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  • Simply heating the crystalized honey will make it molten, but it will just recrystallize once it returns to room temperature. Furthermore, heating it uncovered will cause moisture loss which allows even easier crystal formation.If you want to keep old honey fluid, you should turn the sucrose into invert syrup by acidifying it while you heat it. Add ~1/8 tsp of citric acid or cream of tartar per pound of honey and keep the temp below 140°F.In invert sugar, the sucrose molecules are broken down into its constituent molecules of glucose and fructose. Neither of these molecules prefer to be in crystal form as much as sucrose does, and the whole mixture is actually sweeter due to fructose being ~200x sweeter on its own than sucrose.The resulting honey will remain more fluid, taste sweeter b…

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    Simply heating the crystalized honey will make it molten, but it will just recrystallize once it returns to room temperature. Furthermore, heating it uncovered will cause moisture loss which allows even easier crystal formation.If you want to keep old honey fluid, you should turn the sucrose into invert syrup by acidifying it while you heat it. Add ~1/8 tsp of citric acid or cream of tartar per pound of honey and keep the temp below 140°F.In invert sugar, the sucrose molecules are broken down into its constituent molecules of glucose and fructose. Neither of these molecules prefer to be in crystal form as much as sucrose does, and the whole mixture is actually sweeter due to fructose being ~200x sweeter on its own than sucrose.The resulting honey will remain more fluid, taste sweeter but it may not behave entirely the same as pure honey for cooking applications where you need sugar to carmelize. It may function as a dough conditioner in baking.

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