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J-Max

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Design Now: 3D Design Contest 2016
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3D Printing Contest 2016
Contest Winner Runner Up in the 3D Printing Contest 2016
  • G300 - 3D Printed CNC Machine

    309.78€ is for a 600x400ish travel area but you probably forget few things, like the Z transmission, the DIY boards, the cable carrier, the wiring... For a 1250x750mm as Dutch_Dude wants, the price would raise because if a component is suitable for a short travel, it can be terrible as travel grows. Remember Xcarve's 2040 X beams? In my humble opinion, 8mm stubs are not suitable for router machining so do the 9mm GT2 belt, except if the machine is dedicated to extremely soft materials milling. I had 12mm on a 200x300x80mm machine and that was still pitiful on hard woods. 8mm is already a bit too light for a 300g heatbed, it will probably flex too much while machining. The belt may stretch too much too, even PU white GT2 ones. This is maybe the Achiles' tendon of the machine, behind the pl…

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    309.78€ is for a 600x400ish travel area but you probably forget few things, like the Z transmission, the DIY boards, the cable carrier, the wiring... For a 1250x750mm as Dutch_Dude wants, the price would raise because if a component is suitable for a short travel, it can be terrible as travel grows. Remember Xcarve's 2040 X beams? In my humble opinion, 8mm stubs are not suitable for router machining so do the 9mm GT2 belt, except if the machine is dedicated to extremely soft materials milling. I had 12mm on a 200x300x80mm machine and that was still pitiful on hard woods. 8mm is already a bit too light for a 300g heatbed, it will probably flex too much while machining. The belt may stretch too much too, even PU white GT2 ones. This is maybe the Achiles' tendon of the machine, behind the plastic parts. May I suggest PLA may cause issues on long machining time, because the router and the motors may reach more than 40°C and will soften the PLA parts in contact ?

    Well, metal design is not expensive. That dimensions calls for a travelling gantry. To reduce cost, I would go to a simple design like below. Every part of the structure except the front and back 1/8" plates are from the same 2x4x1/8" steel beam section. The structure is probably under $50 or $75 if you choose a fancy stainless steel, you can't beat that with filament and aluminium profiles, but you get a much better structure. Then add the best guides, screw transmission and electronics you can afford.

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  • G300 - 3D Printed CNC Machine

    $300 is unrealistic for any CNC router of this size, I'm afraid. Even a MP CNC will cost you more than $500. Unless you're a reclaim genius.

    Dear Dutch_Dude, I'm afraid you did not get it. As said earlier, I welcome the quality of the work done. That's not the point. Of course, I'm not either comparing two machines of different prices, but I'm pointing out plastic parts, especially 3D printed are not stiff enough for structural parts of a CNC mill. Please compare young modulus of materials : ABS = 40Mpa ; Aluminium = 110Mpa ; Steel = 480Mpa. All has been said. Instead of plastics you want to use metal (preferably steel) which would cost you less, not more. Steel is 3 times cheaper than aluminium and 9 times cheaper than filament. QED.As an engineer, designing a machine is not a challenge to me. I don't want to play who's the smartest game. I just gave a kind advice on materials and had a nice talk with the author, as you can …

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    Dear Dutch_Dude, I'm afraid you did not get it. As said earlier, I welcome the quality of the work done. That's not the point. Of course, I'm not either comparing two machines of different prices, but I'm pointing out plastic parts, especially 3D printed are not stiff enough for structural parts of a CNC mill. Please compare young modulus of materials : ABS = 40Mpa ; Aluminium = 110Mpa ; Steel = 480Mpa. All has been said. Instead of plastics you want to use metal (preferably steel) which would cost you less, not more. Steel is 3 times cheaper than aluminium and 9 times cheaper than filament. QED.As an engineer, designing a machine is not a challenge to me. I don't want to play who's the smartest game. I just gave a kind advice on materials and had a nice talk with the author, as you can read. There's already a lot of DIY full metal CNC routers online.

