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  • Tutorial to Interface HX711 Balance Module With Load Cell

    Do you have a specific reason for connecting the white and green wire of the load cell the way you did?In your instructions, the white wire "Output+ (O+), Signal+ (S+)+ or Amplifier+ (A+)" is connected to pin 3 (A-) in J1, which goes to pin 7 (INNA, Ch. A Negative Input) of HX711, and the green wire "Output- (O-), Signal- (S-)+ or Amplifier- (A-)" is connected to pin 4 (A+) in J1, which goes to pin 8 (INPA, Ch. A Positive Input) of HX711.Also, what do the notations "(S+)+" and "(S-)+" mean? Typo/copy-paste error?

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  • ForssFägerström commented on MaxPower1977's instructable Make a Ring from a Nut2 years ago
    Make a Ring from a Nut

    Your, umm, nuts, being from the early 80's AND from the petrochemical industry, are surely of the best quality available back in the day, and like you figured, must have cost a small fortune. Nowadays, however, 'stainless steel' in most cases merely denotes a steel grade that can (barely) tolerate neutral liquids. Anything significantly higher or lower than Ph7 will indeed corrode or 'stain' the metal.For all 'rust-proof' / 'rust-free' applications, 'acid-proof' steel should be used. I don't know what the English term for this steel grade is, but is is much more expensive than the regular stainless. What I'm trying to say here, I suppose, is that people shouldn't be surprised if/when their 'stainless steel' nut rings start irritating the skin and/or turning brown...

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  • Forged Damascus Chain Knife - Drop Point Hunter

    OK, thanks for the clarification. Truth be told, I found it hard to believe that a guy who can produce a decent-looking knife like this one did not understand the necessity of forging the edge. I just wish you had mentioned this step, even if there were no photos of it, as there seems to an ever-increasing amount of people who think that 'stock removal' is a actually legitimate method of making blades.Anyway, nice tutorial, and good pics. Most likely very helpful to many people. Kudos.BTW, You should not experience any significant carbon loss at normal forging temperatures, even as high as dull yellow. Forge-welding temperatures (bright yellow / yellow-white) are a different matter, obviously.

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  • Forged Damascus Chain Knife - Drop Point Hunter

    The term 'damascus' is nowadays, and has been for decades, used to describe pattern-welded steel, regardless of the material(s) and the procedure used to obtain the pattern. A (multi-wire) cable is obviously made of one type of steel only, yet still yields an interesting pattern. A motorcycle drive chain, which is similar to the material used in this instructable has, as far as I know, somewhat different steel in the links/rivets and the connecting plates.Anyway, I am a nitpicking mofo, and well-aware of the history, yet even I accept this terminology. Also, forging a multi-layer billet from straight and level plates is much easier than dealing with a cable or a chain.

    With 'normal' even-layered billets that is generally true, but damascus made of chain or cable should, due to the shape and construction of the original material, yield a pattern even with no forging or grinding. Looking at the pics of the final product, I doubt forging would have made the pattern less prominent.All in all, I reckon my primary 'issue' here is that I cannot see the reasoning for completely skipping the forging of the edge. That very process, combined with the material selection and the heat treatment steps, IS what makes a piece of steel a blade and not just a decorative object.

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  • Forged Damascus Chain Knife - Drop Point Hunter

    Hold on, did I miss something, or did you not forge the edge, but used 'stock removal' instead? Why?

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  • ForssFägerström commented on replayreb's instructable Installing a TV in a sauna2 years ago
    Installing a TV in a sauna

    You are right, your setup should not pose any significant condensation issues, no matter what the material of the TV 'window' is. You have a quite big sauna, the stove is of the regular kind, and, located on the same wall as the TV. Also, the TV is fairly low, maybe ~50cm from the ceiling.In my setup, however,1) the stove is a 6.5kW 'always ready' unit with about 100-120kg of stones2) the stove is located on the opposite wall of the TV3) the fresh air intake is directly above the stove4) the air exit vent is on the TV wall near the floor5) the TV is only 20cm from the ceiling6) the sauna is less than 8m^3In a scenario like mine, you can have quite a low temperature in the sauna, yet massive amount of energy stored into the stones. Throwing water on the stones will (obviously) form hot w...

