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Galt

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61CommentsHeart of the American Gulag Archipelago
I enjoy helping people because I can, not because a politician stuck a gun to my head or some religious type tried to manipulate me through guilt.
  • Pizza, Wood Fired Oven Build

    I'm retired now, but was a professional; wonderfully done! You might consider taking those skills on the road. Properly masked up, of course. :)

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  • Galt commented on adriancubas's instructable Solar Coffee Maker
    Solar Coffee Maker

    Building an off-grid RV where the need for mobility and limited roof and storage space make every watt precious. Don't want to rely on any sort of combustion devices or fuels, so it's got to beelectric or direct from the sun. I've seen quite a few heliostats and Fresnel devices that would technically work, but typically they're geared toward larger cooking goals and would be unnecessarily bulky for my needs. I just want me coffee nice and hot without having to gobble up a chunk of battery power, so this is perfect, particularly your Occam's razor-like design. Very compact and easily collapsed for portability and storing, quite unlike most of the other overly complicated devices that I've seen. Thank you very much for sharing.

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  • How to Make Great Burgers at Home

    We raise Kunekune pigs, so the grass fed extends to your pork too - it's a completely different food from the CAFO garbage, and the lard is to absolutely die for! If you want a little more flavor try adding ground chuck to ground sirloin and some nice chewy back fat from a grass fed pig. I go with a little fat heavier 75/25 blend 'cuz the lard renders and leaves everything nice and juicy. Hadn't even considered the effect that over-mixing the meat was having all of these years, so thanks for settin' me straight. Guess what's for dinner? ;)

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  • Sweet and Savory Soft Pretzels

    You had me at "pretzel". Can't wait to try them!

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  • Intelligent Bat Detector

    Always love your stuff. Brilliant, as usual. :)

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  • Galt commented on peterbrazil's instructable Rat Rod Mower Kart
    Rat Rod Mower Kart

    Too cool for school.Awesome build!But now ya need more power, so here ya go; Flathead, of course. ;)https://handhflatheads.com/turn-key-engines/

    Meant to say that your build immediately brought to mind images of my old Hawk model company Weird-Ohs of my 60's youth. Thanks for the nudge. :)https://www.pinterest.com/rickrwatkins/weird-ohs/

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  • Galt commented on Nodnal3's instructable Umbrella Grapple
    Umbrella Grapple

    Quite ingenious really. You should be working for "Q". ;)

    Very well done, but I must admit, the entire time I was reading along I just couldn't stop from asking myself "why?". Is the surreptitious untying of others' shoes some kind of "thing" that I just missed? Or perhaps, is this just one of the weirdest fetishes ever? Either way, awful lot of work for a practical joke, but I suppose it has its uses, other than messing about with other people's shoes. Too funny.

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  • A Commuter's Electric Bike

    Read some great articles on disc vs. rim brakes, as well as fat vs. skinny tires and tread impact that you might enjoy over at Compass Tires/Renee Herse Cycles. Also, Will Prowse of mobile-solarpower.com has some pretty great battery & BMS build and product review videos.

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  • A Commuter's Electric Bike

    - Flat road, no pedaling, at say 30 mph, how far do you suppose you might get? - How much do you weigh? Considerable variable between 8 and 12 stones. ;)- Would there be any advantage in filling the main frame triangle with a larger battery compartment, thereby providing for a lower center of gravity overall? Seems that the ideal would be to have a good fore and aft balance with a bit more over your traction wheel and a bit less on the steering, but as low to the ground as possible. Your layout seems to accomplish this pretty well, but I am curious about the overall stability at higher speed?Lastly, how's the braking performance? There's been plenty said and written about the pros and cons of rim vs. discs, especially regarding wider tired bikes, but I was interested in hearing more a…

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    - Flat road, no pedaling, at say 30 mph, how far do you suppose you might get? - How much do you weigh? Considerable variable between 8 and 12 stones. ;)- Would there be any advantage in filling the main frame triangle with a larger battery compartment, thereby providing for a lower center of gravity overall? Seems that the ideal would be to have a good fore and aft balance with a bit more over your traction wheel and a bit less on the steering, but as low to the ground as possible. Your layout seems to accomplish this pretty well, but I am curious about the overall stability at higher speed?Lastly, how's the braking performance? There's been plenty said and written about the pros and cons of rim vs. discs, especially regarding wider tired bikes, but I was interested in hearing more about what you use, how they perform, and what, if anything, that you might think could make them any better (if that is even worthy of concern). My own experience with mountain bike brakes has been that the hydraulic discs gave better wet performance, and with a heavier load, the tendency for disc early "grab" was mitigated, but that of course also adds considerable cost, and yada, yada, yada...Love your project, especially the opportunity for evaluating after having ridden it for so many miles. Also great that you're given the opportunity to teach. Middle school is particularly challenging, to say the least, but many of the teachers who influenced me the most were those that managed to get through to me at that age, which was no small task to be sure.