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  • G300 - 3D Printed CNC Machine

    It's nice to talk constructively with you about that subject. The best argument we have is all the DIY CNC machines that have been built "good enough for hobby" that curiously beget to V2, V3, V4, etc. Obviously, all the previous versions was not "good" enough. Unfortunately, if you stay with wrong design choices, the upgrades will be endless. Late or soon, the cost of the upgrades will overtake a good genuine machine's price tag. That's why it is crucial to start with suitable materials and components. The machine may be small but will still works flawlessly. I missed the "skill/tool/precision" argument. Sorry about that. Actually anyone have (or eventually can get) a saw and a drill. That's just about basic skills. An automatic centring punch cost <$5. …

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    It's nice to talk constructively with you about that subject. The best argument we have is all the DIY CNC machines that have been built "good enough for hobby" that curiously beget to V2, V3, V4, etc. Obviously, all the previous versions was not "good" enough. Unfortunately, if you stay with wrong design choices, the upgrades will be endless. Late or soon, the cost of the upgrades will overtake a good genuine machine's price tag. That's why it is crucial to start with suitable materials and components. The machine may be small but will still works flawlessly. I missed the "skill/tool/precision" argument. Sorry about that. Actually anyone have (or eventually can get) a saw and a drill. That's just about basic skills. An automatic centring punch cost <$5. Just print a paper template, stick-it to the material. Punch right into the hole locations and drill. You can't miss. The precision will be as good as a 3D printed part, definitely. ;)

    Thank you, I already own several CNC mills. I built my first one back in 2003 (All metal). I do not plan to build another small CNC soon. Did you ever heard about the "3D printing paradox" ? This was brought up during the 80's : it says that every complex part which is difficult and long to be made by traditional ways is pretty easy to be done by additive manufacturing. On the other hand, every part which is quick and easy to be done with traditional ways is a non sense to be made by additive manufacturing : time consuming & much expensive. That's exactly my point. The parts of a CNC are easy to be made by traditional ways. You get better parts, in less time, and you save money. You're a smart guy. If you take some time to think about it, I'm sure you can find a way to make…

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    Thank you, I already own several CNC mills. I built my first one back in 2003 (All metal). I do not plan to build another small CNC soon. Did you ever heard about the "3D printing paradox" ? This was brought up during the 80's : it says that every complex part which is difficult and long to be made by traditional ways is pretty easy to be done by additive manufacturing. On the other hand, every part which is quick and easy to be done with traditional ways is a non sense to be made by additive manufacturing : time consuming & much expensive. That's exactly my point. The parts of a CNC are easy to be made by traditional ways. You get better parts, in less time, and you save money. You're a smart guy. If you take some time to think about it, I'm sure you can find a way to make any part from stock metal. For example, the four foot corners of your machine can be replaced by 2 metal plates which can be drilled at the same time for perfect alignment. This is no big deal. It's just about to select the right materials at the start and making your project out of it. :)

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  • G300 - 3D Printed CNC Machine

    I welcome the quality of the work done. It's a pretty clean job. In my humble opinion there's two design problems at the start : plastic and 3d printed parts, and belt drive, which both do not match with CNC router's structural parts or drive expectations. Definitely. What works fine for a CNC 3D printer can't be transposed into a CNC router, because the needs of precision, holding torque and rigidity are different. 3D printers, lasers, plasma have no forces to deal with on the tool head while the tool head is reasonably light. CNC routers/lathes have to deal with a lot of resistance and vibrations and the whole Z is heavy. Some people would say theirs works fine and there's hundred of examples around the web. Maybe. Anyway, the young modulus of thermoplastics speaks itself : it's not st…

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    I welcome the quality of the work done. It's a pretty clean job. In my humble opinion there's two design problems at the start : plastic and 3d printed parts, and belt drive, which both do not match with CNC router's structural parts or drive expectations. Definitely. What works fine for a CNC 3D printer can't be transposed into a CNC router, because the needs of precision, holding torque and rigidity are different. 3D printers, lasers, plasma have no forces to deal with on the tool head while the tool head is reasonably light. CNC routers/lathes have to deal with a lot of resistance and vibrations and the whole Z is heavy. Some people would say theirs works fine and there's hundred of examples around the web. Maybe. Anyway, the young modulus of thermoplastics speaks itself : it's not stiff enough for router applications. Sure you can still lower feed and speed and lower the depth of cut, etching a small amount of material at the time, and probably you will be able to get reasonably shaped parts, with inconveniences of expanding machining time and tools getting dull quickly. Keep in mind palm routers are not meant to work continuously during hours. Second, you can check it out in any manufacturer's specifications : belts stretch under load, that's just how belts are. So you want to oversize the belts to keep the stretch into a negligible amount. For a machine this size, a PE 15mm HTD5M would probably do the trick, but keep in mind belt driven system have low torque compared to screws. The second argument is "good enough" for hobby use. Machining time is a factor also for hobbyists who cannot work full time on projects. A good machine allow to jump quickly from a project to the next one. Several hobbies requires precision parts too : mechanical, models, etc. Hobbyists are not meant to maintenance their CNC router every next project. To me, requirements are not very different to professionals'. Industrial CNC routers offers good productivity 24/24 and low maintenance cost. That are the major differences. Last argument is the price. Actually, steel is cheaper than aluminium ($/3) or filament ($/9). Anyone's got a drill and knows how to drill a hole, and this would be much quicker than to print parts. Steel add some weight to the CNC router which is a good thing to dump machining vibrations. Whatever the point of view, I'm afraid 3D printed CNC router is a wrong good idea : mechanical properties are rubbish, it cost more and it takes more time.

