author
2Instructables5,916Views50CommentsAustraliaJoined October 4th, 2015
I love making instructables about insect that I own and love, I enjoy helping people out and love when they post a comment on an instructable, I try to reply as soon as possible, and help you out as much as I can. DB
  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    No prob! It's been great working with you and Zombug. Best wishes for the eggs!

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Oh wow! She has grown incredibly, and her color has changed so much too! Thankyou so much for the pic, it's been great going through Zombug's journey

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Sounds like a good idea, I will admit the eggs are quite a task.

    They will continually lay eggs pretty much until they die, so the best thing is to remove the ones in the cage and place them into a different terranium and spray them once or twice daily. They can take anywhere from one to four years to hatch by what I've heard. I ended up releasing mine to the wild so I am unaware of how long they took to hatch.

    I'll add a pic

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    I can imagine! They get huge! Has she got her wings yet?

    Those should be it, she'll be laying eggs in no time now.

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  • DragonB2 followed JamiT22 years ago
  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Ah yes, that should mean she'll be molting in no time at all! And yes after this final 'last molt' would mean she is in adulthood and will no longer grow. A good way to check if she is fully grown is look along her neck and back area, she should have very large wings, not alike the males and it has no actual wing material in which they can fly but it does look very similar to wings. She will probably start laying a few weeks after her last moult. Stick insects are a parthenogenic animal, which means they use their own cells to reproduce, meaning the offspring will be copies of herself. There should be no male required. Good luck with her last moult! ^_^

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Ah yes, this happened to my stick insect as well. I belive this happened before her very last molt, this will mean her next moult will be her final size and she will be laying eggs after. If she starts laying eggs without molting it shouldn't be an issue.

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    I totally agree! I remember when mine used to open there pinchers and look around for it. It was very funny! Mine used to stay on the lid 24/7 as well, it is really quite interesting how intelligent the bugs can be! Seems like she is having a great time. :D

    That sounds great. She'll be having a great life with all the special treatment she is gettingm she sure is a lucky bug! Regarding the age, mine lived to about a year and six months so I would say the maxium would be two years. Considering the care she gets I think she'll be around for a while! :D

    Wow! She has really grown, and so quicky too! She seems to love her water though. It is so cute watching them sit there for ages! :D

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Oh wow she looks so big now! It's great to see she was all good.

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    She sure does! She's so big lol

    She probably will

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    She may be preparing to molt, so the blood is circulating more, causing the darker color. It also may be the new skin developing, so the current skin is turning lighter. Hope she's all good :)

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Hmm that seems strange. I've noticed that Zombug is a more greenish color that my previous stick bugs so this might be normal. Have you ever seen her underside before and it's been black. My stick bugs were orange on the top and red underneath, so perhaps the black is normal? If you can send a picture that would be great.

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Hmm that's strange. Hopefully Zombug will be a healthy adult ;)

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Oh she looks great, such healthy color to! Nice and light on the top and dark around the edges. She looks like a hungry little fella! How's she going with the tempature?

    Hmm, that is a good question. I haven't owned any males before but I have heard they can die after mating. This may sound a bit strange but do you still have the dead carcass of the male? If so, if he has any bite marks the female may of attacked him. Spiny leaf insects aren't generally insects that commit cannibalism, but the female may of felt threatened.Other than that he most likely died of mating, as in many insect species the male will not live long. Another cause could be he was poisoned by the host food, if the female died soon after that could most likely be the cause.

    No problem! :D

    Seems like she's all good then, stick insects will generally vary their eating, but before molts they will usually decrease water and food intake. I'd say she has about 3-4 molts before she's an adult. :)

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Haha thanks, talk to you soon! :D

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    That's a good question. Since it's so hot here in Australia I am usually used to prevent the heat. But in the area I live it tends to get reasonably cold during the winter months, and when this happened I would usually have mine inside and they seemed to be perfectly fine. To keep them from getting to cold I would reduce the misting and sometimes I wouldn't have the water very cold, but very close to lukewarm or room temperature water when I'd mist them, I hope this helps but if you notice any unusual signs such as overly dulling color or slow molting (including the insect to struggle to molt) do feel free to contact me :)

    Oh she looks wonderful, I absolutely love the name too! And yes this is very normal, stick insect eat their molts for not only nutrients, but to hide all evidence they were in the area. Very sorry to hear about the other stick insect, but it's great to hear from you again! :)

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    That's nice, I've always wanted the own a reptile some day. Yeah, orchid mantids are pretty neat, I love the coloration but I think they are quite small, I'm not sure. I own two false garden mantids at home, I absolutely love them! I've always wanted some sort of predatory insect, I love watching it stalk and hunt the food.

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Yep, blackberry is fine, just make sure that's what it will continue eating ;). I don't really know of any way to tell nymphs apart, most people think nymphs are just a small version of the adults, but they are actually black and red, after they have their first moult you'll be able to tell male/female differences. But I'm sure you won't be sold a nymph, when I went to purchase mine the smallest ones they had, they'd at least had their second moult. They look very similar when young, just look out for the tail spines :)All the best, DB

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    I'm really sorry to hear about Boogie, although those pictures look really cool. I'm glad to hear that you would want to adopt a spiny sometime, they are great pets. I reccomend keeping a small glass bottle in the cage and putting the leaves in the bottle with water, makes them last much longer, and my spiny seems to like it much better. I live in Australia, so it's really easy to get a spiny. Although I'd reccomend choosing the biggest you can find out of them. And make sure the coloration isn't black and red, therefor they are a nymph. Females are much fatter and have spines on their tails. If you can get a supply of eucalyptus, I'd reccomend using that as a food source.All the best, DB

