author

EVcor

Inbox View Profile
6Comments

Tell us about yourself!

  • (3.0)CONVERTING a LEAF LEVEL 1 (12AMP) CHARGER TO a LEVEL 2 (12AMP) CHARGER

    I have now converted two chargers from 2011 Leaf but decided to make it multi-voltage, so it looks unchanged and I can still plug it into 110V outlet with the original plug, but it can also be fed 240V for fast charging. All I did was removing the 110V varistor and replace the transformer with a small 15V DC switching power supply. I found out by varying the voltage that a minimum 15V DC is needed for the pilot signal to work reliably. The charger will work on 12VDC but my Leaf refuses the signal (too low voltage on the pilot signal). I noticed that the relays cycle an extra time as if to go to fail-safe, but everything works great both at 110 and 240V. I still use the original NAME 5-15 plug so it looks original after swapping the transformer to the supply.

    View Instructable »
  • (3.13)CONVERTING a 2013 LEAF LEVEL 1 (12AMP) CHARGER TO a LEVEL 2 (12AMP) CHARGER

    BTW, to remove the 6 "corks" I drill a small hole in them, no more than 1/8" (3mm) and turn a screw into the cork, then pull both out with pliers. Using a corkscrew might be a hassle as it might not properly fit if you have an "official" open corkscrew, such as found on my Swiss knife and all my other corkscrews. Regular wood or sheetrock screws work fine to pull them out.

    View Instructable »
  • (3.13)CONVERTING a 2013 LEAF LEVEL 1 (12AMP) CHARGER TO a LEVEL 2 (12AMP) CHARGER

    OK, here the pictures. The first picture shows how I cut the standard NEMA 14-30 dryer cord's crimped spade terminals: red is cut back to just the wire crimp and the other 3 (which will be mounted under the 3 input cable screws) have one side of the spade cut off as they are too wide. Now they can fit under the screws. The only modifications I did to the charger itself after removing the input cord and plug: I cut the red wire close to the input screws, to be soldered to the red wire in the cord plus 2 layers heatshrink for protection of this splice, and I carefully scraped the plastic hole for the incoming cable slightly larger, as the cable jacket kept catching on the edge of the hole. Do not modify the rubber grommet, so the charger will still be water-tight. I soldered a small 22k r...

    see more »

    OK, here the pictures. The first picture shows how I cut the standard NEMA 14-30 dryer cord's crimped spade terminals: red is cut back to just the wire crimp and the other 3 (which will be mounted under the 3 input cable screws) have one side of the spade cut off as they are too wide. Now they can fit under the screws. The only modifications I did to the charger itself after removing the input cord and plug: I cut the red wire close to the input screws, to be soldered to the red wire in the cord plus 2 layers heatshrink for protection of this splice, and I carefully scraped the plastic hole for the incoming cable slightly larger, as the cable jacket kept catching on the edge of the hole. Do not modify the rubber grommet, so the charger will still be water-tight. I soldered a small 22k resistor directly onto the pins in the white connector (I used 24k but the result is same). You see the final result in the last 2 pics. The only needed materials are one resistor, 2 inches of heatshrink and a cheap NEMA 14-30 dryer cable. Hope this helps. I already charged by Leaf from the Dryer outlet. BTW, thanks for reminding me to add the pics.

    View Instructable »
  • (3.13)CONVERTING a 2013 LEAF LEVEL 1 (12AMP) CHARGER TO a LEVEL 2 (12AMP) CHARGER

    OK, I upgraded mine with a standard NEMA 14-30 dryer cord which was barely able to fit through the original cable gland. It was a hassle to take up the slack in the wire ends by looping them around, but the modification was super-clean, since the only real changes besides the different cord, were only the cut in the red wire on the circuit board and crimping that to the incoming red wire and soldering a 22k resistor in place of the connector for the NTC in the original cord.Once the enclosure was back together, there was nothing hinting at a modification of the charger, it simply has a different but still standard appliance cord. I will post pics as soon as I have them downloaded from my phone.

    View Instructable »
  • (3.13)CONVERTING A 2013 LEAF LEVEL 1 (12AMP) CHARGER TO A LEVEL 2 (12AMP) CHARGER

    Dave, I measured the device in the original 110V plug with the two extra yellow wires to be a simple NTC (temperature dependent resistor) to allow the EVSE to cut power when the plug gets too hot (bad contact, plugged into a corroded outlet and so on). As I posted in your other instructable, the frequency dependent charging (power throttling) is a function of the EVSE processor which will measure very accurately the period of the incoming AC line and if it sees a deviation from the nominal frequency, it will modulate the pilot signal to tell the EV to change its current draw and thereby adjust load (EV) to grid conditions.The two yellow wires in my EVSE plug are not connected to the incoming AC so they can't measure the AC period accurately, so it is not possible that they are part of a...

    see more »

    Dave, I measured the device in the original 110V plug with the two extra yellow wires to be a simple NTC (temperature dependent resistor) to allow the EVSE to cut power when the plug gets too hot (bad contact, plugged into a corroded outlet and so on). As I posted in your other instructable, the frequency dependent charging (power throttling) is a function of the EVSE processor which will measure very accurately the period of the incoming AC line and if it sees a deviation from the nominal frequency, it will modulate the pilot signal to tell the EV to change its current draw and thereby adjust load (EV) to grid conditions.The two yellow wires in my EVSE plug are not connected to the incoming AC so they can't measure the AC period accurately, so it is not possible that they are part of an FDR. I measured the resistance between the two wires at room temp to be about 21k Ohm and after a few minutes in the freezer it was 26k so it is an NTC embedded in the plug. replacing it with a 22k resistor and using a 4-wire plug will be the safest upgrade path, also avoiding the kluge with the external 240V wire.Hope this clarifies, Cor.

    View Instructable »
  • (3.0)CONVERTING A LEAF LEVEL 1 (12AMP) CHARGER TO A LEVEL 2 (12AMP) CHARGER

    Hi Dave, Magnus is right: it is a temperature dependent resistor. Mine is 21k at room temp and after a few minutes in the freezer, the resistance reads 26k Ohm. So I am sure that if the plug heats up, its resistance will drop and the EVSE will cut power. Besides my measurement data, there is also a simple reason why this device can't be an FDR: For accurate frequency response, the frequency must be measured very carefully. How can a device that is *not* connected to the AC wires, but insulated in a glass body, measure the AC frequency? I am sure that the EVSE processor is doing the FDR, by using its crystal to run an accurate clock and measuring the incoming AC periods very accurately and modulating the pilot signal to match any deviation from the nominal frequency (60 Hz in USA). This ...

    see more »

    Hi Dave, Magnus is right: it is a temperature dependent resistor. Mine is 21k at room temp and after a few minutes in the freezer, the resistance reads 26k Ohm. So I am sure that if the plug heats up, its resistance will drop and the EVSE will cut power. Besides my measurement data, there is also a simple reason why this device can't be an FDR: For accurate frequency response, the frequency must be measured very carefully. How can a device that is *not* connected to the AC wires, but insulated in a glass body, measure the AC frequency? I am sure that the EVSE processor is doing the FDR, by using its crystal to run an accurate clock and measuring the incoming AC periods very accurately and modulating the pilot signal to match any deviation from the nominal frequency (60 Hz in USA). This functionality will be *unaffected* by soldering a resistor of about 22k across the pins where the yellow wires were, since that will just tell the EVSE that the plug is always at room temp - obviously now you need to take care of not overloading the plug and keeping contacts clean. Or get yourself another NTC to replace the one in the plug! Hope this helps, Cor.

    View Instructable »