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JimTheSoundman

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112CommentsWinter Park, FL
Audio Video engineer for 30 years, mostly live events.

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  • I Love You/I Know Wall Art

    It also reminds me of this: https://youtu.be/50pl9u6tyTc?t=68

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  • See-Through Arduino UNO

    There aren't any pictures of you doing the actual resin casting. That would have been helpful. To me that's the most unique part of the process and you skipped right over it.I see the empty mold, and I see the finished product, but nothing in between.

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  • EBike Conversion - Coffee Hauler

    Could you give us a rundown on all the costs? Also a rough timeframe of how many hours it took?

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  • JimTheSoundman commented on mlocke's instructable Outdoor Wall Light
    Outdoor Wall Light

    This isn't really an instructable. An instructable shows you how to replicate the project yourself in a step-by-step manner. This is just a finished product and a blanket statement to "figure it out yourself" which is kind of the antithesis of what this site is all about.

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  • What was the total cost in materials?What would you estimate the total hours of labor to be?

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  • Instead of buying Oreos for the dirt, use "Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafers" as they are the same thing as Oreos, but without any filling. https://goo.gl/images/PF7BQG

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  • This would be excellent for a home studio, but I'd love to see a second instructable for one which can be disassembled for travel, and is more durable. I would think that this foil and paper and cardboard would end up destroyed in a matter of weeks if you tried to take this on the road with you.

    Greaseproof paper is a British term for what Americans call waxed paper, but you could probably use parchment paper also. You might have to experiment to see which works best for you.If you want to upgrade from there, you can go to a theatrical lighting supply company and buy "diffusion gel" which is the plastic sheets that they put over theatrical lights to produce the same effect. And actually, probably any sort of thin white fabric would also work, but it might get dirty or dusty over time.

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  • You didn't mention the fact that you will have to somehow disable the constant beeping of the power loss alarm.

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  • So what caused the power supply to fail initially?

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  • I agree with Artskater, OSB is a bad choice for the top deck, you should use pressure treated plywood. That OSB will swell up and fall apart in a matter of days or weeks unless kept perfectly dry.

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  • I agree with XinixE. I have been an audio engineer for 31 years and I've always used WD-40 for cleaning the faders on my mixing boards when they started to sound scratchy, never had a problem in the least. It's a great contact cleaner.As for the people saying that you shouldn't get it on your hands because the MSDS says prolonged contact will be harmful: The key word there is "PROLONGED." That means if you go to work and have it on your hands for 8 hours every day, then you are going to have problems. That seems like common sense to me. Using it to clean your hands for five minutes is not prolonged contact and you will suffer no ill effects.

    I agree with XinixE. I have been an audio engineer for 31 years and I've always used WD-40 for cleaning the faders on my mixing boards when they started to sound scratchy, never had a problem in the least. It's a great contact cleaner.As for the people saying that you shouldn't get it on your hands because the MSDS says prolonged contact will be harmful: The key word there is "PROLONGED." That means if you go to work and have it on your hands for 8 hours every day, then you are going to have problems. That seems like common sense to me. Using it to clean your hands for five minutes is not prolonged contact and you will suffer no ill effects.

    I agree with XinixE. I have been an audio engineer for 31 years and I've always used WD-40 for cleaning the faders on my mixing boards when they started to sound scratchy, never had a problem in the least. It's a great contact cleaner.As for the people saying that you shouldn't get it on your hands because the MSDS says prolonged contact will be harmful: The key word there is "PROLONGED." That means if you go to work and have it on your hands for 8 hours every day, then you are going to have problems. That seems like common sense to me. Using it to clean your hands for five minutes is not prolonged contact and you will suffer no ill effects.

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  • @pgabriel3 - Why would you want to use an electric motor to generate electricity? Doesn't make any sense. Electric generators are usually powered by something other than electricity, such as steam or water or gasoline or diesel fuel. But yes, a electrical generator works on basically these same principles. Instead of using an electromagnet to spin a wheel, you are doing the opposite, spinning the wheel first with a turbine or a pulley or belt, and the interaction between magnetic forces will then generate electricity.

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  • Now make one that says "None Shall Pass" which is the Black Knight's saying from MP & The Holy Grail.

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  • Just so everyone knows... do NOT use a giant knife switch like this with anything above 12 volts. If you try to use a knife switch with 120v or 240v AC you might get a nasty shock.It appears that this knife switch in this Instructable is simply used as a mounting plate and the brown and blue wires (240v AC) are bypassing it completely. So that's the correct way to do it.

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  • I don't understand what "rooter" means. Did you mean "router"?

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  • 400 watts divided by 12 volts is 33.33 amps. You can check this chart to see what size wire you need for 33 amps. http://www.allfordmustangs.com/forums/attachments/...Then on the output side, 400 watts divided by 120 volts is 3.33 amps.The other thing to consider is that no inverter is 100% efficient, so if it's putting out 92% to 96% of what it takes in from the battery, you are doing good. So keep that in mind and oversize the input wires a bit to give yourself a safety margin.Also, you should have a fuse somewhere inline on both the input and the output, in case of an accidental short circuit. Many inverters have an automatic circuit breaker built in, but make sure yours does. If not, you can get an inline fuse at any autoparts store.

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  • HP Sauce is a unique product unto itself, but the closest equivalent American product would be A-1 Steak Sauce.

