that convert pickup trucks, vans, etc. into much more roomy campers by adding a tent structure onto the open rear area. You may be able to construct something similar with a used tent, some ripstop nylon material from a fabric store and some heavy-duty exterior tape (e.g., Gorilla Tape). At the very least you can clip additional reinforced polyester tarps to the sides of your awning to block wind and rain. Harbor Freight has very inexpensive tarps and spring clips. You may also want to reconsider your mattress. Typical foam absorbs moisture from the air. Most motorcycle campers prefer a 2-level system; an inflatable mattress for comfort and a closed-cell foam pad for insulation (either from the ground or...

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    I know it is out of your budget, but look up Napier tents. They have several models that convert pickup trucks, vans, etc. into much more roomy campers by adding a tent structure onto the open rear area. You may be able to construct something similar with a used tent, some ripstop nylon material from a fabric store and some heavy-duty exterior tape (e.g., Gorilla Tape). At the very least you can clip additional reinforced polyester tarps to the sides of your awning to block wind and rain. Harbor Freight has very inexpensive tarps and spring clips. You may also want to reconsider your mattress. Typical foam absorbs moisture from the air. Most motorcycle campers prefer a 2-level system; an inflatable mattress for comfort and a closed-cell foam pad for insulation (either from the ground or from the air mattress as they are notoriously cold).

    I was going to suggest the use of "no-see-um" screen mesh around the open hatchback if the weather is warm. Several examples available where small van and Honda Element campers made a screen cover to allow ventilation but keep bugs out. Usually held onto the vehicle body with rare earth magnets. Might even want to also add a screen insert for a partially-open front window for cross ventilation.

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  • DavidE341 commented on MarcFinns's instructable AtmoScan1 year ago
    AtmoScan

    I think this is just fantastic! I am a former residential energy auditor and have always balked at the current idiom of "build it tight and ventilate it right" mantra and the associated cost of blindly using mechanical ventilation using outside air. The USA has a very comprehensive outside air quality index reporting system and my area is prone to having higher ozone (which I would not want to blindly pump into anyone's house). But in all the cheerleading, there has been no efforts to actually measure indoor air quality at an affordable level so that everyone would actually do it. I even sent a suggestion to Google to integrate indoor IAQ measurements into their Home product. If you can get this design down to the place where an electronics build firm (lots around) can mass pr...

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    I think this is just fantastic! I am a former residential energy auditor and have always balked at the current idiom of "build it tight and ventilate it right" mantra and the associated cost of blindly using mechanical ventilation using outside air. The USA has a very comprehensive outside air quality index reporting system and my area is prone to having higher ozone (which I would not want to blindly pump into anyone's house). But in all the cheerleading, there has been no efforts to actually measure indoor air quality at an affordable level so that everyone would actually do it. I even sent a suggestion to Google to integrate indoor IAQ measurements into their Home product. If you can get this design down to the place where an electronics build firm (lots around) can mass produce at affordable prices, you will have done modern civilization a great favor - to have indoor IAQ measurements as ubiquitous as thermometers and relative humidity gauges. Good on you!

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  • DavidE341 commented on rephus's instructable Live Picture Frame With Raspberry PI1 year ago
    Live Picture Frame With Raspberry PI

    I also thought of this several years ago and posted it on an advanced home building forum as a way of reducing cost (windows and doors for high-performance houses are still a huge cost item). I got a huge negative push-back! Everyone wanted to look outside (even if there was no view) and "throw open the windows" even if you had a much better automated ventilation/heating/cooling system. The reaction just made no sense given the non-conventional construction mentality, but I still think it is an excellent idea - just stream videos from a GREAT view somewhere else in the world. Interestingly, one of the big box stores now offers a large-scale OLED television with a frame to look like the author's - only about 10X larger. Hmmm... Even with the higher cost of a large-format televi...

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    I also thought of this several years ago and posted it on an advanced home building forum as a way of reducing cost (windows and doors for high-performance houses are still a huge cost item). I got a huge negative push-back! Everyone wanted to look outside (even if there was no view) and "throw open the windows" even if you had a much better automated ventilation/heating/cooling system. The reaction just made no sense given the non-conventional construction mentality, but I still think it is an excellent idea - just stream videos from a GREAT view somewhere else in the world. Interestingly, one of the big box stores now offers a large-scale OLED television with a frame to look like the author's - only about 10X larger. Hmmm... Even with the higher cost of a large-format television my idea would still be less expensive than the initial cost and long-term energy loss of conventional glass high-performance windows. And it would be ideal for basement or poor-view apartments. You could even incorporate a hi-def exterior camera for an outside view when desired.This gets my vote!