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    You are right, your setup should not pose any significant condensation issues, no matter what the material of the TV 'window' is. You have a quite big sauna, the stove is of the regular kind, and, located on the same wall as the TV. Also, the TV is fairly low, maybe ~50cm from the ceiling.In my setup, however,1) the stove is a 6.5kW 'always ready' unit with about 100-120kg of stones2) the stove is located on the opposite wall of the TV3) the fresh air intake is directly above the stove4) the air exit vent is on the TV wall near the floor5) the TV is only 20cm from the ceiling6) the sauna is less than 8m^3In a scenario like mine, you can have quite a low temperature in the sauna, yet massive amount of energy stored into the stones. Throwing water on the stones will (obviously) form hot water vapor that rises up and sucks out cool/cold air from the intake vent. The vapor will then hit the ceiling, traverse it (towards the opposite TV wall, but also to every other direction), and descend. The fresh air sucked from the intake vent will make the condensation effect much more prominent. In fact, the glass door of the sauna, which is perpendicular to the TV wall, will get fogged out all the way to the bottom of the glass (~10cm from the floor), while only the top half of the TV 'glass' (PC, that is) fogs.All in all, what I am saying here is that, before making any purchases and design/placement decisions, it is probably wise to consider ALL aspects of your plan, including the size and geometry of the sauna, the type, power, and location of the stove, the placement of the TV and the intake/exit air vents, the temperature handling capabilities of all materials, etc., etc. You should also take into account what exactly it is that you (mostly) want out of the setup. Me, for example, nowadays mostly lie down on a bench and listen to some music while the TV is showing e.g. a football match or a MotoGP race. In my case, it is important to be able to set up the the volume of individual speakers so that the 'focus' of the sound is where my head is. Also, being able to dim different parts of the lights separately is crucial, since reflection to the screen is totally different when I am lying down from when I am sitting up. In retrospect, I probably should have installed also a center speaker, but, as I watch movies in the sauna extremely rarely, I don't think this is an oversight I should lose too much sleep about.

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  • ForssFägerström commented on MaxPower1977's instructable Make a Ring from a Nut2 years ago
    Make a Ring from a Nut

    For example from eBay, see e.g. http://tiny.cc/Deez_eBay_Nutz or your country's own eBay site.A plate can be shaped into a ring by cutting a 'donut' and then slowly rolling/hammering it until you end up with a tube. The thickness of the ring will be at most the same as the plate, but probably less. The process also takes a lot of time and effort without special tools, and I would recommend rather buying either Ti nuts or tube/pipe for the starting piece of a ring.

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  • ForssFägerström commented on MaxPower1977's instructable Make a Ring from a Nut2 years ago
    Make a Ring from a Nut

    If you want a ring that will not rust or irritate your skin, use a titanium nut. You can also get a nice color (almost any color of the spectrum) by heating the ring.I recommend using the lower grades, provided that you can find nuts made of e.g. grade 2 Ti. The higher (alloyed) grades, such as the common Gr5, contain other materials, e.g., aluminium, and may thus be not completely inert to you skin. They are also much tougher to work with.

    You can join titanium pieces using a TIG welder, but you must use a bottom gas (in addition to the gas coming out of the torch). Other than this, welding Ti alloys is actually easier than working with Al. I am not aware of any other joining techniques for Ti, besides explosion welding of course, but I reckon that is not something you or any other sane person wants to experiment with...

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  • How To Make a Sword: A Comprehensive Guide

    Pure iron (wrought iron too) is much more expensive and harder to find than steel, and thus I can't see why anyone would even consider making a blade from it. More importantly, iron is non-hardenable, and therefore completely unsuitable blade material.Cast iron, on the other hand, contains (despite being called iron) way too much carbon (~4%), and therefore crumbles when forged. Titanium, which was praised as a superior katana metal in one of the 'Blade' vampire movies, can be hardened by quenching, but only up to about 42HRC hardness level, which is way too low even for a chopping blade such as a sword or an axe.-> A sword has a blade that is made of steel by forging and following proper heat treatment procedures. All other sword-looking objects are, at best, just decorative pieces....

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    Pure iron (wrought iron too) is much more expensive and harder to find than steel, and thus I can't see why anyone would even consider making a blade from it. More importantly, iron is non-hardenable, and therefore completely unsuitable blade material.Cast iron, on the other hand, contains (despite being called iron) way too much carbon (~4%), and therefore crumbles when forged. Titanium, which was praised as a superior katana metal in one of the 'Blade' vampire movies, can be hardened by quenching, but only up to about 42HRC hardness level, which is way too low even for a chopping blade such as a sword or an axe.-> A sword has a blade that is made of steel by forging and following proper heat treatment procedures. All other sword-looking objects are, at best, just decorative pieces.Thick coil springs from heavy industrial vehicles, such as trucks and trains, are well suited for sword blades. Big industrial ball bearings are also good, but less flexible, and much tougher to forge. With leaf springs I'd be somewhat careful because they are a deprecated method of suspension, and thus usually come from old and/or cheap and/or low-quality cars. This implies that sometimes (though not always) the steel used in leaf springs is not of the highest quality.

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