author
26Comments

Tell us about yourself!

  • DennisT33 commented on Scarlet08's instructable Cement Towel Plantpot
    Cement Towel Plantpot

    What an interesting project! I just wanted to double check that you used ‘cement’ and not concrete mix or mortar. I’m pretty sure you wouldn’t confuse the two but readers might. Secondly, I’m guessing that these are cotton towels and that after months or years the cotton might rot and the pot break apart. Have you tried other non-cotton equivalents such as light polyester blankets, cut to size?Finally, thrift stores are great places to get old towels (and blankets). Thanks!!!

    View Instructable »
  • Laser Etched Flames on Denim Jeans

    Has anyone tried photoactivatable chemicals that might cause laser decolorization even better? What comes to mind as possibilities is oxalic acid, boric acid, or ferric chloride.

    View Instructable »
  • Harbor Freight has a decent dust collector that I use with a 55g barrel with a tornado top that I got somewhere, I think a woodworking store. This uses 4" hose, and like this 'ible the barrel fills first and the filter gets very little, mainly tiny particles.

    View Instructable »
  • Great 'ible and a great method. I've been doing this for a while. Two comments to enhance, possibly:1) Once in a while the glue will break free, usually by pushing the board backwards on the sled. I added a thin cleat at the back end of the sled to keep the board from moving backwards to prevent this. 2) you can make a simple torsion box sled simply by gluing thin sheets of plywood to front and back of a scrap piece of foam insulation board. Glue them on your flattest surface.

    A torsion box that is 2" thick is roughly as rigid as a 2" thick board but much lighter. The reason is that almost all of a board's rigidity derives from the surfaces and is increased by the distances between them.

    View Instructable »
  • DennisT33 commented on makendo's instructable Fidget Centrifuge

    There is a commercial device that does this, called the AirFuge. The rotor is about the size of a walnut and the tube hold 0.4 ml. It reaches tremendous speeds (60k RPM as I recall) and the decompressing air keeps the whole thing cool).

    Brilliant! I'd have used this every day when I was in the lab!This reminds me of the 'card spinner' that is used to spin hematocrit capillaries. This is a disk of cardboard with holes punched to hold thin blood capillaries. It's powered by a loop of twine through the center, by intermittently pulling the loop apart, the disk spins left then right. Your device could similarly be powered by looping through the middle (without the bearing).

    View Instructable »
  • This is a fantastic idea! Did you see a way that the latch might be moved to the inside, so that it could be secured?

    View Instructable »
  • DennisT33 commented on DIYJRAY's instructable Bed Slats Improvement

    Gluing the slats down makes the frame less movable, and the cross-wise glue interface will weaken every time the wood moves mechanically or with weather. The best slat frames are held in place with unglued dowels. You can use your plan for setting up the slats, and then drill a hole through the slat into the frame, before dropping a short dowel into the hole (perhaps with a drop of glue at the bottom only). I agree that some fabric beneath the slat will prevent creaking when you move in bed.

    View Instructable »
  • Actually, the traditional glass cleaner is basic, i.e. household ammonia. Glad that your concoction has reached the perfect pH.

    View Instructable »
  • Several of these and other homemade cleaning recipes mix chemical bases (washing soda, baking soda, ammonia) with acids (vinegar, citric acid). After an initial reaction, the solution will be composed of a salt and a reduced activity of both the base and the acid, i.e. the ammonia and the vinegar will form ammonium acetate, a rather innocuous salt, and neutralize both the acid and the base. I wonder if the recipes would work better with *either* the acid or the base, rather than both?

    View Instructable »
  • For acrylic sheet people use strip heaters to soften an area of sheet clamped to a bench, and then bend it much like a sheet metal brake. You can use a propane torch but it's easy to singe it and the area of bending is not as confined.This trick for PVC pipe is pretty clever, and is likely the only approach that doesn't risk kinking the tube. I have deformed PVC pipe with a torch (i.e. to pinch a constriction near the end) but it wouldn't suffice to bend a tube like this.

    View Instructable »
  • That does sound like a different situation. All connections should be in a closed work box, but a modern plastic cable needn't be metal sheathed. Assuming you would still want the powered cable to your light (and that its in the ceiling), you should go to the home store and get a "ceiling electrical junction work box for old work". This will likely be circular or octagonal, and will have a way of securing it to the ceiling flush with the drywall. You can then run the wires from your light to that box, put the cover on the box, and paint the box to match the ceiling. You aren't allowed to cover a junction box with drywall, since it has to stay accessible, but the box is usually hidden by the ceiling fixture. If you don't want to do that, you should find where the powered …

    see more »

    That does sound like a different situation. All connections should be in a closed work box, but a modern plastic cable needn't be metal sheathed. Assuming you would still want the powered cable to your light (and that its in the ceiling), you should go to the home store and get a "ceiling electrical junction work box for old work". This will likely be circular or octagonal, and will have a way of securing it to the ceiling flush with the drywall. You can then run the wires from your light to that box, put the cover on the box, and paint the box to match the ceiling. You aren't allowed to cover a junction box with drywall, since it has to stay accessible, but the box is usually hidden by the ceiling fixture. If you don't want to do that, you should find where the powered cable originates, and disconnect that. It's likely at a switch box. You can leave the unpowered cable in the wall, though I'd suggest labeling it 'disconnected'. I didn't mean to make it sound like 'anything goes' in home electricity; code is there for a reason. However, it is unreasonable to think that all boxes and conduit has to be metal, these days.

