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Gabriel_S_PL

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Hello, my name is Gabriel, born and raised in south-east Poland. Even though my grandfather and father were working with wood all their lives I got interested in it in 2014. Somehow I didn't feel like crafting thing from wood. Now, that's (beside my regular job) thing I love: finding the right piece of wood and changing it into something new or diferent. I hope you will all enjoy my projects. Regrds from Poland Gabriel

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  • Epoxy River Coffee Table

    Hello, it had no affect, nothing hapenned. The wood was dried properly when I bought it, and all the work was done when it was really hot (about 35 degrees centigrade). So if your workshop is dry and warm there's nothing to be afraid of, you can go on with wet sanding!

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  • The orbital sander worked perfectly for me. It took some time, but it removed all the excess epoxy. Just remember to use dust mask.

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  • Unfortunatelly, I have no experience with temperature on my own. But as far as I know, properly mixed and cured resin should hold up to 230 degrees centigrade, but i strongly recommend looking into the Technical Specifications of your epoxy, you should find the answer to your question there.

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  • Hello,your problem might be the proportions of epoxy/hardener. It must be measured precisely. OTher thing to think about is the wood huminidty. 8-10% is good, otherwise it will bent while drying in higher temperature (when epoxy hardens it produces temperature).I water sanded my projects as well but it had no influence on the efect, so it shouldn't be a problem. Oiling my tables did not do any bad to them so I suppose it is not the problem either.All in all I think your problem might be in the precise measurement of the epoxy and hardener. RegardsGabriel

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  • I used walnut for my epoxy projects, but any type is ok in my opinion. Ash, oak or any other as long as it's the right looks, which you look for.For the bottom/ side I used packing tape like this https://alfaoffice.pl/images/99719.jpg and it worked fine. There are probably better ways to secure sides and bottom, but I didn't find them ;)Good luck on your work!

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  • Brand: Techniart, product: Techniplast 400. I found it and bought it over the internet.

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  • It was more or less 5 millimeters. Thanks to that it didn't boil.

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  • Whole slab was about 2,5 meters long and more or less 50 cm wide, 2 inches thick.It took about 3 kilograms of epoxy to fill th e gap.

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  • o'Dimensions of the gap are (more or less) length 110cm, width 5 cm and depth 4 cm. Not long ago I sold it and can't give you precise dimensons.I used about 3 kilograms of the epoxy. It was done a long time ago and can't remember exactly.

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  • To be honest, I can't remember ;) but more or less it was about 800 PLN which is 200$ I think.

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  • The resin is Techniart Techniplast 400 and I bought it from: www.allegro.plAnd thank you, always nice to hear that you like my work.

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  • Q 1: my brother bought them for me in some "metal shop", not shure where it was.Q 2: Hole were drilled, rods were cut and I just hamerred it all together.Q 3: Yes, just packing tape, in taped along and across a few times.

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  • It might be a good idea to do so, but still I didn't find a way to set the parts of the slab firmly, so they don't move and make the epoxy flow out to waste...

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  • Thank you for all the tips you gave here. Well, first thing is that, I was not sure how strong the epoxy is and I couldn't figure out how to stabilize the parts of the wood. It came through my mind to powdercoat the legs, but it would cost to much, so polishing it and covering with clear varnish was a better option for me and it just fits with the stainless rods.The idea was to make is as handmade as possible to reduce to cost of the table.And those tables you made are just awesome. They have all the thing I like: wood, steel, epoxy and the most important they are beautiful in their simplicity.

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  • Gabriel_S_PL commented on Banjas333's instructable Balance Bike DIY

    I was thinking about a bike like yours for my little cousin. Now I know how to get it done! Thanks for this great instructable! And nice job, well done!

    Of course, when it's only done, all the work will be here!

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  • That is an option, but I fear that acrylic might crash... The stainless tubes were fit pretty tight and after hammering the in place there was and is no way to separate parts of the slab. And, I did't wabt to use any glue because I have no idea what can happen to resin when it contacts the glue.