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  • Portable Height Adjustable Table or Standing Desk

    The height is variable, depending on the length of the side chains. I wanted a sturdy but light weight folding structure as a camping stove platform but all the camping kitchen setups were too short for me (was looking for something like 38" tall) and too costly. Decided to get this simple stand, set the chain length to create the proper height, create a wooden top structure that would sit on top (maybe use locator pins or a perimeter frame) but was still easy to disassemble and move. It is very stable, easy to fold up/move around and I will never have the rated weight on it (200#).

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  • Portable Height Adjustable Table or Standing Desk

    I would be very leery of the support an ironing board would provide since the base legs are so narrow (my wife uses one frequently and it is easily knocked over). I plan on building a similar stand as a portable camping stove table, but I am using a Harbor Freight 200# capacity portable work stand (https://www.harborfreight.com/200-lb-capacity-portable-work-stand-38778.html) as a base. It is much more stable and a low-cost item that I don't feel it is an extravagance. Set the side chains to whatever height you need it to be.

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  • Flat-Pack Lantern Attachment for Any Headlamp (DIY Diffuser)

    I made this (no photos) but did not initially understand that it is basically a small 5-sided box (the top being 2 layers). May be OK for backpacking where every ounce and square inch makes a difference. Seemed too involved for what I was looking for. Instead, I took an empty 32 oz (946 ml) #1 plastic coffee creamer container (this plastic is much more opaque than the other listed plastic so light is more diffused), rinsed out thoroughly, removed brand wrap, and cut off the upper part of the container where the container narrows for the screw-on/pop-top lid to fit the LED flashlight/headlight of your choice. This creates a very nice 7" or so "tube light" that is not too large but works well. If you really need a more compact form, you could cut it in half lengthwise so bo...

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    I made this (no photos) but did not initially understand that it is basically a small 5-sided box (the top being 2 layers). May be OK for backpacking where every ounce and square inch makes a difference. Seemed too involved for what I was looking for. Instead, I took an empty 32 oz (946 ml) #1 plastic coffee creamer container (this plastic is much more opaque than the other listed plastic so light is more diffused), rinsed out thoroughly, removed brand wrap, and cut off the upper part of the container where the container narrows for the screw-on/pop-top lid to fit the LED flashlight/headlight of your choice. This creates a very nice 7" or so "tube light" that is not too large but works well. If you really need a more compact form, you could cut it in half lengthwise so both halves nested in each other and then use rubber bands to hold it together when using.

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  • DavidE341 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-401 year ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    As others have already said, WD40 will dryout and the clear plastic will "fog" again. Problem is new plastichas a protective coating but hardens when exposed to UV light. Mechanicallyremoving the oxidation may temporarily restore clarity, but also removesprotective layer so there is no protective coating anymore. So if you do go the"buff off the oxidation" route, you definitely need to apply either aclearcoat spray or monthly application of protectant. Lots of info on the netbut the one I'm currently trying (on clear plastic auto headlight lenses) ismonthly cleaning with Original Windex to remove bug guts and then coating with 303 UVProtectant. If I could have found it I would have tried the Meguiar's HeadlightProtectant. Others have also recommended carnuba (not syn...

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    As others have already said, WD40 will dryout and the clear plastic will "fog" again. Problem is new plastichas a protective coating but hardens when exposed to UV light. Mechanicallyremoving the oxidation may temporarily restore clarity, but also removesprotective layer so there is no protective coating anymore. So if you do go the"buff off the oxidation" route, you definitely need to apply either aclearcoat spray or monthly application of protectant. Lots of info on the netbut the one I'm currently trying (on clear plastic auto headlight lenses) ismonthly cleaning with Original Windex to remove bug guts and then coating with 303 UVProtectant. If I could have found it I would have tried the Meguiar's HeadlightProtectant. Others have also recommended carnuba (not synthetic) auto wax and acouple products available from www.autogeek.net(Wolfgang plastic surface sealant and Diamondite Clear Plastic LiquidArmor).

