author
1Instructables7,686Views9CommentsRaleigh, NCJoined August 23rd, 2016
Registered nurse who decompresses by trying to make interesting things. X-carve owner. Amateur woodworker

Achievements

  • EdK31 commented on Stevens Workshop's instructable Sycamore Epoxy River Table6 months ago
    Sycamore Epoxy River Table

    Awesome job! Thanks for sharing!!

    View Instructable »
  • EdK31's instructable Fiber-Optic Accented Outdoor Concrete Bartop/Table 's weekly stats: 8 months ago
    • Fiber-Optic Accented Outdoor Concrete Bartop/Table
      4,871 views
      83 favorites
      24 comments
  • Fiber-Optic Accented Outdoor Concrete Bartop/Table

    Need?!? I think everyone needs a 320# outdoor table that lights up.Individually controlling the color of different bundles would be cool. I'm not sure how best to do that. This uses a 'light engine' that looks like a projector of sorts and the color is all or nothing across the entire trunk of fibers. I don't think with this you could have some one color and some another. Using LED's and a controller instead of fiber optic or as the light engine(s) might give you more options, but I can't offer much in experience or expertise on that idea.

    Thank you! The Epcot pavers are where I maybe first saw this as well. They were definitely in my mind as I started researching. There are a couple places online doing some amazing commercial work with inset resins and/or glass as well as lighting which lent some information/inspiration as well. In the end this took some time and planning (could've used a bit more planning honestly) but it wasn't really super difficult or stressful. It was a fun project and the final result is definitely fun to sit at and drink a beer while running the grill.

    A sidewalk would be interesting. It would present different challenges, like a bigger, longer, fiber trunk. I think my filament bundle was 10' long. Flipping it was done with 3-4 people, very slowly and carefully. It is a beast. Fortunately I had a 4'x8' assembly table on wheels that we poured it on. Being able to roll it out of the way, was a big advantage while it cured. We did drill holes into the melamine form to set the fibers as you describe if I understand correctly. The hot glue I was a little worried would damage the fibers thermally, so I would squeeze a little puddle onto a piece of cardboard, dip the tip of the fiber in it, then push it into the hole drilled in the melamine. We drilled the holes all the way through the 3/4" melamine. If you look at some of the d...

    see more »

    A sidewalk would be interesting. It would present different challenges, like a bigger, longer, fiber trunk. I think my filament bundle was 10' long. Flipping it was done with 3-4 people, very slowly and carefully. It is a beast. Fortunately I had a 4'x8' assembly table on wheels that we poured it on. Being able to roll it out of the way, was a big advantage while it cured. We did drill holes into the melamine form to set the fibers as you describe if I understand correctly. The hot glue I was a little worried would damage the fibers thermally, so I would squeeze a little puddle onto a piece of cardboard, dip the tip of the fiber in it, then push it into the hole drilled in the melamine. We drilled the holes all the way through the 3/4" melamine. If you look at some of the dark pictures right after we poured the concrete, you can see how the fibers on the leading edge protrude. The ones on the table top all extended 3/4" when we flipped it and peeled the form off as they couldn't be inserted all the way through because they hit the table beneath the form. The ones on the front edge of the table and in the sink well we just let hang out. Zipped to the support wire and set into the melamine 3/4", I'm not even sure the glue was necessary. My fears of the hot glue melting the fibers seemed unfounded. We had no problems with that though we were actively limiting the amount of heat as best we could.

    Thank you. I will definitely consider mixing dye as a possibility and yes, though I've never tried it, I am now a firm believer in using a concrete vibrator when casting into forms.

    View Instructable »
  • Fiber-Optic Accented Outdoor Concrete Bartop/Table

    Thank you. I certainly don't think I could do it any less than 1", but you may be right about 1.5". I've had to move it twice now and it is a beast so my next experiment will be how thin/lightweight I can do this. I'm not sure we lost any fibers that were inset in the concrete. It was right where they emerged from the bottom that maybe a dozen of them broke. You can see them in the picture. That was about the time I noticed them, the table had been flipped at least twice by then. I actually bought some 'splicers' for fiber optic on amazon but they were for a larger size of fiber and never really worked plus they were heat-shrink so I was a little nervous about putting a lot of heat near these plasticish fibers, 90% of which were working.

    View Instructable »
  • Fiber-Optic Accented Outdoor Concrete Bartop/Table

    I did sand this table with the optics in place however, I had put a drop of epoxy on each one. Sanding concrete (and I just used an orbital electric sander - I understand there are beefier ones and special discs but I used a standard 60 grit I think was the roughest pad I had) is pretty slow going and I can't say it did a lot to the finish.I used stain, so I can't speak to mixing dye into the concrete. Stain worked well and had few drawbacks I can think of so I would choose it again unless I wanted to experiment.The holes were tiny. I broke 2 or 3 of the smallest bits in my set drilling the 150 holes. The fibers are 0.75mm diameter according to Amazon which is about 1/32 of an inch. They weren't exactly snug, hence the hot glue gun to stabilize.I hope this helps...

    These folks seem to imply you can sand fibers in concrete without complication.http://www.fiberopticproducts.com/Fiber_optic_coun...

    View Instructable »
  • EdK31 followed Home Improvement, Tools, Reuse, LEDs and 29 others channel 1 year ago