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  • If I had a plantation I'd probably quit my regular job and spend the rest of my life in the workshop making new things :) and of course you can, a little knowledge , good attitude and faith in your own abillities, some tools and place to work ;)

    Of course, there are different coloring powders for epoxy, just need to search the web ;)For now I wanted to try clear one, but who knows, maybe next time the epoxy will be colored ;)

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  • Thank you, my pleasure that I could make you smile :)

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  • Thank you very much Jim, I'm happy to inspire you. You may also want to look at my other project to get more ideas ;)

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  • I'm glad and very happy to be inpiration :) thank you

    Your table is really nice and from your instructable looks very easy to do. Great work!

    Actually I didn't think about it, but the steel rods here were fit pretty tight and hammered in the slab. After fitting them, there was no way to separate the slab pieces. Glass or plexy would probably be destroyed while doing that kind of stuff, and one thing for sure I didn't want to use any glue or that kind of stuff because I didn't know how would epoxy react with glue. I could have use resin to glues them, but it would complicate the project.

    There is a guy one hour drive from my hometown that has a lot of different types of wood (oak, ash, walnut) and asked him to show me what he has, picked this one and started the work ;) I'm from Poland btw ;)

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  • Paul, I used tape, 1st time across the slab, 2nd along the slab. Just in case I aplyed some paper to make sure that the corners of the ends are well shaped. It was just extra protection. And I screwed the whole slab to a piece of chipboard (it minimised the leak through the bottom). Anyways, the taping and the chipboard put the leaking to the minimum level. It was the only reinforce I used with the wood.With the first project there was a little problem with the leak, but caused by temperature of curing epoxy and the slab was not secured so the resin went it's way through. For better results I'd recommend using a tape that is not made of plastic, maybe masking tape would do better (it won't melt if the temperature occurs). I'm gonna have to try it myself next time.Waiting to see your resul…

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    Paul, I used tape, 1st time across the slab, 2nd along the slab. Just in case I aplyed some paper to make sure that the corners of the ends are well shaped. It was just extra protection. And I screwed the whole slab to a piece of chipboard (it minimised the leak through the bottom). Anyways, the taping and the chipboard put the leaking to the minimum level. It was the only reinforce I used with the wood.With the first project there was a little problem with the leak, but caused by temperature of curing epoxy and the slab was not secured so the resin went it's way through. For better results I'd recommend using a tape that is not made of plastic, maybe masking tape would do better (it won't melt if the temperature occurs). I'm gonna have to try it myself next time.Waiting to see your results of resin work.

    Thank you :)

    Htank you for the video, it lookes like it was easy and fun. Good job, nice coffee table!

    Thank you! :)

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  • Zbyszek, those pipes were just hammered in one piece, the other piece was carefully hammered as well. No glue, no screws, just a little force ;) but not to much to prevent the slab from damaging.

    I was afraid that the epoxy would not glue the wood together and it would just fall apart. It my second epoxy work with wood and still learning new things how it works

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  • Your welcome :) I'd love to see the results of your work

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  • Thank you very much :)

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  • So... In a comment below I gave info on the resin. You need mixing cups. What I found on the web is "3 cups mixing" - one for resin, one for hardener and one to mix the ingredients. Important thing is to mix small amout in a wide vessel. The reason is simple - large amount in a narrow vessel will imediately boil (resin produces high temperature while curing).So I bought the resin and the cups (like shown here, mine was 0,8 litre as far as I remember). Cups are avaliable online for sure and (in my case) a local car lacquer shop.To mix it together I used, already prepared, wooden sticks (like one of these).My epoxy is mixed in weight ratio, so I used an old weight (like this) to measure the right amount. And the ratios should be as precise as possible, otherwise the resin would cu…