    Easy : don't use plastic or 3D printed parts. Use metal instead : corners, tubing, metal plates. Just cut, drill and fasten. ;)

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  • Camping Car  ( Apocalypse Car )

    Oh, thank you. Sincerely. You made my day. That car will bring laughing tears on every face along the way.

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  • Congratulations ! I thing you engineered a pretty capable CNC router. I see nothing wrong about it. Straighteners for the Xends, a pretty stiff spindle carriage, good rails and correct transmission. Well done !

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  • Interesting method. Probably quicker than epoxy top coat. But as allways with coatings or smoothing, details are gone.

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder

    Les références peuvent changer d'un fournisseur à l'autre tu sais. Sur le lien que tu as donné ci-dessus oui, cela semble correspondre.

    Re,16mm c'est la hauteur de la partie bronze. 3/8" ça fait bien 9.525mm et c'est le diamètre du filetage.++JM

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder

    Merci Tony. Il s'agit bien d'un connecteur pneumatique 3/8" (9.525mm) pour le pas de vis (j'ai corrigé). Tu en trouveras sans peine sur Ebay ou Aliexpress avec les mots clés "3/8" pneumatic push in fitting".Bon shoping ;)

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable USB Magnetic Stirrer

    Actually the button "get this printed" seems accessible.

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Perfect (3d Printed) Hinge

    Hi David, depending of your printer accuracy, a good gap stands between 0.2 to 0.4mm. To find the right gap between layers without fusing them, you need to experiment because it can vary a lot.

    As long as you print far enough from the previous layer, the new deposit won't stick to the last surface. You need a lot of experiment to find the right gap for your part. Good luck !

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  • Hi Jeff,This is pretty easy. Go to the Thingiverse page (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2079995) and find the button called "Order this printed"Please note this is not a commercial link, I receive no affiliate money from the print service.Enjoy ;)Jean

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder

    Thank you Dan ! Pay attention to get a proper MK7 hobbed gear, then enjoy !

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    • Make a Professionnal Squeegie in Minutes
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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Perfect (3d Printed) Hinge

    Hi David. Thank you for your message. As you may know +0.2 is a tight fit. Here I'm using a hair more (0.3 or 0.4mm I can't remember).

    Thank you ! No secret at all : as you might know supports are removable because it stops just under the surface it's meant to support. So the upper filament deposit lay on it without sticking on it because it is not squeezed on. It's the same principle here. For holes, I used the tear shape instead of the rounded shape. So the print angle is always below 45° and prints great : you don't need any support. At the same time an open 270° cylinder hole is sufficient to hold a screw or a pin.

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  • J-Max's instructable USB Magnetic Stirrer's weekly stats:
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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable USB Magnetic Stirrer

    I meant *which box I need to check (oops).

    That was about the Creative Commons license. I needed to allow commercial use of the thing. I did. Enjoy.

    Hi, thanks ! I understand some people may not have access to a 3D printer. Well, on Thingiverse it seems every option is turned on. If I missed any option, feel free to tell me what box I need to check. Anyways you can simply forward the link or the .stl file to any trusty provider. For example, download the .stl from thingiverse, then upload it in 3dhubs.com. If you're lucky enough to have a fablab in your neighborhood, just go there with the thing number ;)

    Hi, thanks ! I understand some people may not have access to a 3D printer. Well, on Thingiverse it seems every option is turned on. If I missed any option, feel free to tell me what box I need to check. Anyways you can simply forward the link or the .stl file to any trusty provider. For example, download the .stl from thingiverse, then upload it in 3dhubs.com. If you're lucky enough to have a fablab in your neighborhood, just go there with the thing number ;)

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    • Festool MFT Mutlifunction Table : Make Your Own
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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder

    Hi Rexipus. Thank you for your comment, I really appreciate that. Well, I'm not into E3D's process, but we may consider the Titan is a light weight extruder, so it should be interesting in direct drive applications. In this purpose, the motor should be light weight too. Through, I don't know if the Titan's small gears can stand a lot of torque.My design is a long time development (for an individual) followed by more than 6 months beta testing by a 4 people team on various printers. We did it seriously. The main goals was quietness, quality and ease of use. That means no fail, whatever you may ask. With smaller motors, we experienced unconsistency of filament deposit on faster printers or low melting temperature filaments. Filaments with fibers also need extra torque. We did not wanted a s…

