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  • Benches and Tables Built As Stressed Skin Panels

    Am also interested in what has been found to work well in terms of gluing to EPS...(?)

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  • JamesB670 commented on Tuomas Soikkeli's instructable Manual Bar Bender / Scrolling Tool10 months ago
    Manual Bar Bender / Scrolling Tool

    Awesome design. I didn't notice any mention of how you make the "templates", but those are awesome too! Are they made of mild steel? The curved shapes seem to be very smooth and cut very square in the vertical dimension; how do you achieve that in a small shop!?(Toumas, you did fine with the written English for your intended purpose, but if you would ever like someone to look over your script before you publish; I'm sure that plenty of people would be happy to help on such good Instructables--myself included.)

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  • JamesB670 commented on jessyratfink's instructable Unusual Uses for Dryer Sheets1 year ago
    Unusual Uses for Dryer Sheets

    Nice! I just heard yesterday that dryer sheets work great at preventing biting horse flys from biting! (Field tested in the marshes of "the Jersey Shore.)

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  • JamesB670 commented on Naran's instructable Cheapest Smart Home for $381 year ago
    Cheapest Smart Home for $38

    There is a lot to this project; but I am really lost where it says "just plug the WebCam in". Plug the WebCam into what; what connectors are involved ??

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  • JamesB670 commented on AndrewC24's instructable Montreal Style Whole Wheat Bagels1 year ago
    Montreal Style Whole Wheat Bagels

    Super confused about the "1 egg"; it is used in the dough AND the yolk is mixed with water and brushed on the boiled bagel; how is that accomplished??

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  • 6.3 kiloWatt Ground Mount Home Solar Array

    Very nice project, very well presented. Also, I am glad you are helping dispel the idea that one can simply "home-brew" a solar-electrical system which is intended to be in any way attached to a residence; as you laid out, there are a variety of professionals and gov't/utility representatives who will need to be involved. As an early solar adopter (relative to my area) and fellow EE, I somewhat disagree with a point you made a few times: "there is no incentive to produce more than I use"; this should be subject to some thought in the system sizing process. If you even remotely possibly might get one or more plug-in electric vehicles in the future, you will need more capacity. (And in a 20 to 40 year planning horizon, who can conclusively rule that out?) If you h...

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    Very nice project, very well presented. Also, I am glad you are helping dispel the idea that one can simply "home-brew" a solar-electrical system which is intended to be in any way attached to a residence; as you laid out, there are a variety of professionals and gov't/utility representatives who will need to be involved. As an early solar adopter (relative to my area) and fellow EE, I somewhat disagree with a point you made a few times: "there is no incentive to produce more than I use"; this should be subject to some thought in the system sizing process. If you even remotely possibly might get one or more plug-in electric vehicles in the future, you will need more capacity. (And in a 20 to 40 year planning horizon, who can conclusively rule that out?) If you have kids that are growing into teens, you will need more capacity. If you think you can move some of your fossil-fuel home heating over to a heat pump (such as using a split AC/heater), you could use more capacity. If you are concerned that the local lobbyists might someday manage to get net metering partially or totally revoked, you could future-proof with more capacity. If you think you might someday supplement your swimming pool heating with a heat-pump-style pool heater, you could future-proof with more capacity. Etc. (As you well know, many of the sunk costs of the project don't go up when you add more panels and racks and possibly resize the inverter and home-run wiring, such as design fees, application fees (if any), trenching costs, cement delivery fee, etc, etc.) (In my jurisdiction, you can only build to I believe it is 92% of your historic usage*. (To insure that the power company will alway have some positive cash flow, I suppose.) I made the mistake of converting over to LED lighting and energy star appliances a year or two too soon, and leasing a Chevy Volt a year too late, so I am now stuck with a non-insignificant bill from both the solar company and the power company many months of the year. (You might be interested to hear that my system cannot be resized; the fire code has been changed so that even my current roof coverage wouldn't be allowed if proposed to be installed today.))*Yes, I think that people that have a similar limit should consider "gaming the system" to some extent by using MORE than their normal amounts of electricity in the baseline year (or whatever the assessment period is) prior to going solar. (This is not attempting dishonesty or even disingenuousness; it is merely making provisions for very real, fully-anticipated future conditions over a VERY long planning horizon, in the face of a rule that does not consider the possibility, and in my view, likely high probability of increased residential power needs in the future.)

    You mentioned a nice, short payback. Have you ever calculated the dollar value of the power that your system will produce over it's lifetime, using the "official" price increase projections for electric power / power delivery? In terms of the lifetime value of incrementally adding more panels, if we look at the best panel prices today, say $0.55 per watt (if we are able to tap into "large quantity" pricing), and if we were to incrementally add 1000 watts to an already built-out system, that would cost $550 (plus mounting and such), and would produce about 875 kWh per year in my area, with a value of about $220 delivered power also in my area, or worth about $4000 (with some discounting for degradation) over the course of 20 years. This is a payback of around 7 x on...

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    You mentioned a nice, short payback. Have you ever calculated the dollar value of the power that your system will produce over it's lifetime, using the "official" price increase projections for electric power / power delivery? In terms of the lifetime value of incrementally adding more panels, if we look at the best panel prices today, say $0.55 per watt (if we are able to tap into "large quantity" pricing), and if we were to incrementally add 1000 watts to an already built-out system, that would cost $550 (plus mounting and such), and would produce about 875 kWh per year in my area, with a value of about $220 delivered power also in my area, or worth about $4000 (with some discounting for degradation) over the course of 20 years. This is a payback of around 7 x on each dollar invested, which is a pretty awesome payback! (Of course, I neglected other costs, but I also neglected inflation of power costs over time, and on the flip side, neglected the value of an alternate investment of the money, so I will leave it at that.)I suppose that the broader point is that the panels are now not the major cost component in the overall cost of an installed and approved-for-operation solar power system; it's everything altogether (even more so if accomplished without professional free help in some key areas as you managed to do), so I would say that "more panels is better" is getting to be a pretty good bet!

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