author
3Instructables8,126Views12CommentsAustraliaJoined June 29th, 2018
Just a hobbyist. I make stuff from wood, play with my CNC Router/Laser and generally just turn big bits of wood into sawdust and smaller bits of wood. Made some furniture pieces, a couple wooden clocks and so on, but nothing super skilful...

Achievements

  • Making & Using a Shooting Board and Mitre Board

    Two perfectly good questions.The first answer is actually pretty simple. If you look at the bottom of the standard bench plane or jointing plane (the cast iron bodied style in the picture), you’ll see that the blade doesn’t actually reach to the very edge. This means that on the very first time you use the shooting board, the plane will slightly shave away a tiny bit to the board itself. However because the blade doesn’t reach across the full width of the plane, the blade leaves behind a nice surface for the plane body to slide on (along the very bottom). If you were to extend the blade out further than “normal”, it would again reach the shooting board itself.the most important features of any shooting board are the angles (the whole point is to cut things nice & “square”) and the ...

    see more »

    Two perfectly good questions.The first answer is actually pretty simple. If you look at the bottom of the standard bench plane or jointing plane (the cast iron bodied style in the picture), you’ll see that the blade doesn’t actually reach to the very edge. This means that on the very first time you use the shooting board, the plane will slightly shave away a tiny bit to the board itself. However because the blade doesn’t reach across the full width of the plane, the blade leaves behind a nice surface for the plane body to slide on (along the very bottom). If you were to extend the blade out further than “normal”, it would again reach the shooting board itself.the most important features of any shooting board are the angles (the whole point is to cut things nice & “square”) and the “backstop” (I’m not sure of the correct term). If the back edge of your material isn’t supported against the back of the shooting board, you risk having the plane break splinters away from the back edge of the board at the very end of each cut.The question regarding how do you get the angles correct, unfortunately the answer is something along the lines of “trial and error”. The good thing, is having gotten it right, you’ve then got a really useful tool. The less helpful thing, is that you may need to spend some time (and more than a few prototypes) before you get it right.Making a shooting board (or boards), is one of those “weekend” type of projects. Spend a bunch of time making, tweaking, swearing, remaking and retweaking until you get right. If you consider it as one of those enjoyable, frustrating, but ultimately worthwhile projects that add to your overall skills, the time is never wasted.Or, if that’s not your thing, just go and buy one. A shooting board is kinda like the Woodworker’s toolbox or tool cabinet. It shows a bit of skill, a bit of personality and can be something that ranges from an exquisite work of craftsmanship, to a couple of bits of wood that are nailed together and are “pretty close” to being square.Not sure if that fully answers your questions, if not send me another message and I’ll try and be a little more concise...Regards,David.

    View Instructable »
  • Making & Using a Shooting Board and Mitre Board

    In my defence, I’ll point out the photo was staged purely for the purposes of making the Instruction. I too was always taught it to be good practice to always place a tool such as a bench plane on its side to protect the blade and the bottom surface from damage. Something that I “normally” follow...

    Thanks, hopefully it was of some use for you.

    View Instructable »
    • Making & Using a Shooting Board and Mitre Board
      471 views
      4 favorites
      1 comments
  • DavidSkeptic commented on DavidSkeptic's instructable Simple and Elegant Wooden Box10 days ago
    Simple and Elegant Wooden Box

    Thanks, have a look here, I added some info regarding the use of a shooting board. https://www.instructables.com/id/Making-Using-a-Shooting-Board-and-Mitre-Board/

    View Instructable »
  • DavidSkeptic commented on DavidSkeptic's instructable Simple and Elegant Wooden Box12 days ago
    Simple and Elegant Wooden Box

    Hi,Thanks for the feedback. I've added some info on Shooting Boards and Mitre Boards. Hope this will help explain - if not send me any questions and I'll get back to you...https://www.instructables.com/id/Making-Using-a-Sh...

    Many thanks for your kind words. I've just added a bit more stuff on using a Shooting Board or Mitre Board if you're interested...https://www.instructables.com/id/Making-Using-a-Sh...Regards,David.

    View Instructable »
  • DavidSkeptic's instructable Simple and Elegant Wooden Box's weekly stats: 7 weeks ago
    • Simple and Elegant Wooden Box
      547 views
      8 favorites
      0 comments
  • Adding Wooden Splines and Some Nice Feet to Your Wooden Boxes

    My apologies for the slow reply, I've been crazy busy at work...I have a home made CNC Router, based upon the XCarve (Google "Inventables" and look at their XCarve machine). Essentially, this is a router which is controlled by a PC and can be moved around in the same manner as a 3D printer. I can basically create a design and then tell my CNC to cut that shape or pattern out for me - similar to designing something and then printing it.Lettering like I've done here is a subset of CNC machining called V Carving. This uses a pointed, V shaped bit, to cut patterns and letters. Varying the depth, causes the width to vary and by cutting shallower and shallower, we can actually cut patterns with sharp corners (not typically possible with a rotating bit).Whilst I don't have a picture ...

    see more »

    My apologies for the slow reply, I've been crazy busy at work...I have a home made CNC Router, based upon the XCarve (Google "Inventables" and look at their XCarve machine). Essentially, this is a router which is controlled by a PC and can be moved around in the same manner as a 3D printer. I can basically create a design and then tell my CNC to cut that shape or pattern out for me - similar to designing something and then printing it.Lettering like I've done here is a subset of CNC machining called V Carving. This uses a pointed, V shaped bit, to cut patterns and letters. Varying the depth, causes the width to vary and by cutting shallower and shallower, we can actually cut patterns with sharp corners (not typically possible with a rotating bit).Whilst I don't have a picture at hand, I made a House Number for my letterbox using this method, where the number were cut into a block of hardwood. Came out really well and I was quite happy with how it looks.With the right software, pretty much any font can be cut, so doing your house number would be very simple.

    View Instructable »
    • Adding Wooden Splines and Some Nice Feet to Your Wooden Boxes
      875 views
      4 favorites
      15 comments