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  • Galt commented on Johnny Wikk's instructable A Cargo Fork
    A Cargo Fork

    Having toured with front and rear panniers, along with a rear cargo rack, I love the lower center of gravity that this would provide, but with a few caveats. First, the added weight on the steering geometry doesn't help in making evasive maneuvers (potholes, opening car doors, etc.) in the city, and on rougher terrain I'm sure it would be extremely wearing to ride for long. That said, for urban living short jaunts to the store, it sure beats walking or bringing home broken eggs in a backpack (been there too). Of course the ultimate stable load hauler would be a trike, but that would be death on a stick in most cities. Any thoughts on keeping the original front wheel diameter and switching out the rear for a smaller profile. Advantages more weight over your drive wheel without as seriously…

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    Having toured with front and rear panniers, along with a rear cargo rack, I love the lower center of gravity that this would provide, but with a few caveats. First, the added weight on the steering geometry doesn't help in making evasive maneuvers (potholes, opening car doors, etc.) in the city, and on rougher terrain I'm sure it would be extremely wearing to ride for long. That said, for urban living short jaunts to the store, it sure beats walking or bringing home broken eggs in a backpack (been there too). Of course the ultimate stable load hauler would be a trike, but that would be death on a stick in most cities. Any thoughts on keeping the original front wheel diameter and switching out the rear for a smaller profile. Advantages more weight over your drive wheel without as seriously effecting steering geometry, plus I would think you could make it even wider overall, as well as longer. Gearing would obviously have to be worked out, but I'm just spit-ballin', recalling how many times my girl and I used to have to walk home with groceries and would have killed for something like this.Great Instructable overall. Not picking nits, I just look at everything with an eye toward improving on others' ideas. Saves me lots of brain work when folks like yu do the heavy lifting. :)

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  • Galt commented on Stephen24au's instructable Corten Steel Wicking Beds
    Corten Steel Wicking Beds

    Interesting concept that I've seen friends use in Oz, with the stand-pipe reservoir & drain tile. I believe the steel used is similar (or the same) as the stuff they use for shipping containers. We are planning on cutting up a few and I was thinking of painting the cut out pieces with an epoxy or polyurea to add to its rust resist. The real trouble, as with wood that lies in contact with the soil, is right at ground level where it's likely to stay moist and accessible to the air. My only concern with the bottom staying real wet would be propagation of anaerobic organisms since plant roots like good oxygen exchange and mainly aerobic organisms. I've also seen a similar execution of the irrigation system incorporated into Hugelkultur beds in permaculture. Another approach, if and where …

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    Interesting concept that I've seen friends use in Oz, with the stand-pipe reservoir & drain tile. I believe the steel used is similar (or the same) as the stuff they use for shipping containers. We are planning on cutting up a few and I was thinking of painting the cut out pieces with an epoxy or polyurea to add to its rust resist. The real trouble, as with wood that lies in contact with the soil, is right at ground level where it's likely to stay moist and accessible to the air. My only concern with the bottom staying real wet would be propagation of anaerobic organisms since plant roots like good oxygen exchange and mainly aerobic organisms. I've also seen a similar execution of the irrigation system incorporated into Hugelkultur beds in permaculture. Another approach, if and where an affordable and appropriate steel may not be available or viable, would be maybe reinforced lightweight concrete, I've seen some pretty cool -ables on making l/w concrete raised bed panels that were pretty thin (like maybe 3-1/2") and had cast in interlocking corner overlaps that allow them to be pinned together using pieces of 1/2" or 10 mm coated rebar. With some buttressing to stabilize them, raised beds are real nice for old farts like me if you lay a piece of weather proofed 2"x6" or 8" across the tops as a seat to work from. Very nice for vegetable gardening, especially if ya don't get up and down so good. And finally, we do something similar, but route what's called "leaky hose" irrigation in the substrate. It's the rough porous rubber hose that's made out of recycled tires. We hook it up to a manifold and run the hose through the end of the bed to daylight and on a slight slope, then cap the end with a screw on fitting so that it can all be drained down and left in place to over-winter. The hose is on a timer with a filter & pressure reducer, all controlled by a cheap garden hose timer. Also use buried PEX to feed the beds so that the sun doesn't super heat the hose water. At season's end the junctions, which are set in vaults that allow access without digging, get compressed air blown through them once disconnected at the both ends, kinda similar to the way a lot of underground lawn irrigation systems work.Nicely done and well presented.

