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  • JoeH9 commented on DrewPaulDesigns's instructable Easy Tesla Coil!5 months ago
    Easy Tesla Coil!

    The thing that makes this such a 'darling' technology is that it is currently being adopted by the U.S. Military. The modern soldier is loaded with electronics from GPS to night vision, smart rifles and cameras to H.U.D. in the helmet, and they are all wirelessly networked. That requires a lot of constantly available power, which can be (is) broadcast over a battlefield to keep everyones batteries constantly charged. The important part is that it has progressed out of the research/experimental realm and has reached the stage of semi-practicality, at the least. While the military may not be above spending far too much for seemingly little return, one thing they are is efficient so they will waste no time in perfecting the science. Now we can see what exactly the chemtrails that ...

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    The thing that makes this such a 'darling' technology is that it is currently being adopted by the U.S. Military. The modern soldier is loaded with electronics from GPS to night vision, smart rifles and cameras to H.U.D. in the helmet, and they are all wirelessly networked. That requires a lot of constantly available power, which can be (is) broadcast over a battlefield to keep everyones batteries constantly charged. The important part is that it has progressed out of the research/experimental realm and has reached the stage of semi-practicality, at the least. While the military may not be above spending far too much for seemingly little return, one thing they are is efficient so they will waste no time in perfecting the science. Now we can see what exactly the chemtrails that used to be a conspiracy theory are really all about: For the past decade and a half they have been dumping ionizing particles into the atmosphere to make it more conductive....

    I see you chose the blue pill...."Using the 3.6-megawatt high-frequency (HF) HAARP transmitter, the plasma clouds, or balls of plasma, are being studied for use as artificial mirrors at altitudes 50 kilometers below the natural ionosphere and are to be used for reflection of HF radar and communications signals."Past attempts to produce electron density enhancements have yielded densities of 4 x 105 electrons per cubic centimeter (cm3) using HF radio transmissions near the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency. This frequency near 1.44 MHz is the rate that electrons gyrate around the Earth's magnetic field."The NRL group succeeded in producing artificial plasma clouds with densities exceeding 9 x 105 electrons cm3 using HAARP transmission ...

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    I see you chose the blue pill...."Using the 3.6-megawatt high-frequency (HF) HAARP transmitter, the plasma clouds, or balls of plasma, are being studied for use as artificial mirrors at altitudes 50 kilometers below the natural ionosphere and are to be used for reflection of HF radar and communications signals."Past attempts to produce electron density enhancements have yielded densities of 4 x 105 electrons per cubic centimeter (cm3) using HF radio transmissions near the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency. This frequency near 1.44 MHz is the rate that electrons gyrate around the Earth's magnetic field."The NRL group succeeded in producing artificial plasma clouds with densities exceeding 9 x 105 electrons cm3 using HAARP transmission at the sixth harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency."https://www.nrl.navy.mil/media/news-releases/2013/nrl-scientists-produce-densest-artificial-ionospheric-plasma-clouds-using-haarp

    Ummmm.... The parts list specifies AWG 27 Insulated Magnet Wire, which is .0142" in diameter, giving us about 70 rows/inch. We need 6.5 inches (7" - (1/4" * 2)) means 457 turns. Circumference = pi * diameter, or 6.28" per turn, gives us 2,875" or so, leaving 2" at each end. It works out to roughly 240'. There are pictures of the capacitors, and we all know 3 .1uF caps in parallel is no different than a single .3uF.As for the heat sink, the photo should help you a little, and as far as a bolt size, I think anything that fits will work.I could go on, but my point should be readily apparent.Instructables are for Makers. By definition we improvise, tinker and find ways to make things work. We do not need safe spaces, step-by-step instructions, or any...

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    Ummmm.... The parts list specifies AWG 27 Insulated Magnet Wire, which is .0142" in diameter, giving us about 70 rows/inch. We need 6.5 inches (7" - (1/4" * 2)) means 457 turns. Circumference = pi * diameter, or 6.28" per turn, gives us 2,875" or so, leaving 2" at each end. It works out to roughly 240'. There are pictures of the capacitors, and we all know 3 .1uF caps in parallel is no different than a single .3uF.As for the heat sink, the photo should help you a little, and as far as a bolt size, I think anything that fits will work.I could go on, but my point should be readily apparent.Instructables are for Makers. By definition we improvise, tinker and find ways to make things work. We do not need safe spaces, step-by-step instructions, or anyone to think for us. Unfortunately, our liberal, left-wing saturated education system is hell-bent on teaching what to think rather than how to think nowadays. So far Gen-X, Gen-Next and the Millennials have all failed to out-perform their preceeding generation. Did Western civilization reach it's zenith with the baby-boomers, or is there hope for Gen-Z, despite their parents? And when did they stop teaching basic math?

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  • Convert an ATX Power Supply Into a Regular DC Power Supply!

    Sounds like you are one of those people who has a power supply that requires a minimum load to function correctly. One thing I have noticed that most tutorials fail to mention is while a load resistor may be required on the +5v rail in some PSU's, they should be included any time you repurpose an ATX power supply. It will not only stabilize the voltage on all rails, it will raise the +12v rail closer to 12 volts if it is slightly low. (And without a resistor or other +5v load, it probably is...)The preferred load is a 10 ohm 10 watt sandstone resistor, like this:Find the flattest side and smooth it on an emory board. Smooth the inside of your PSU to remove any burrs then wire-tie the resistor to the case using heatsink compound like this: Solder it to one of the +5v (red) wires and ...

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    Sounds like you are one of those people who has a power supply that requires a minimum load to function correctly. One thing I have noticed that most tutorials fail to mention is while a load resistor may be required on the +5v rail in some PSU's, they should be included any time you repurpose an ATX power supply. It will not only stabilize the voltage on all rails, it will raise the +12v rail closer to 12 volts if it is slightly low. (And without a resistor or other +5v load, it probably is...)The preferred load is a 10 ohm 10 watt sandstone resistor, like this:Find the flattest side and smooth it on an emory board. Smooth the inside of your PSU to remove any burrs then wire-tie the resistor to the case using heatsink compound like this: Solder it to one of the +5v (red) wires and ground. One other possibility, if your PSU is fairly new: It may have 'sense' wires that monitor the voltage and prevent it from operating without proper voltage on the sense wire. The rule of thumb is: If any of the power pins on the 24 pin connector of your PSU has two wires attached to it, make sure to keep them together whether you use that rail or not. Even if you cut them, be sure to wire them back together. Usually the second wire will be the same color as the power wire, but a slightly lighter shade, but it will be much thinner. Remember, an ATX power supply is specifically built to power a computer, which are fairly voltage sensitive items. As such, modern power supplies monitor the voltage they supply and will shut down in order to protect the computer. The allowable range of voltage needed on the sense circuit has a much wider tolerance than the allowable voltage of the PSU for the most part, but it will not operate at 0v!

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  • JoeH9 commented on johnwmillr's instructable MIDI Drum Machine Costume1 year ago
    MIDI Drum Machine Costume

    I have wanted to do this from the minute I saw this video... Thanx!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBOQcQO0IFI

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