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    Hi Rexipus. Thank you for your comment, I really appreciate that. Well, I'm not into E3D's process, but we may consider the Titan is a light weight extruder, so it should be interesting in direct drive applications. In this purpose, the motor should be light weight too. Through, I don't know if the Titan's small gears can stand a lot of torque.My design is a long time development (for an individual) followed by more than 6 months beta testing by a 4 people team on various printers. We did it seriously. The main goals was quietness, quality and ease of use. That means no fail, whatever you may ask. With smaller motors, we experienced unconsistency of filament deposit on faster printers or low melting temperature filaments. Filaments with fibers also need extra torque. We did not wanted a setup at minimal, so a comfortable security margin was applied to print properly and cover any possible issue. With at last a 37mm long motor you can be confident, whatever your setup or settings : silent motor drivers (which provide less torque), overheating on long prints, hard core delta printer's speed, and so on. Just like we did : install it and forget it :)Probably you can make it work with 20mm motors, but stay in reasonable expectations because you won't have extra torque to stand any situation. Stick to 16 microsteps, and don't print fast with exotic filaments.On my setups, I use 17HS8401 motors (48mm). There's no huge difference on the price tag and the motor will never be to blame.

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  • J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder's weekly stats:
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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder

    Oh, thank you heinzdrei ! Your comment is greatly appreciated.You're absolutely right about the current generation. Otherhand, it's only a small amount of current generated. You could barely light up a led. You don't need a big motor, so the smaller it is, the less current is generated. I choosed to don't take the current generation in consideration, and it's true, any of my printers still work fine, even if I change filaments frequently. So do the beta tester's. As far as I know, they all kept it. But I understand you can be afraid about that. There's two solutions for you. First, the radial instert of the motor can help you. You just have to loose 3 screws and disengage the motor. You just slow down the operation by 10 to 15s if you leave a hex driver near the extruder. Another permane…

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    Oh, thank you heinzdrei ! Your comment is greatly appreciated.You're absolutely right about the current generation. Otherhand, it's only a small amount of current generated. You could barely light up a led. You don't need a big motor, so the smaller it is, the less current is generated. I choosed to don't take the current generation in consideration, and it's true, any of my printers still work fine, even if I change filaments frequently. So do the beta tester's. As far as I know, they all kept it. But I understand you can be afraid about that. There's two solutions for you. First, the radial instert of the motor can help you. You just have to loose 3 screws and disengage the motor. You just slow down the operation by 10 to 15s if you leave a hex driver near the extruder. Another permanent solution could be inserting a circuit with some diodes and a discharge protection, somewhere between the motor's wires. To me, it over complicates something that works well. I used to find a design good when there's nothing left to remove. I'm not into any additive design process. The simpler, the better IMHO.About the bigger pulley. My design is only a way to manage the feeding, whatever the care I put into it, it won't be universal anyways. The leading ideas was (in order) : practical, quiet, compact. By pratical I wanted to solve commun problems for the user, like unnecessary time consuming operations, lack of precision or torque, easy maintenance, wear problems. First, the gear size is also in close relationship with the belt and the shaft distance. Obviously it's not a single gear, it's a whole system. About pulleys, usualy, the smaller, the better. As the motor gear grows you reduce the torque which is dependent of the radial distance to the shaft centre. So, the system will be less efficient even if you enlarge the output pulley to keep the ratio unchanged. Then, if diameter of the pulleys changes, you need to raise the shafts linear distance to leave enough space for the radial insert tensioning system. Take in consideration that you will have also the belt factor to manage : size (which grows quicky, enlarging shaft distance, and its avalaibility. Plastic have also one big problem : it's not a very stiff material. If you enlarge, you need to make your housings thicker. So, as you can see, there's more disavantages to grow big. But I understand your consideration was much about retractation speed. And you're right, a fast retractation helps a lot to reduce the printing time. Between 16 to 20 tooth, you only get potentialy 20% more speed. Meanwhile, you loose some torque too. We know the speed of a motor, especialy in short moves, is dependent of the acceleration settings. The more torque you have, the quicker acceleration you can ask. There's calculation to do, but guess a differential of 4 tooth does not bring any significant speed difference. Actualy, the retractation speed with my bowden belt extruder is near 200% faster than on my previous Wade's. Note we never tryed to push the acceleration rate to the maximum (I put it in the to do list) but here I'm at 5m.s which is pretty quick.Thanks again for your interest ;)