    "Sometimes just wires going to lighting fixtures directly without outlets..." That's exactly how it's supposed to be. Another comment suggests that all wire has to be sheathed in metal, which is not so. Plastic coated Romex is to code and used in new construction. The important thing is that the connectors have to be in an approved plastic or metal box. That is what is (or should be) under your ceiling light fixture (not an 'outlet') and is what this person did in the extension of the circuit to a separate box that looks to be of approved type to me. Low voltage lines are run all over homes without boxes; think about your 24V doorbell wire. No, they, shouldn't be in boxes with 120/240, but they don't need to be in separate conduit. Can't testify to a six inch separation …

    see more »

    "Sometimes just wires going to lighting fixtures directly without outlets..." That's exactly how it's supposed to be. Another comment suggests that all wire has to be sheathed in metal, which is not so. Plastic coated Romex is to code and used in new construction. The important thing is that the connectors have to be in an approved plastic or metal box. That is what is (or should be) under your ceiling light fixture (not an 'outlet') and is what this person did in the extension of the circuit to a separate box that looks to be of approved type to me. Low voltage lines are run all over homes without boxes; think about your 24V doorbell wire. No, they, shouldn't be in boxes with 120/240, but they don't need to be in separate conduit. Can't testify to a six inch separation but that does seem appropriatate, even as a 'recommendation'.

    View Instructable »
  • I'd use a wide mouth (e.g. juice) bottle with the same principle.

    Bravo! Having invented not a few mousetraps myself, this trumps them all, and all of the commercial options in terms of simplicity, reusability, and and humanity. A 'humane' trap is not only for 'haveaheart' but because cleaning up a bloody or soggy mess is never fun.

    View Instructable »
  • Looks great, the only problem is that Christmas is upon us so it will have to be next year's presents!Years ago I made an end-grain chessboard with 1/2" thick 2.25 inch squares. I had a major problem with checking and cracking with changes in humidity, and it wound up in the fire. Since then I have learned about PEG (polyethylene glycol), a food-safe waxy material that enters the wood pores and prevents shrinking and cracking; woodturners use it for bowls, usually starting with green wood.Have your boards shown any cracking? Have you or others used PEG as a first or final finish?

    View Instructable »
  • Very nice, and quite satisfying to wear spices. Can you smell them when it's finished? Nutmeg has an interesting pattern, a cross section of nutmeg would be nice too.One suggestion on your otherwise excellent discussion of resins: Polyester is a resin that is commonly used to make fiberglass, together with glass fiber cloth. The resin itself is just polyester resin, and is hard, as you say. Some people also make fiberglass with epoxy, especially in the boating industry.

    View Instructable »
  • DennisT33 commented on wold630's instructable 1-Ingredient Crackers

    We cook ours on a sheet of baking paper (which is like parchment, but is siliconized) on a cookie sheet; won't stick!. Cook until crispy at about 250dF. The crisps spread out some, but not much. The paper can be reused, though it gets greasy.

    View Instructable »
  • The pastel eggs are from a special breed of chicken called an Araucana. They have cute little sideburns, but are otherwise varied in color. One hen always lays the same color; their eggs tend to be a little smaller than other breeds.Love your write up!

    View Instructable »
  • DennisT33 commented on tjayfowler's instructable Spectra Loop Splice

    While this is likely to hold for anything you might use it for, the proper knot for 12 braid hollow core line (like Spectra) is the Brummel splice. In the knot you use, the tail could conceivably work its way out by reversing the steps you use. The Brummel passes through the line twice (as this one does) but once by the head, and once by the tail. Thus it is not reversible. This means you need a free head and tail, but there is a way of doing it (really clever) by everting the pass throughs and then re-verting them to make the proper knot. There is an animation at Greg's knots:www.animatedknots.com/brummel/Done this way it doesn't need a whipping (not such a bad boy) but a good whipping does look pretty classy...Thanks for showing the tricks about a wire fid and the nice whipping demo…

    see more »

    While this is likely to hold for anything you might use it for, the proper knot for 12 braid hollow core line (like Spectra) is the Brummel splice. In the knot you use, the tail could conceivably work its way out by reversing the steps you use. The Brummel passes through the line twice (as this one does) but once by the head, and once by the tail. Thus it is not reversible. This means you need a free head and tail, but there is a way of doing it (really clever) by everting the pass throughs and then re-verting them to make the proper knot. There is an animation at Greg's knots:www.animatedknots.com/brummel/Done this way it doesn't need a whipping (not such a bad boy) but a good whipping does look pretty classy...Thanks for showing the tricks about a wire fid and the nice whipping demonstration.p.s. I realize this is an ancient post, but the link above may be valuable to someone...

    View Instructable »
  • There should be no need to use an IoT cloud for this. One 8266 module as 'server' to control a relay, another receiving pushbutton input, and an android device that can program either and control the circuit remotely. The future is not turning on a desk lamp from your smartphone, but designing houses that don't need 14ga copper going to both the ceiling lamp and two separate wall switches. I want to be able to turn on my lights even if easyIoTCloud goes out of business!

    View Instructable »
  • For those with an abundance of coco waste, one word: biocharhttp://biochar-international.org/biochar/#32 save the planet

    View Instructable »