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  • Galt commented on Natalina's instructable Build a Soundproof Wall
    Build a Soundproof Wall

    So, remodeling is driven typically, as you illustrated, by what is easiest for the contractor, not what provides the most consistently great outcome. Drywall having tapered long edges and square end edges means that any joint where you can arrange two tapered edges together will also create a perfect (as designed and intended by the board manufacturers) depression for your spackle and tape so that the finished joint is perfectly flush with the adjoining surfaces. In a small room, the easier-for-contractor horizontal method, which results in a lot of square butt joints with no taper, is not too horrible, but on any long wall or ceiling, it's going to result in 4' vertical joints that are impossible to hide. Cover that with semi-gloss paint and it gets even worse, but it makes perfect sense…

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    So, remodeling is driven typically, as you illustrated, by what is easiest for the contractor, not what provides the most consistently great outcome. Drywall having tapered long edges and square end edges means that any joint where you can arrange two tapered edges together will also create a perfect (as designed and intended by the board manufacturers) depression for your spackle and tape so that the finished joint is perfectly flush with the adjoining surfaces. In a small room, the easier-for-contractor horizontal method, which results in a lot of square butt joints with no taper, is not too horrible, but on any long wall or ceiling, it's going to result in 4' vertical joints that are impossible to hide. Cover that with semi-gloss paint and it gets even worse, but it makes perfect sense if you think about it, since all of the attending spackle and tape is forced to sit on top of two already flush surfaces that are in the same plane.Visit a commercial office space being finished and you'll never ever see drywall being installed on the horizontal bias, always vertical, and this issue of using the product as it was design is the reason why. That and the fact that commercial customers are typically paying much higher prices for their interior improvements, so they expect spectacular results. Home remodeling, and even many home building methodologies, have nothing at all to do with producing the best quality finished product, it's all about what is fastest and cheapest. A skilled finisher can feather a butt joint to help blend it in, but you can't change the simple physical reality of the walls ending up with bulging seams at each of those points.There is one exception to that situation, and it involves the use of a pre-formed backing board that is designed to support the two edges of a butt joint and create a depression that will help it disappear. In order for the pre-formed helper board to work, the butt joint must fall near the middle of the cell BETWEEN two studs. I'm including a couple of links to help better understand this with a visual. Pay special attention to the video section where the presenter lays a 4' level across the finished butt joint at a tangent and you'll clearly see that the joint is approaching perfectly flat and in plane with the surrounding surfaces as successive coats of spackle are applied. Had this been done with the method offerred by your comment, the same would not be true since all of the tape and mud would begin on top of that flat plane and just build out from there. Trim-Tex is the only company that I know who makes these, but you can also make your own simply enough out of strips of 7/16" OSB if you only need a couple, have a hard time finding them, or run out. Trim-Tex also makes a wide range of very cool products (like moldings and special reveals) that can help you realize your creative bliss by making seemingly difficult looks much simpler for the relative novice to attain. (no, I don't work for them, we just used to use a lot of their products)https://www.trim-tex.com/products/overview/tools-a...I'm retired now, but back in the day one of the companies that I owned employed over 240 craftspeople, including many plasterers (who make your average mud slinger look pretty amateurish when it comes to gauging a wall or fixing bad remodel joint). Our business was some high-end residential, but mostly Class 'A' commercial interiors, for some of the biggest banks, law and accounting firms on the east coast. Our client walk-throughs were typically conducted with several client representatives (most usually the biggest shots who were going to occupy the spaces) and there were no allowances for "good enough", they expected, and received, perfection. That means 100' long hallways, coated with high gloss finishes that telegraph so much as a sand speck, had to be razor sharp and perfectly flat. Horizontally laid sheets (even using 16' long drywall) with butt joints would never pass muster. The worst thing about hiring people to come in to work on your home is that they almost universally work to a standard of "good enough", mainly because none of their customers either know enough to demand high quality and a properly executed job, or are too easily convinced to accept piss poor results after the fact. Our commercial clients always included project managers and architects, who knew what a proper, high quality job looked like, and their job was to make certain that their bosses or clients got it. With home improvement and even most new home builders, it's all about fast and cheap because they are much more significantly impacted by massive competition and downward pressure on their pricing. Economically it makes perfect sense when you consider that, at the time, our drywall mechanics and finishers were making nearly twice what the new home and remodeling sector was paying. Of course probably half or more of the people hustling home improvements are also unlicensed and uninsured, so caveat emptor, but I digress.To readers; it's your home, so take your time and work for perfection, 'cuz not only are you going to have to look at it for a very long time, but it's a whole lot easier to do it right the first time than it is to have to tear it out and do it again later. If you hire someone to do something, educate yourself to the processes involved and watch them like a hawk. Make sure that they are licensed and insured, and speak to former clients who had similar work done. Also contact your appropriate authority to see what if any violations, citations, or complaints that they may have had lodged against them in the past, as well as their outcomes. There are more bad contractors out there than good, but even the better ones are likely to try and get away with doing as little as possible to get paid, so the more ya know, the better you'll be able to supervise your project.For DIY'ers, obviously, Instructables rock, but anything that you can't learn here you can now find on Youtube, but I also prefer starting with the manufacturer's sites. Most of them aren't bashful about sharing information on how their products were intended to be installed and used.