    You're welcome mate ;)

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Perfect (3d Printed) Hinge

    Hi Thomas. I'm glad to have you here too. That hinge was designed to get the best possible strenght, so you don't need any metal part. On a 3d printed part, whatever it is, if you want to use a metal insert you need a lot of plastic around it to hold it in place. If not you will create a weak point. So, in most cases, using a metal insert is not a good idea. Here, the variable diameter plastic shaft gives extra strenght on the hinge. There's no weak point, that's the idea. You may find a lot of hinges on thingiverse which uses m3 screws as axis. All are incredibly weak except the extra thick ones. But the extra thick ones are not stronger than the variable shaft hinge, because the limit is plastic lamination itself. Quite the contrary, metal brings a lot of stress on plastic parts. That's…

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    Hi Thomas. I'm glad to have you here too. That hinge was designed to get the best possible strenght, so you don't need any metal part. On a 3d printed part, whatever it is, if you want to use a metal insert you need a lot of plastic around it to hold it in place. If not you will create a weak point. So, in most cases, using a metal insert is not a good idea. Here, the variable diameter plastic shaft gives extra strenght on the hinge. There's no weak point, that's the idea. You may find a lot of hinges on thingiverse which uses m3 screws as axis. All are incredibly weak except the extra thick ones. But the extra thick ones are not stronger than the variable shaft hinge, because the limit is plastic lamination itself. Quite the contrary, metal brings a lot of stress on plastic parts. That's why I called it the "perfect" hinge, because it gives the best possible strenght while using a small amount of plastic and it prints on a single step. As you don't need any hardware in it, it's also cheap and quick, because you can use it just out of the printbed. I don't claim this is the best hinge ever, it's still plastic and some other designs may be better in different situations. But if you need a flat hinge of 40mm for medium duty purpose, you probably should consider this one, just at it is.

    You're welcome mate. I should have mentioned that metal insert can be still interesting, but only if you want to avoid wear problems. For example, screwing directly in plastic is possible, of course with screws with a thread made for plastic, which is a long thread, because you need enough material between threads. So if you use the right screw it will be ok UNTIL you don't have to remove the screw frequently. In this case, the plastic will get loose quickly. So you will want a metal insert to avoid wear problems. But, like it is always with metal vs plastic, you need enough plastic to stand metal stress. This will be compression stress in this configuration.Anyways, you'll see when you'll get your first printer : there's a lot to learn about that technology. May I suggest you document yo…

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    You're welcome mate. I should have mentioned that metal insert can be still interesting, but only if you want to avoid wear problems. For example, screwing directly in plastic is possible, of course with screws with a thread made for plastic, which is a long thread, because you need enough material between threads. So if you use the right screw it will be ok UNTIL you don't have to remove the screw frequently. In this case, the plastic will get loose quickly. So you will want a metal insert to avoid wear problems. But, like it is always with metal vs plastic, you need enough plastic to stand metal stress. This will be compression stress in this configuration.Anyways, you'll see when you'll get your first printer : there's a lot to learn about that technology. May I suggest you document yourself about the "3d printing paradox ?" But this is one of the coolest tool I never had !

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder

    You can't imagine how handy this is ! You want to push the filament to the hotend thru the bowden tube. Depending of the printer I use it's between 260 to 320mm. This is a lot of turns as one turn pushes the filament few millimeters away. With the crank you drive the filament to the hotend in few seconds. Note this is a compact extruder, so the large pulley is not that big. Definitely, the crank is more comfortable. Give it a try, and you will keep it ;)

    Well, when you buy a cheap kit, you probably start to improve it with better printed parts. You're right. But if you sourced good parts or bought a nice printer since the sart, then you'll probably find it usefull in many other tasks. Whatever is your centre of interest. You're right for the flat side of the shaft. Especialy if your MK7 have only one screw to lock on to the shaft. It's a shame but I was not brave enough to film a new video !

    I will upgrade the BOM and talk about that flat side on the M5 bolt. Thank you so much for your comment.

    Great idea ! My main printer is in a heated chamber and the feeder lives outside. I mean it's a closed box with the filament roll and the extruder on top. But I will ask some friends to send me pictures, so we will see different mounting options (Tarantula, Prusa I3, CoreXY...). I'll try to show all in the same picture.

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  • J-Max commented on J-Max's instructable Bowden Belt Extruder

    Thank you so much. I sincerely appreciate.

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  • J-Max followed J-Max
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  • J-Max's entry Perfect (3d Printed) Hinge is a winner in the 3D Printing Contest 2016 contest