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I can build pretty much anything I set my mind to building.

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  • Invention1's instructable Bedbug Control's weekly stats:
    • Bedbug Control
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  • Custom Made Wide-Toe Boots Built on a Casting

    I have tried stitching the soles and it fails. The bottom of the thread is subject to damage from abrasion. The old-school method of nailing on the soles deals with the problem that when the sole bends, the midsole puts sideways pull on the glue joint. The nails handle these forces by giving a little, then the glue joint doesn't fail.

    Check my other instructable about making shoes, they are a bit simpler, but made on the same principles.

    Feet getting wider as we age was a completely normal and usual process, until we decided to clamp them into leather coffins. Studies of native, shoeless populations show that their feet get wider and wider, and since they aren't constricted by shoes, usually by lightweight sandals, wide feet don't result in bunions. There are a number of small commercial brands that actually make shoes and boots wider in the toe, and that was my fallback if these boots didn't work out. Dr. McLanahan, at Northwest Foot and Ankle, links to some of them on his site which is linked in the instructable. Loose heels is not uncommon, and these are typically nailed on with clinch nails. The nails are long enough to go all the way through the heel, then are clinched on the inside of the shoe by driving them a…

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    Feet getting wider as we age was a completely normal and usual process, until we decided to clamp them into leather coffins. Studies of native, shoeless populations show that their feet get wider and wider, and since they aren't constricted by shoes, usually by lightweight sandals, wide feet don't result in bunions. There are a number of small commercial brands that actually make shoes and boots wider in the toe, and that was my fallback if these boots didn't work out. Dr. McLanahan, at Northwest Foot and Ankle, links to some of them on his site which is linked in the instructable. Loose heels is not uncommon, and these are typically nailed on with clinch nails. The nails are long enough to go all the way through the heel, then are clinched on the inside of the shoe by driving them against a metal plate. Put them around the edges of the heel, you never want something sharp right under your foot. An insole is usually planty of thickness to prevent any problems with the nail irritating your foot.

    Why thank you!

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  • Invention1 made the instructable Duluth Pack
    Duluth Pack

    Made one with some cheap ripstop nylon from the fabric store. This is a great project to get used to MYOG, and to try out the capabilities of your sewing machine for thicker material. My total weight was 335 grams, and volume was 80 liters, a monster of a pack and not much weight, but I wouldn't want to carry it very far.

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    • Teardrop Trailer With Off-grid Solar
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      1 comments
  • Uh Oh. NEVER put a relay on a shield. NEVER EVER. Why? 40 years of electronics experience and many puzzling problems with prototypes has taught me this. Relays generate magnetic fields and electromagnetic noise. Close to a microcontroller, these signals can play havoc, causing it to execute random instructions, jump to random places in the code, erase memory, and God only knows what else. They'll work fine for a while then they will mess up. Believe me I have made this mistake over and over always with disastrous results. Get that relay off the proto shield, or suffer the consequences. I've gone so far as to add steel shielding between the Arduino and the coil, which worked, but distance is your friend here - much better to put the relay on a board 20 centimeters away. ("I b…

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    Uh Oh. NEVER put a relay on a shield. NEVER EVER. Why? 40 years of electronics experience and many puzzling problems with prototypes has taught me this. Relays generate magnetic fields and electromagnetic noise. Close to a microcontroller, these signals can play havoc, causing it to execute random instructions, jump to random places in the code, erase memory, and God only knows what else. They'll work fine for a while then they will mess up. Believe me I have made this mistake over and over always with disastrous results. Get that relay off the proto shield, or suffer the consequences. I've gone so far as to add steel shielding between the Arduino and the coil, which worked, but distance is your friend here - much better to put the relay on a board 20 centimeters away. ("I built it that way, and what you say didn't happen to me!" No? Not YET!)

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  • Invention1 commented on FuzzyO's instructable Geodesic Dome

    You hinted that you dug into the mathematics behind dome calculations. Do you have a reference for that? I would hope that a person who wasn't afraid of a little math and CAD could use the math behind these domes to figure out those elliptical domes.

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    • Wide-toe leather shoes built on a casting
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      5 comments
  • I was able to embed the video in the instructable step 8 - maybe that will work. Checked that it is set to public and will load in an incognito window where I haven't identified myself. Sorry for the tech issues, I'm kinda out of my league. Give it another try maybe it will work this time. Meanwhile, I'm fixing to do another shoe build and will video more of the steps.

    Well, give it another try. It's set to Public, and I can load it in an incognito window without logging in to Instructables or Youtube, so it should be working. Sorry for the tech issues. Stay tuned, I'm fixing to make another set of shoes by the same method and will take some more video.

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  • Try the video link here: https://youtu.be/Xq1jzVZ3LeU

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  • MIG and/or TIG can be a very awesome welding system. MIG is a little cheaper welder, and thus more popular, there are things you can do with TIG that won't work with MIG. First time I tried a MIG, I sat down and signed my name in a piece of steel, I bought the used rig right then and there, probably my most expensive impulse buy ever. Never regretted it.

    **** Or anywhere else either! ***** Awesome hack, not too safe, no backup rope. I wouldn't do it without a belay. Impressive!

    I hate it when that happens!

    I've been involved in some rockclimbing, and also adapting rockclimbing equipment to building inspection/safety. Two things make me nervous about this. First, in ladder safety they insist three points of contact at all times. Only move one point of contact (hand/foot). In this case we're moving two attachment points. It would be safer if the hand and foot were independently switched. That way only move the hand, then switch the left foot and move it, then switch the right foot and move it, etc. Second, what about battery/electronics failure? Pretty much catastrophic. We do something similar in climbing with ropes and a gizmo called a jumar. It only takes two jumars to climb a rope, but there is always a third that simply attaches to the harness. I used such a rig just yesterday …

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    I've been involved in some rockclimbing, and also adapting rockclimbing equipment to building inspection/safety. Two things make me nervous about this. First, in ladder safety they insist three points of contact at all times. Only move one point of contact (hand/foot). In this case we're moving two attachment points. It would be safer if the hand and foot were independently switched. That way only move the hand, then switch the left foot and move it, then switch the right foot and move it, etc. Second, what about battery/electronics failure? Pretty much catastrophic. We do something similar in climbing with ropes and a gizmo called a jumar. It only takes two jumars to climb a rope, but there is always a third that simply attaches to the harness. I used such a rig just yesterday to climb a tree - the third attachment point was needed just to have a rest every once in a while. Many ladder systems on tall objects like power plant stacks have a rail in the middle where a simple ratcheting safety cam attaches. You can't fall even if you let go of both hands and your feet slip out, the cam on the third rail stops your fall. If one of the steel rails you are climbing is such a rail, (or both of them) then a mechanical safety could stop a catastrophic power failure. Nice hack guys!

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  • Invention1 followed arduino channel
  • I don't. This type of battery usually has a built-in battery management system (BMS) that may or may not have that function. High battery temperature is an important consideration, and limiting the current to the battery manufacturer's spec is the first way to avoid overheating. Most chargers for LiFEPO4 batteries do not have any kind of temperature input. Better BMS systems will have a battery temperature limiter of some kind, and automatically disconnect from the charger if they sense high temperature.

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  • Troubleshooting - if the feeder water glugs out, your tubing may be too large. I had to pinch my tubing nearly shut to make this stop leaking.

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