    Used to own and run a large commercial interiors business back in the day, and we built out everything from high-end custom homes with safe rooms and wine cellars, to recording and broadcast studios, audiology centers and labs, so been there done that. The sound transmission control effectiveness of your completed wall is only limited by your pocketbook and space. The particulars of assembling the pieces isn't really all that tough.Understanding more about the cause and effect, as well as how sound transmission effectiveness is measured, will make planning a whole lot simpler once understood, and this Instructable offers a great primer, but here's some more.This is another technique that can be added to some of the others in crafting a high-performance wall system or used by itself over a…

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    Used to own and run a large commercial interiors business back in the day, and we built out everything from high-end custom homes with safe rooms and wine cellars, to recording and broadcast studios, audiology centers and labs, so been there done that. The sound transmission control effectiveness of your completed wall is only limited by your pocketbook and space. The particulars of assembling the pieces isn't really all that tough.Understanding more about the cause and effect, as well as how sound transmission effectiveness is measured, will make planning a whole lot simpler once understood, and this Instructable offers a great primer, but here's some more.This is another technique that can be added to some of the others in crafting a high-performance wall system or used by itself over an existing wall or ceiling.https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing...Actually, the Soundproofing Company (above) has a pretty good website as far as explaining things like STC, as well as having some very helpful products, like the Green Glue and something called Mass Loaded Vinyl (MLV).And here's a short explanation of the three main types of soundproofing matrices (including a redux on STC). http://www.acoustiguard.com/blog/414-stc-nrc-and-i...This site has an interesting audio demo to help tout its product.https://askforpurple.com/tips-tools/soundbreak-xp-...There are a host of specialty products (including more from Green Glue) that can assist toward the desired end, and here are but a few:We also did some work for NSA and several other high-security gov't applications. If one of your goals is to make certain that someone on one side of the wall can't hear what you're saying, you can also add double airlock entryways (similar to the access control points that are designed into prisons) along with off-set solid core doors fitted with special sweeps and compressible weatherstrippings. Whether single or staggered double walls, there are also sound isolating silicone gaskets that can be fitted along the wall's baseplate to isolate transmissions between the walls and floor. Fabric finished objects and other assorted upholstery can be added with sound deadening ceiling tiles to create a more acoustically "dead" room where sound waves go to die because there's almost nothing for them to bounce off of. And finally, white noise generators can be installed on or adjacent the door to help mask conversations inside the room with a low volume radio static-type constant noise between the conversation source and someone outside who might be listening. Of course, today, however, chances are that the bird outside your window is an eavesdropping drone using your Smart TV and webcam to record you in audio and video, so there's no end to that rabbit hole. ;)https://www.greengluecompany.com/products/noisepro...https://acousticalsolutions.com/product/resilient-...https://www.soundaway.com/soundproofing-isolation-clips-s/32.htmhttps://www.quietrock.com/productshttps://www.blueridgefiberboard.com/soundstop-maximize-sound-deadening/https://www.certainteed.com/drywall/products/silentfx-quickcut-drywall/https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DB0QP8G/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&imprToken=kieRtmDfDQMR9YTHU-RO1A&slotNum=2&linkCode=sl1&tag=aquietrefuge-20&linkId=8f27a11d0cb46ecc9c6dfe6e806b3508&language=en_UShttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TP7C9YY/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&imprToken=kieRtmDfDQMR9YTHU-RO1A&slotNum=1&linkCode=sl1&tag=aquietrefuge-20&linkId=556371472cd7afb4f2bdd45d32f01199&language=en_UShttps://www.amazon.com/Auralex-Acoustics-SonoFlat-Absorption-14-Panels/dp/B001E876YK/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&imprToken=kieRtmDfDQMR9YTHU-RO1A&slotNum=3&th=1&linkCode=sl1&tag=aquietrefuge-20&linkId=9b3e5405f9ec6c344b899d4f65fb1044&language=en_UShttps://www.armstrongceilings.com/residential/en-us/project-ideas-and-installation/acoustical-panels.htmlhttps://www.homedepot.com/p/Ceilume-Soniguard-24-in-x-24-in-Drop-Ceiling-Acoustic-Thermal-Insulation-Case-of-24-SONIGRD-CASE/204260961http://www.carpetcycle.com/quiet-tech/https://www.soundproofingtips.com/soundproof-curtains/https://www.amazon.com/Soundproof-Weather-Stripping-Door-Weatherstrips/dp/B0742H2XBR?SubscriptionId=AKIAJ5D3JAXJBKMXQPHQ&tag=sndprf-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B0742H2XBRhttps://www.amazon.com/Roberts-70-193A-Engineered-Laminate-Underlayment/dp/B008N6Q7HI?psc=1&SubscriptionId=AKIAJ5D3JAXJBKMXQPHQ&tag=sndprf-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B008N6Q7HIhttps://www.amazon.com/Acousti-Coat-Sound-Deadening-Gallon/dp/B01AC3YJEM?psc=1&SubscriptionId=AKIAJ5D3JAXJBKMXQPHQ&tag=sndprf-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B01AC3YJEM

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      • Granola
      • Quickly Grow Your Facebook Page
      • Roasted Brussel Sprouts With Garlic and Bacon
  • Galt followed tomatoskins
      • Captive Ring Puzzle
      • Perfect Workbench
      • How to Make 3 Simple Hardware Store Puzzles
  • Galt commented on tonyhill's instructable You Too Can Make an Anvil

    Awesome project, and an excellent Instructable. This one's a definite keeper! Thank you, thank you, thank you.