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  • I agree. Split it up into managable sessions. Just tell yourself "I will work on this every day from 1pm to 2:30pm" and that will force you to set aside that time every day, just as though it was a job where you had to show up on time or get fired. Make sure you are ready to work exactly at 1pm and don't take any breaks until 2:30pm. You'll be surprised at how much you'll get done.

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  • He said he got it from a local glass company for 100 bucks.I'm sure they used something insanely expensive to cut it, like a water jet cutter, so it's probably much better than trying to cut it yourself. Sometimes there is just no substitute for having a professional deal with it.

    If you try to make this all in one day it will look like garbage. Take your time and do it right. You'll be so much happier in the end. Remember this is something you'll be looking at for ten or twenty years, you don't want to be reminded of all the shortcuts you took, every time you sit down next to it.

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  • Taz, what you need to do is just get an "old work" blue plastic wall box and a blank plate. Install the old work box, with the romex inside it. Then use a couple red wire nuts to cap off the cut ends of the wires. Then fold them up in the box and put the blank plate over it. If you ever end up needing to install something there at a later time, it will be still there, ready and waiting for a new use.

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  • The finish on this looks amazing. I'm definitely going to steal that idea.Just so everyone knows, the formal name for this is a "Double Knife Blade Switch" in case anyone needs to look up a picture of a real one.

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  • Yes, the sizes are the nominal sizes, what we nowadays would refer to as "rough lumber." Long ago the lumber mills offered finished lumber as an option and most people ended up buying it that way, but to avoid confusion, the lumbermills kept the same "rough cut" name. So almost all lumber nowadays is sold S4S, which means "surfaced four sides" which is why a 2 x 4 is only 1.5 x 3.5.

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  • I think the finished product looks wonderful, but I do see one flaw in your plan. What happens if you move? That would be difficult to take off the wall, as you covered up the screws holding to the wall with the lath strips.I would think a french cleat hanger would work better. Or maybe two, one high and one low. You could still use the trim strips on the edges to hide the gap. Then if you ever need to move, just lift it off the wall. French cleat hangars are very strong and very stable.

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  • I take it part two of the video isn't completed yet. To propel it through the water, why don't you make something that turns the rotational force of the back wheel into a spinning crankshaft to drive propellers? Imagine if you were able to squeeze two polyurethane tires, like a pair of inline skate wheels, against the side of the standard bike tire. You would need some sort of clamping mechanism that could be easily released of course to move them away from the back tire when you were on the road, sort of like how bicycle caliper brakes squeeze the back tire. So now imagine a steel rod attached to those two skate tires, and angled down at about 30 degrees into the water. Put a propeller on each steel rod and you have a nice little propeller system with two propellers.Next step after t…

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    I take it part two of the video isn't completed yet. To propel it through the water, why don't you make something that turns the rotational force of the back wheel into a spinning crankshaft to drive propellers? Imagine if you were able to squeeze two polyurethane tires, like a pair of inline skate wheels, against the side of the standard bike tire. You would need some sort of clamping mechanism that could be easily released of course to move them away from the back tire when you were on the road, sort of like how bicycle caliper brakes squeeze the back tire. So now imagine a steel rod attached to those two skate tires, and angled down at about 30 degrees into the water. Put a propeller on each steel rod and you have a nice little propeller system with two propellers.Next step after that is to put a sliding dropdown rudder on the front wheel to steer.

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  • If you are clever you should be able to guess where Yonatan lives by examining that pill bottle.

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  • I'm all about peace and love, but I also think there should be some minimum standards to be considered an Instructable. Otherwise anyone could post anything. This place isn't supposed to be a "Ooooh lookie lookie see what I've built!" site, it's supposed to be a resource for newbies. I agree with Endlesshunt that if you don't have instructions for beginners, then it's useless, the experts already have the needed skills and so wouldn't even be watching it. I also think drawing a parallel with IKEA is not really applicable, as IKEA provides all the necessary parts, and each part is clearly diagrammed or labeled so there is no confusion. In this Instructable the only thing labeled is the length of the metal rod at 420mm. But what kind of rod is it? Steel, I would assume. …

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    I'm all about peace and love, but I also think there should be some minimum standards to be considered an Instructable. Otherwise anyone could post anything. This place isn't supposed to be a "Ooooh lookie lookie see what I've built!" site, it's supposed to be a resource for newbies. I agree with Endlesshunt that if you don't have instructions for beginners, then it's useless, the experts already have the needed skills and so wouldn't even be watching it. I also think drawing a parallel with IKEA is not really applicable, as IKEA provides all the necessary parts, and each part is clearly diagrammed or labeled so there is no confusion. In this Instructable the only thing labeled is the length of the metal rod at 420mm. But what kind of rod is it? Steel, I would assume. But I don't know, and that's the point. What is the diameter? Why is the baseplate green? Why does it have a slot chiseled out of it? What sort of motor? What voltage? Where can I buy this motor? How is the power controlled for the motor? Is there even an on/off switch? How do I keep the wood blocks from sliding around? What do I use for a tool rest? I could go on and on, but hopefully you get my point.

    This isn't an Instrucible. It has no instructions. Unless you watch the video you have no idea how to make this. The author needs to put actual real step by step instructions on how to build this, otherwise this is nothing more than an advertisement for a video.

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