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  • REUSE YOUR OLD LAPTOP BATTERY TO MAKE a POWER BANK

    No, its still safe to harvest the "good" batteries from inside the pack; many of the individual batteries may be quick good. Once you get the individual batteries out, just toss the ones that are below the voltage previously discussed.Reason: The whole "pack" may show dead because the circuitry in the "pack" detects a couple bad batteries it cuts off that/those sections; so a couple of bad batteries can make the "overall pack" dead. But for using the individual batteries inside in other projects, you may still have luck.I've personally harvested a dead pack from a Sony laptop and gotten 8 good batteries from 9 originally in the pack; they were even fully charged when I pulled them out. That 9th battery just shorted in the pack and the circuit k...

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    No, its still safe to harvest the "good" batteries from inside the pack; many of the individual batteries may be quick good. Once you get the individual batteries out, just toss the ones that are below the voltage previously discussed.Reason: The whole "pack" may show dead because the circuitry in the "pack" detects a couple bad batteries it cuts off that/those sections; so a couple of bad batteries can make the "overall pack" dead. But for using the individual batteries inside in other projects, you may still have luck.I've personally harvested a dead pack from a Sony laptop and gotten 8 good batteries from 9 originally in the pack; they were even fully charged when I pulled them out. That 9th battery just shorted in the pack and the circuit killed the entire thing.

    If they have some charge and you chop into them with an axe, maybe (there's fun youtube video's about that).If they are completely dead, no. Just don't recharge the dead ones.

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  • REUSE YOUR OLD LAPTOP BATTERY TO MAKE A POWER BANK

    Discharged lithium batteries aren't dangerous in an of themselves with a caveat. If a Lithium battery drops below 2v don't recharge it, it can be dangerous afterward. Basically when a battery drops below 2v it dissolves some of the metal inside, and when you re-charge it after that the dissolved metal can short inside the battery. That can make the battery dangerous (fire/explosion).Some people find 3v a safer (e.g. use 3v in what I said above), but personnally I think thats overly cautios.

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  • Autonomous Control of RC Car Using Arduino

    the L298N has a 3V drop between VCC and your motors... it works great but only on high voltage applications. You can make your own H-Bridge too but have to use higher end transistors to avoid the same voltage drop... 2n390x won't work very well. This becomes price prohibitive.For most cars the original poster's idea works well and is super easy, and you end up using the cars built-in H-Bridge which is usually more efficient. Most cheap RC cars use the same control chip so the wiring is the same (even on different brands). The poster in this case identified the wiring on this model RC car, but if you look closely at the actual board you will find the same chip (and pins) on most other cars as well. You just have to verify which wires trigger forward/backward/left/right and use the A...

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    the L298N has a 3V drop between VCC and your motors... it works great but only on high voltage applications. You can make your own H-Bridge too but have to use higher end transistors to avoid the same voltage drop... 2n390x won't work very well. This becomes price prohibitive.For most cars the original poster's idea works well and is super easy, and you end up using the cars built-in H-Bridge which is usually more efficient. Most cheap RC cars use the same control chip so the wiring is the same (even on different brands). The poster in this case identified the wiring on this model RC car, but if you look closely at the actual board you will find the same chip (and pins) on most other cars as well. You just have to verify which wires trigger forward/backward/left/right and use the Arduino to flip those positive or negative to activate each circuit. Pretty easy once you do it once or twice.

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