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  • Galt followed tonyhill
      • You Too Can Make an Anvil
  • For those not inclined to read, here's a documentary that was made on the subject. The story of how the victims in Huntington, West Virginia chose to dedicate their settlement monies to helping expose the even broader impact of this travesty is a story worthy of national hero status IMO. Just ordinary folk, intentionally victimized by DuPont purely to squeeze just one more day's profits from their poisoning, and these people did something extraordinary. But yeah, stay away from anything having to do with those compounds, or their latest convoluted replacements. They are unfortunately ubiquitous in our modern world, but we all need to start walking that back regardless. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84glf6F3b-Y&fbclid=IwAR2sA6AJXbspZUpr4o8DxRmUosDlcgghaQhM1S-fVN9Ecw1gAiwWadIHkak

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  • Great first Instructable, just a few words on Teflon and PTFE's. The short of it is that PTFE's will likely be shown to be one of the greatest polluting compounds on the planet, even worse than the pesticides that now span the globe and infiltrate all of our food. Read it and weep: https://theintercept.com/2015/08/11/dupont-chemistry-deception/?fbclid=IwAR3nuWLnf4P7CueUjIOUfKHQ406DSQr2AZK9yDc4m8SGu7Jg7rpXLKIgjMg They've also come out with a replacement compound called Gen X that's looking like it will prove just as dangerous and destructive, but ya know, there are profits projections to hit, so it's all good, unless you're in the Netherlands or around Cape Fear, where they're making this new garbage. Meanwhile DuPont gets absorbed and redistributed in order to isolate all of its envir…

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    Great first Instructable, just a few words on Teflon and PTFE's. The short of it is that PTFE's will likely be shown to be one of the greatest polluting compounds on the planet, even worse than the pesticides that now span the globe and infiltrate all of our food. Read it and weep: https://theintercept.com/2015/08/11/dupont-chemistry-deception/?fbclid=IwAR3nuWLnf4P7CueUjIOUfKHQ406DSQr2AZK9yDc4m8SGu7Jg7rpXLKIgjMg They've also come out with a replacement compound called Gen X that's looking like it will prove just as dangerous and destructive, but ya know, there are profits projections to hit, so it's all good, unless you're in the Netherlands or around Cape Fear, where they're making this new garbage. Meanwhile DuPont gets absorbed and redistributed in order to isolate all of its environmental lawsuit potential into one shell that carries few assets, assuring that the resultant lawsuits end at a dry well. Just watch the Monsanto/Bayer maeuvers for a parallel preview of the next step. Not meaning to go political, but this junk is not the benign material that we've been cooking on and told it was for half a century.

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  • Galt followed DIY KING 00
      • DIY Brushless Dremel Tool
      • DIY Brushless Gimbal
      • DIY Rustic Cutlery Holder
      • Biochemists Way of Baking Bread - Snuggle Up to Yeast
      • Building a Life-Size Nutcracker (that Can Crack Coconuts!)
      • Power Carved Giant "Boot Print" Wood Wall Art Panel
      • Pallet Wood Penny Boards
  • Don't get me started on the awesome utility of a band saw, especially in a one saw shop, but I was directing the re-saw comment toward people that might already own one. ;) She could of course do the same thing with with a thin kerf table saw blade for the saw that she already has, but obviously even the thinnest table saw solution would still turn more wood into sawdust than the band saw.Long time fan of HW myself. Found a crepe drum cleaner there for my 37x2 SuperMax that has been a real blessing in extending abrasive life. Beats the heck out of what I used to do (one of those scenes more commonly found under the heading "Don't try this at home"). Also nice that they stock a lot of the more unusual Festool fiddly bits.