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  • How to Build a Great Shed, Base Upwards

    Good work! I debated in my mind for many months what I wanted, how much I wanted to pay, how much ongoing maintenance I wanted to contend with and how difficult a project I wanted. I ended up going with a packaged 8'x10' UV-resistant plastic kit (that had a full floor, 6 skylights and 4 windows for interior illumination, 2 full-depth shelves and a double door for over 3' opening and about 6' 3" minimum headroom with more in the center) from our local "big box" store, a used/never installed steel shed floor brace, 4 solid concrete blocks and a little over 2 sheets of pressure-treated 3/4" plywood. I set up the concrete blocks as a floating level foundation, assembled the steel bracing and sat that on the concrete blocks, fastened the plywood to the steel bracing with ...

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    Good work! I debated in my mind for many months what I wanted, how much I wanted to pay, how much ongoing maintenance I wanted to contend with and how difficult a project I wanted. I ended up going with a packaged 8'x10' UV-resistant plastic kit (that had a full floor, 6 skylights and 4 windows for interior illumination, 2 full-depth shelves and a double door for over 3' opening and about 6' 3" minimum headroom with more in the center) from our local "big box" store, a used/never installed steel shed floor brace, 4 solid concrete blocks and a little over 2 sheets of pressure-treated 3/4" plywood. I set up the concrete blocks as a floating level foundation, assembled the steel bracing and sat that on the concrete blocks, fastened the plywood to the steel bracing with exterior wood screws and assembled the plastic kit on top of that. Worked out extremely well, looks much better than anything I could have come up with, absolutely NO periodic maintenance, and it could also be used as a playhouse for my grandchildren if I decide to clear out the 2 lawn mowers, fertilizer spreader, 2 bicycles, 1 motorcycle and a lot of sundry hand tools/pump sprayers. I think I spent less than $1100 total and it took me maybe a week total.

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  • Floating Shelf W/ Hidden LED Lighting

    Very cool project! Woodworking (including jigs), electrical work, cool specialty hardware, well-done video - you rock! Only caveat I have is that I've seen where the self-adhesive on these LED strips is not all that stellar - I would think wood would be particularly troublesome - so many have gone to a different mounting method (either the extruded aluminum or something else that can be mechanically fastened).

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  • DavidE341 followed darbinorvar1 year ago
      • Floating Shelf W/ Hidden LED Lighting
      • Build a Bed From a Sheet of Plywood
      • Modern Nightstand W/ Concrete Top
  • DavidE341 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-401 year ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Phosphoric acid does a real good job of neutralizing rust and converting it so it doesn't spread (various spray/brush-on liquids available now that contain phosphoric acid; usually has the word "Rust" in it somewhere) and it doesn't affect non-rusted metal (unlike vinegar or citric acid) but it doesn't remove the rust down to bare metal. For that you need to either use electrolysis or mechanical abrasion, and then some sort of coating to prevent flash rust and future deeper rust.

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  • DavidE341 commented on bcronin's instructable Coleman Stove (case) Refurbished 1 year ago
    Coleman Stove (case) Refurbished

    I don't know if you are attached to this group or not, so I'll just throw it out:http://www.colemancollectorsforum.com/andhttp://www.oldcolemanparts.com/home.php

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  • Collapsible Camping/emergency Stove.

    I don't know if the fumes from Everclear are dangerous or not, but I do know that the fumes from galvanized metal are - so the metal lathe used for a grill cannot be galvanized (stainless steel or titanium would be fine).You can also use the commonly-available and easy to find fuel line antifreeze (in the yellow bottle, not the red/orange) as a fuel, but again probably not for grilling.

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  • DavidE341 commented on BruceP28's instructable Toy-Drop Camper1 year ago
    Toy-Drop Camper

    I think this converted cargo trailer (and your previous version) are just terrific! I also saw something today that would fit right in with your minimalistic kitchen: our big-box store has a Copper Chef Pro single-burner electric inductive cooktop/pan combo on sale for $50. Only heats up the pan so you can do any pan-related cooking (fry, saute, steam, warm) in a small area with very little fire hazard with a very compact footprint.

    Best tip I've found for cutting foam board is to get a 6" drywall taping knife and sharpen one (curved) edge. Then use it as a draw knife to cut the foam. Much larger and stronger sharpened edge. Most of the polyurethane adhesives should work (as well as the foam-in-a-can) as long as the metal roof is clean first (use acetone or TSP).

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  • DavidE341 followed electric-vehicles, speakers, home-improvement, rockets and 21 others channel 1 year ago