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Gary Viveiros

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  • There is, however, the consideration of rust prevention, and I would still recommend using few drops oil like automatic transmission oil which parents usually have around since that last bout with the leaking transmission hose, until it got repaired. Even if they don't, dad I'm sure would let a few drops go from the dipstick for his kid. This oil is very light and still offers protection against rust from sweat (especially in a pants pocket), or careless handling, splashing beverages, or that light, passing rain.

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  • Use the established standard test for fit and effectiveness of a gas mask - open a packet of saccharin and poof it into the air. If you taste it with the mask on, then either the mask isn't sealing properly, or isn't fitting properly.

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  • Aqueous-based crystals come with a big set of headaches. In Hawaii we have too much experience with highly ionic aqueous-grown crystals (called salt) from the ocean mists around the coastal areas - going inland about a quarter to half-mile inland. They ruin electronics and rust-out appliances and auto bodies. In industrial settings, any conductive traces have to be sprayed with a silicone lacquer, or coated with a conformal coating to prevent etching the traces by the presence of a corrosive salt crystal which absorbs water. Epsom 'salts' are no better. I'd try casting acrylic 'crystals' and experiment with positioning them for best lighting effect, or crack a piece of 'safety glass' bought from an auto junkyard and using clear epoxy or resin to join small pieces into small clumps as…

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    Aqueous-based crystals come with a big set of headaches. In Hawaii we have too much experience with highly ionic aqueous-grown crystals (called salt) from the ocean mists around the coastal areas - going inland about a quarter to half-mile inland. They ruin electronics and rust-out appliances and auto bodies. In industrial settings, any conductive traces have to be sprayed with a silicone lacquer, or coated with a conformal coating to prevent etching the traces by the presence of a corrosive salt crystal which absorbs water. Epsom 'salts' are no better. I'd try casting acrylic 'crystals' and experiment with positioning them for best lighting effect, or crack a piece of 'safety glass' bought from an auto junkyard and using clear epoxy or resin to join small pieces into small clumps as the basis of crystal-looking groups (then coating them to prevent sharp edges).

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  • Dave!, Dave! Stop, what with the $10- words! You're bankrupting my time budget having to look them up. Even if I were to object to the selection of that word, I'd risk being labeled, 'opprobrious'.

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  • Whatever they call them the physics are the same - the componentry gets stressed by over-voltage spikes and heat generation. The enclosed plastic is necessary for safety, but without adequate heatsinking (electrically isolated) the life of the leds goes down dramatically as you've experienced. Neither are all electrolytics the same. You can find higher temperature types when you look at catalogs like Digi-Key. Without driver circuitry like the more expensive ones, the lifetime is also lowered. We all know you get what you pay for, so only as a source of something fun to play with it's OK I guess.

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