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  • So first of all, let me congratulate you on a wonderful job, and you get a thundering "Atta Girl!" for jumping into such a complicated project even though it was somewhat outside of your comfort zone. Also wanted to say that I love your design. Sometimes no better way of learning than just doin' it. :) Couple of ideas and suggestions for your next one, or for anyone interested in trying their hand. If you poke around in any coastal town, or on-line, you can find marine grade plywood with face veneers of bamboo, fir, birch, okoume, sapele, mahoganey, meranti, teak, and others. It's expensive, but generally very lightweight, strong, and more importantly, is put together using the right kind of glue to make it last in an outdoor environment. Lauan, usually not so much, mainly becau…

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    So first of all, let me congratulate you on a wonderful job, and you get a thundering "Atta Girl!" for jumping into such a complicated project even though it was somewhat outside of your comfort zone. Also wanted to say that I love your design. Sometimes no better way of learning than just doin' it. :) Couple of ideas and suggestions for your next one, or for anyone interested in trying their hand. If you poke around in any coastal town, or on-line, you can find marine grade plywood with face veneers of bamboo, fir, birch, okoume, sapele, mahoganey, meranti, teak, and others. It's expensive, but generally very lightweight, strong, and more importantly, is put together using the right kind of glue to make it last in an outdoor environment. Lauan, usually not so much, mainly because what you see at the home centers does not use a waterproof glue. You can test the tenacity plywood glue by dropping a small piece in boiling water if you want to find out how yours might hold up if and when water does find a way into it. Home center lauan will disintegrate, whereas the marine grade stuff will not. Someone previously recommended being OCD about sealing the edges and every side and screw hole, and I couldn't agree more, regardless of the type of wood that you choose. Not only does it protect the wood from the weather, but it also prevents it from absorbing and releasing moisture unevenly. An unfinished interior face or edge will still be able to absorb water vapor, say from the sweaty humans sleeping within, or just from the ambient conditions themselves, and if those conditions are extreme enough, like say up in the rain forests of the great northwest, the accumulating moisture can cause problems with the finish on the opposite side of the wood.While the marine grades of plywood will have clear grained veneers to give you a beautiful finish, they are also sometimes available in oversized dimensions, such as 5' widths and 10 or 12' lengths, helping to minimize or eliminate your number of seams. Another build method that you can employ is that of wood stripping, and then covering with fiberglass. It may seem intimidating, but there are lots of good books and tutorials out there that can guide you through, and the finished product will not only be incredibly strong, but weather-proof as well. Basically a ribbed form is constructed and wood strips are laid across the form and either pinned or temporarily hot glued to the form while having their long edges formed and glued to the previously laid strip. The edge shaping can be a simple bevel or squared edge formed with a hand plane, or a kind of fitted cove and bead shape can be made using something like the trim router. This is a beautiful method that is more common to canoes and kayak construction, but I've always thought it would make for an interesting camper build. If you have a band saw and an appropriate local wood species available for re-sawing, you could make your own strips, mix species and colors, and end up with something even more unique, as well as being less expensive (other than the fiber-glassing supplies of course). Ready made strips are usually about 1/4"-5/16" thick and 5/8"-1" wide, and in red or yellow cedar vary from $.45 to $.60 a linear foot. That can amount to about $300 for the same equivalent area of coverage afforded by a 4'x8' sheet of plywood. Re-sawing an 8' length of 1"x12" that you pay $8 per board foot for (a bd. ft. is 1"x12"x12") will yield about 128 strips of lightly dressed 3/4" wide x 5/16" thick 8' strips out of that $64 eight foot board, and laid up side by side that will provide the rough equivalent of (2) sheets of 4'x8' plywood for the cost of the board plus maybe $30 for the re-saw blade. Of course it makes for a seriously boring turn on the band saw, but you're essentially trade your time for the savings in money. Here's a beautiful strip canoe that was built by another Instructable contributor if you're not familiar with the process.https://www.instructables.com/Building-A-Cedar-...Link to a nice thin kerf re-saw blade:https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/wood-slicer-re...Here's what sapele plywood looks like btw:And lastly, if ya really wanna treat yourself to some nice hand held power tools, check out Festool sometime. Every wood worker deserves at least one. ;)

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  • Always love your projects. Here's a few pics of some other builds that I take inspiration from. S/S reducing fittings also work well with the draw bolt dimpling concept to give a nice well for soldering. Also the sanitary cloverleaf fitting attachment allows either a column or a pot still config using the same boiler components.

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  • Very cool. Great inspiration. Thanks for the sources as well.

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  • Galt commented on makjosher's instructable Rocket Boat

    Like I said - just mental floss to add to your already creative view. Quite the engineering challenge all told, especially since I can't imagine the thrust delivery from the Estes engines is all that steady. Used to launch and lose them all the time as a kid. Nothing full scale really equates due to the obscene ratio of thrust to size and weight that you're dealing with, other than maybe an air-to-air missile. Reminds me of the urban legend/Darwin Award about the guy who strapped a surplus jet engine to the roof of his station wagon out in the desert. Supposedly nothing found of him except the rubber from him standing on the brakes just before the car left the road and went airborne, ultimately becoming a black greasy spot on the side of some butte. :)

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  • Galt commented on makjosher's instructable Rocket Boat