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Here is a pic of mine, sorry about the bad lighting, I only managed to take it at night, but yes the spines of mine are about a centimetre or so long, so they are pretty big, I'm not sure if you can see the eggs in her tail though. Anyway, yes thankyou a video would be great, but it's no hurry. :) I might be able to get a better picture tommorow.DB

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Would you hapoen to be talking about these? (Pic) If so, that is all natural. Females use to it lay eggs, when I manage to get back from school I will take a picture of my spiny who is laying just so I can show you what they look like when laying :)All the best, DB

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    This spiny seems to be very...different. I noticed earlier you had said she had her fifth moult, after this they are adults, otherwise I would say she is struggling to moult. Also if she is still plump then there are no signs of death as you can see in the image this spiny looks 'wilted' and is a darkish color, the head is also tucked inwards (sorry if I posted three) I noticed my spiny's tend to have an odd looking seisure, but a egg would just flick out of their tail, this used to happen earlier but nothing would happen. Is the end of her tail fat? If so I suggest she is struggling to lay eggs, is there any way you can upload a video of the spiny's behaviour, if so that would be great.DB

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  • DragonB2 commented on DragonB2's instructable How to Feed your Praying Mantis3 years ago
    How to Feed your Praying Mantis

    Mantises do have great eye sight and are surprisingly smart, she probably knew that bee was dangerous, if she was a nymph she probably wouldn't go for it either^^I have heard that they eat ground beef, it's quite interesting. I recently bought two containers of pinhead crickets, I got luckily when I was gardening the other day and managed to find another mantis. It was quite skittish at first and it's front legs were trapped some how, now it's perfectly fine and ate it's first cricket. I find crickets are great for those extra skittish mantises. :)

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  • DragonB2 commented on iman's instructable how to care for a praying mantis3 years ago
    how to care for a praying mantis

    I own a purple winged mantis, which I found in my backyard, it looks very similar to the mantis under 'Feeding The Beast' I'm not sure how regularly I should feed it

    I own a purple winged mantis, which I found in my backyard, it looks very similar to the mantis under 'Feeding The Beast' I'm not sure how regularly I should feed it

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  • DragonB2 commented on DragonB2's instructable How to Feed your Praying Mantis3 years ago
    How to Feed your Praying Mantis

    Feel free to post comments

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    Unfortunately, I have seen that happen to many of my spinys, they would gently lay there and make the slightest movement, if she looks red and a bit like a dried raisin, then she is probably dead, I don't happen to have a facebook account although you could upload it, copy the link then paste it in the comment box and I might be able to watch it. It is hard giving up an insect, such great pets to have, but over time I have learnt lots about caring for them better, they seems to prefer a small bottle with water in the cage and stuffed with leaves and also enjoy being alone better, the one I have a home know is about the third one I've bought, the ones of the picture are currently dead after eating minature rose leaves. I am thinking of updating this instructable slightly. Going back to m...

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    Unfortunately, I have seen that happen to many of my spinys, they would gently lay there and make the slightest movement, if she looks red and a bit like a dried raisin, then she is probably dead, I don't happen to have a facebook account although you could upload it, copy the link then paste it in the comment box and I might be able to watch it. It is hard giving up an insect, such great pets to have, but over time I have learnt lots about caring for them better, they seems to prefer a small bottle with water in the cage and stuffed with leaves and also enjoy being alone better, the one I have a home know is about the third one I've bought, the ones of the picture are currently dead after eating minature rose leaves. I am thinking of updating this instructable slightly. Going back to my spiny, I have had her for about three months now and she is living fine, laying eggs and is full adult. She had lost a leg, but otherwise she is fine.

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  • DragonB2 followed stacyah and DragonB23 years ago
  • DragonB2 commented on stacyah's instructable How to Make Gutload (for insects)3 years ago
    How to Make Gutload (for insects)

    Great help

    Easy to make and was dirt cheap, do I just leave it in the cage once frozen?

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  • Taking Care of Australian Spiny Leaf Insects

    First thing that I notice a cause was probably a sudden change to rose leaves, judging by the idea she has been eating blackberry majority of her life she has probably experienced a shock to her body, for the idea she is falling over I would recommend putting her in a small cage with paper towel at the bottom and a few blackberry leaves. Also check around the cage for any predatory insects. It might also be a good idea to place some water on a leaf of film of plastic or non-poison flat surface that isn't absorbable. Allow your leaf insect to drink as much water as possible to drain out any rose leaf fluidI think the brown fluid from the tail is a form of feces, she is probably trying to extract as much rose leaf fluid as possible. I am unsure about the brown fluid coming out from her le...

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    First thing that I notice a cause was probably a sudden change to rose leaves, judging by the idea she has been eating blackberry majority of her life she has probably experienced a shock to her body, for the idea she is falling over I would recommend putting her in a small cage with paper towel at the bottom and a few blackberry leaves. Also check around the cage for any predatory insects. It might also be a good idea to place some water on a leaf of film of plastic or non-poison flat surface that isn't absorbable. Allow your leaf insect to drink as much water as possible to drain out any rose leaf fluidI think the brown fluid from the tail is a form of feces, she is probably trying to extract as much rose leaf fluid as possible. I am unsure about the brown fluid coming out from her leg but it could be blood.Hopes this helps, best luck for your friend's insect.DB

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