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    So... In a comment below I gave info on the resin. You need mixing cups. What I found on the web is "3 cups mixing" - one for resin, one for hardener and one to mix the ingredients. Important thing is to mix small amout in a wide vessel. The reason is simple - large amount in a narrow vessel will imediately boil (resin produces high temperature while curing).So I bought the resin and the cups (like shown here, mine was 0,8 litre as far as I remember). Cups are avaliable online for sure and (in my case) a local car lacquer shop.To mix it together I used, already prepared, wooden sticks (like one of these).My epoxy is mixed in weight ratio, so I used an old weight (like this) to measure the right amount. And the ratios should be as precise as possible, otherwise the resin would cure to fast or... never cure.For safety, of course, latex gloves (click here) and and clothes that are only for dirty work. If you get a resin stain on anythig, you'll never wash it off.About the epoxy. There are diffferent types avaliable to buy, some mixed by weight other by volume with different ratios. Best would be 1:1 ratio, cause it's just easier to measure the proper amounts of resin and hardener. Good thing about epoxy is that, that it doesn't smell bad, and with caution can be mixed at home).I didn't check the temperature, it was hot like hell outside and sure about 20-25 Ceslius in my workshop, so the conditions were perfect for resin work.Hopefully I helped you a bit with your questions. With new projects I will sure document the process of measuring, mixing and pouring the resin, but for that you'll have to be a little patient ;)

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  • Doing other stuff with resin... a few years back my brother made motorcycle fairing with fiberglass and poliurethane resin (click here and here (lamp, freont fender and half of the rear end)) and I hleped him. It was like 4th or 5th thing done with this method. More or less I think i'd manage to make something out of galss or carbon fiber materials.You gave me an idea. There is a company,1 hour drive that makes resins (Ciech Sarzyna). Maybe they'd have some barely expired resin... anyways I still have about 3-4kg of epoxy to use, so I'll think about it in the future.

    There is a guy near my home town that sells wood. Almost anything you want, ash, oak, walnut,acacia and many many more. But... it's in Poland

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  • Of course I did a lot of research on the epoxy over the web. There are many types of epoxy (meaning resin-hardener ratio). After gathering all the knowledge I chose the 2:1 weight ratio. You are right that the further you go from the manufacturer instructions on the ratios the different the epoxy will be (more elastic or hard but still clear). There are types of resin that you mix with 1:1 ratio, but for the same amount I'd have to pay a lot (like 5 or 6 time) more than I did.

    Thanks. I'd like to see a picture of your glass copper table, must look awesome. What you say about cutting down on the hardener may be frustraiting. When doing it on purpouse you may expect the epoxy not to cure, but if you want it hard and be super crystal clear the A:B ratio must be exact. Otherwise, while sanding it would be like rubber. In my project I used a heat blower to help the resin cure and harden.

    Thanks for the ideas, however I did'nt want to colour the resin. And vibrating the resin? That might be something worth trying, will sure think about it next time ;)About the fumes, epoxy resin is much less smelly than poliurethane ones and, from my experience, can be prepared and poured indors. But of course ventilation is required, as always when working with chemicals.

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  • Thank you! Beautiful, a bit expensive but the way it looks polished makes it worth it :)

    Thank you! :)

    To be honest, I'm not sure if it did. But just like you said, it's about love, so any income is satisfying. The cash I got let me buy more resin and another slab of walnut, and I started another project already. As soon as it's done, a new instructable will be avaliable. And thank you, every comment on this makes me want to create something new :)

    Less hardener will make the epoxy cure longer and let all the air bubbles leave the mixture so it's glass-alike clear. Of course, smaller layers prevent the resin from boiling, and that's how I do it in my next project. Black dye you say? It would be different, but my first idea was to make it clear (as said in the instructable) and the seafoam effect was "accidental".

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  • thank you very much :)

    thank you very much :)

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  • Thank you, I'm glad that you like my work :)

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