    Awesome job on your "ible". I build kayaks, so probably none of what I know is of any value to you, but here's some random thoughts for mental floss anyway. Looking at the Navy hydrofoil it occurred to me that as already said the forward position of thrust would aid stability, but how about adjusting weights? Maybe the added weight would help maintain directional stability by limiting the effect that every little ripple or puff of wind might have. Also the added weight might make it simpler to try and balance using actual foils to raise the entire craft out of the water while still keeping the underwater wings submerged? Also kept thinking about the manta ray looking device that they sell to affix to the lower unit of outboards to help acceleration attitude from a rear propulsio…

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    Awesome job on your "ible". I build kayaks, so probably none of what I know is of any value to you, but here's some random thoughts for mental floss anyway. Looking at the Navy hydrofoil it occurred to me that as already said the forward position of thrust would aid stability, but how about adjusting weights? Maybe the added weight would help maintain directional stability by limiting the effect that every little ripple or puff of wind might have. Also the added weight might make it simpler to try and balance using actual foils to raise the entire craft out of the water while still keeping the underwater wings submerged? Also kept thinking about the manta ray looking device that they sell to affix to the lower unit of outboards to help acceleration attitude from a rear propulsion approach. That wing looks a lot like the foils of the hydrofoil. Just noodlin'. We have a nearby mill pond where people race RC nitro-methane boats. Might have to build one of these just to blow their minds one day. :)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrofoil

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  • Keep a couple of Kunekune pigs (friendliest, easiest keeping, greatest grazing and tasting pig out there) and let them self harvest the beets. Maybe plant some lopes, watermelon and pumpkins with them That way your somewhat limited food source is converted into tasty, tasty bacon, and your pigs feed themselves for a good portion of the year. You can lock the pigs in the cellar at the night for safe keeping - they're generally cleaner than most people, but a barn or hut works too. Kunekunes also stay small and marble like Kobe beef, so you won't find a more succulent pigOther than rats and roaches, spirulina algae is also a tremendous super food for the post apocalypse. All of the essential amino acids and protein you could want. Just be sure to start with a pure strain (Univ. of Texas or…

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    Keep a couple of Kunekune pigs (friendliest, easiest keeping, greatest grazing and tasting pig out there) and let them self harvest the beets. Maybe plant some lopes, watermelon and pumpkins with them That way your somewhat limited food source is converted into tasty, tasty bacon, and your pigs feed themselves for a good portion of the year. You can lock the pigs in the cellar at the night for safe keeping - they're generally cleaner than most people, but a barn or hut works too. Kunekunes also stay small and marble like Kobe beef, so you won't find a more succulent pigOther than rats and roaches, spirulina algae is also a tremendous super food for the post apocalypse. All of the essential amino acids and protein you could want. Just be sure to start with a pure strain (Univ. of Texas or Texas Tech I believe has a repository) and it can actually be fed by growing it in waste water used to scrub combustion gases. It is the only algae that will survive at the high pH that it requires (over 8 something I believe) so as long as the pH doesn't drop you are assured of having a pure sample. Important because some of the blue/green algae that grows at the lower pH is toxic. Spirulina can be eaten fresh and slimy, or dried and mixed with other bulkier foods for a more complete nutritional profile.Lastly, rabbits are tough to beat for space efficient animal protein that can be safeguarded from zombies while still replacing itself at a high rate even in captivity - plus they're pretty portable if ya have to run. If you're going to stay and fight, try growing a composite "fedge-row" of copiced bush willow on the inner perimeter, woven into a kind of espalier lattice of edible forage for pigs and bunnies. Then add an outer perimeter of copiced and laid down Orange Osage hedge beyond that. The willow is 14-15% protein and great roughage for the bunnies, and for the pigs (just gotta watch the calcium) and the limbs are great for all kinds of survival/homesteading projects - plus it's natural aspirin. Orange Osage hedge is said to grow "horse-high, bull-strong and pig-tight". Its thorns will likely further shred any interloping zombies and its fruit, the "hedge apple", actually looks like a brain - so it may also work as a distraction to the invading hoard. Orange Osage also makes a fantastic firewood, great rot proof fence posts, tool handles and war clubs, and bows made from its limbs are said to be as good or better than those of the English Yew. So aside from providing zombie protection and distraction, animal fodder and medicine, your "Fedge" could also supply you with great fuel for the fire to roast your pig or spit your rabbit while you sit back and pick off distracted zombies with your osage bow and willow arrows. Add a few mulberry to the hedge (also good firewood and fodder) 'cuz bees love the blossoms of all three, so you'll have some tasty mulberry mead to wash it all down with. Maybe save the beet hooch to fuel the Mad Max-mobile with the algae eating exhaust scrubber (to make you harder to track). Call it sustainable zombie survival symbiosis. Just 'cuz we're fighting zombies in the post apocalypse to stay alive doesn't mean we can't enjoy a good nosh and a flagon 'round the fire. ;)

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  • Same idea, but over charcoal you get a little char on the leaves and some caramelizing of the corn sugar. Awesome!And then, 'cuz ya can't have too much delicious, get some butter from grass fed cows, preferably a nice Guernsey or Jersey. The grass feeding allows the cow to uptake a lot of carotene, which ends up in the milk making it a dull yellow color. The higher milk fat and carotene content makes a higher fat content butter that is such a bright yellow it looks fake, but the mouth feel and taste is beyond belief. Also nice with a little corriander and/or some fine powdered chili pepper roasted in. Slip the leaf back, sprinkle and straighten them back out, then cook.

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  • Simply awesome. The only way to make it any better would be if you could have sparks fly each time it was repositioned. :)

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  • Galt commented on seamster's instructable Restore a rusty toolbox

    Little disappointed that you didn't lay down a couple dozen coats of hand rubbed lacquer and clear. Seriously though, waaaay too pretty for bangin' with tools. My only question is where the hell are the cast alloy Shelby mags? :) Beautiful job! You should be doing commercials for Rust-oleum. Wait... I think you just did - might wanna send 'em a link. ;) Reuse, re-purpose, recycle and wear out. Way to go!

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  • Charcoal as a soil amendment also has particularly interesting characteristics. It functions as a giant sponge for soil microbes to inhabit, as well as holding moisture and nutrients that would otherwise drain away or evaporate. Care must be taken to first "inoculate" the charcoal with some sort of nutrient to keep it from sucking up what's already present in the soil that it's added to. It's popularity as a soil amendment also brings with it a new name: "Biochar", but it's still just charcoal, or carbon. The inoculation process that we use when the charcoal is destined for use in the soil is to allow our animals to urinate on it, since urine=urea=nitrogen. Not quite that simple but close.Using charcoal in this fashion also works as a deodorizer. The smells that we as…

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    Charcoal as a soil amendment also has particularly interesting characteristics. It functions as a giant sponge for soil microbes to inhabit, as well as holding moisture and nutrients that would otherwise drain away or evaporate. Care must be taken to first "inoculate" the charcoal with some sort of nutrient to keep it from sucking up what's already present in the soil that it's added to. It's popularity as a soil amendment also brings with it a new name: "Biochar", but it's still just charcoal, or carbon. The inoculation process that we use when the charcoal is destined for use in the soil is to allow our animals to urinate on it, since urine=urea=nitrogen. Not quite that simple but close.Using charcoal in this fashion also works as a deodorizer. The smells that we associate with livestock is a variety of volatile compounds being evaporated into the atmosphere, as anyone familiar with the old cow fart/methane stories is aware. By adding charcoal to animal feed and/or spreading in areas where animals eliminate wastes these evaporating compounds can be captured and harvested for later use while improving the olfactory experience for people in the surrounding area. More importantly all of these evaporating molecules don't just disappear. Sooner or later they latch onto larger molecules and come back to earth in solution when it rains, much the same way that unfiltered coal burning brought us acid rain.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_pretaCharcoal is also used as a filter, particularly for capturing gases and purifying water. We use an ozone generator to burn off organic impurities in an aquaculture project and since excess ozone that is not consumed in the process is bad stuff any excess is passed through a carbon bed where it is absorbed. For Preppers & Survivalists making charcoal allows them to make sand filtered drinking water more palatable, but you'll also see that carbon is an integral part of nearly all commercial water filtration schemes.The process by which this all occurs is known as pyrolis, which is basically the fractional distillation of an organic substance in a low or no oxygen environment. At various temperatures during this process where wood is use different substances will off-gas, methane or wood gas being one. By capturing that gas and recirculating it to add to the combustion process you can accelerate everything. This is what a lot of the high efficiency wood stoves do with their burning of flue gases. Fractional distillation, or cracking (not to be confused with "fracking") is how the various hyrdo-carbon compounds are extracted and separated in the oil and gas industry.There is great debate over the carbon neutrality of this process since there are a variety of by-products formed when various types of wood are "cracked", methanol for example is just one, along with the methane already mentioned. In many developing nations charcoal is made by partially burning whole swaths of forest and then covering the fire with dirt to smother the flames and create the low oxygen environment. This is not a particularly exact or controlled process and as such results in a tremendous amount of heavy smoke and local air pollution. Indonesia not too long ago experienced very serious problems as a result of this, but such is the impact of globalization. We desire a cleaner environment so we ship our polluting industry overseas; out of sight, out of mind. Most of the commercial Third World charcoal is being made from coconut husks, but it is also made from coal. Seems like a simple item but there's lots of interesting aspects to it.Lastly there are plenty of larger DIY scalings of this concept using everything from crimp on lid 5 gallon metal buckets to 30 and 55 gallon steel drums. A quick YouTube search will find everything from big double retort bio-gas reactors to backyard Biochar batch plants using 55 gallon drums. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqkWYM7rYpU

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