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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable ESP8266 Direct Data Communication5 days ago
    ESP8266 Direct Data Communication

    possibly.... Just try it. I compiled the code from different locations and templates. Since then, I did not dig into the TCP stuff but rather using the UDP stuff. Even after reading the code multiple time, I did not remeber the function of that bit. So just try and see... ;-)

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester7 days ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Hi sahilmore13285,It would be helpfull to know where you are stuck. Did you change the baudrate to 1200? Did you set the communication via the serial monitor to "CR and NL", etc? If you have some addional information for me, probably I am able to help. To be honest; there are no more stepts than described in the instructables.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester19 days ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Hi Thorbehrens,The program expects a CR and NL at the end of any inputs via the serial monitor. This can be set in the lower right corner of the serial monitor. This might be the problem. The baudrate might be a problem aswell, but I assume this is correct, as I imply that you can read the messages.If both topics are not the issue, that some debugging in the code might be necessary. I help is required, please send me a message, I will then try to help.Regards,Joris

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester4 weeks ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Hi Sahilmore13285,that is a bit difficult to say from here. The serial monitor should be set to the appropriate baud rate (normally 9600 or 1200 when in upload modus) and should be set to "NL" better "CR and NL". The "v" should be confirmed with pressing return.Hope this helps.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester4 weeks ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Hi Sahilmore13285,in the serial monitor you can observe the test patterns applied to the chip. So, in case you have a chip which is not found, you can look have a look at the test pattern on the serial monitor to identify why the chip was not identified. For this, you have to type in "v" first.Regards

    Hi TejasR7,that seems to be a reoccuring problem. There are many different libaries available and it even seem to matter how they were installed. Please see the hint of wkozey in the comment history. Probably this helps. Other hintgs are given in the Arduino forum.Regards.

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  • JorBi's instructable ESP8266 Direct Data Communication's weekly stats: 5 months ago
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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap5 months ago
    Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap

    That this design is indeed BFO-ish came to my mind aswell after my last reply. But, a BFO design with a pretty strong magnetic field to start with. When leaving the the capacitor, then you would be talking about a standard PI detector. As the standard PI-detectors do have the problem of the inverted pulse after switching off the FET, you are back to the standard design with a additional supply voltage (e.g. GoldPic), with a decoupling condenser (e. g. Pirat) or to the Flip-Coil design of my other instructable. As I said, I am working on a (hopefully) better version of this LC-Trap design. hopefully soon to come....and if building a real PI, capacitance is one of the things you don't like, because it leads to oscillation.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap5 months ago
    Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap

    Hi ArtemM5,Thanx for the feedback. The general approach looks interesting. But bringing in the OpAmp the way you are doing is just adding "comparator". The Arduino itself has a comparator itself already. So unless you are using it as an amplifier this would not improve much from my point of view.In general: The thing I am not entirely sure about is what the underlying working principle of the LC configuration is. For the general Pulse Induction (PI) detectors, a magnetic field is created, then "deleted" and the coil listens to "slow" eddy-currents near the coil. In the LC-Trap version I assume, that we are not really listening to "slow" eddy currents but rather changes in the inductivity and damping of the coil (which might be due to creating eddy...

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    Hi ArtemM5,Thanx for the feedback. The general approach looks interesting. But bringing in the OpAmp the way you are doing is just adding "comparator". The Arduino itself has a comparator itself already. So unless you are using it as an amplifier this would not improve much from my point of view.In general: The thing I am not entirely sure about is what the underlying working principle of the LC configuration is. For the general Pulse Induction (PI) detectors, a magnetic field is created, then "deleted" and the coil listens to "slow" eddy-currents near the coil. In the LC-Trap version I assume, that we are not really listening to "slow" eddy currents but rather changes in the inductivity and damping of the coil (which might be due to creating eddy currents in nearby objects or storing more energy in the magnetic field). Therefore I would suspect, that there are in fact 3 measures to increase the sensitivity.1. Better detection of the offrequency shift e.g. by higher resolution (measuring the change of inductance). I am working on that topic, butstill no decent code available.2. Better detectionof the amount of pulses (change in energy/damping characteristics) e.g. by using an OpAmp and counting the pulses at theend.3. Bringing inmore power to increase the effects of 1 and 2.Mycurrent focus (not very focused though) is to find ways to stabilize andincrease the resolution of the frequency shift detection.Hope this helps.Joris

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap6 months ago
    Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap

    I would recommend the Pirat or the SurfPI. Depending on the metal content of the mine and the metal in the support structure of the detector, detection depths of 5-20cm are realistic. This is depending on the soil aswel.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap6 months ago
    Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap

    Hi Vrishali,thanks for considering this. Yes, in general speaking that would be possible. BUT: The performance of this detector is not state of the art, probably even to be considered as pretty bad. I have some mineclearance background myself and to my experience you would like to have the best detection capabilities possible, expecially with some low metal content mines like the type 72. There have been quite fierce discussions about what would be better: mine infested countryside with the awereness not to go there or cleared area with a single mine undetected. The peope I spoke to who had their leg blown off by a lindmine, definitely would vote for the first.I would defineitely encourage you to keep on with the mine detection robot, but please chose for the best options as you are de...

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    Hi Vrishali,thanks for considering this. Yes, in general speaking that would be possible. BUT: The performance of this detector is not state of the art, probably even to be considered as pretty bad. I have some mineclearance background myself and to my experience you would like to have the best detection capabilities possible, expecially with some low metal content mines like the type 72. There have been quite fierce discussions about what would be better: mine infested countryside with the awereness not to go there or cleared area with a single mine undetected. The peope I spoke to who had their leg blown off by a lindmine, definitely would vote for the first.I would defineitely encourage you to keep on with the mine detection robot, but please chose for the best options as you are dealing with human lifes. If you are iterested, we could follow up on this discussion outside of instrucables.Regards,JorBi

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  • Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - Flip Coil

    Did you have feedback for me in regards to the problems (different mosfets etc.) you were facing? Still aiming for improvements.Thanks, Joris

    Experimenting is the best way to gain experience!I tried different coils, and found out, that the large coils do not give good results with the given circuit and voltage. I did some experiementing myself with different coil sizes and different windings and applied voltages. Please be aware, that large inductance will produce high voltage (> 100V) which might damage components and might hurt. Though there is some theory to be found in the WWW...

    That question is directing into the physics of coils overall.First of all, for Pulse Induction Metal detectors the Magnetic field should be a strong as possible, but the energy stored should be as small as possible. Why? The magnetic field induces the eddy-currents in the conducting objecs (metal). The stronger the magnetic field, the stronger the currents. At the other heand, the eddy currents only occur at the change of a magnetic field. So the faster the field changes, the higher the currents. Now the speed in changing the magnetic field depends on the total engery stored in the coil and the internal resistance of the coil (as the resistance of the coil resists the discharge of the field). The resistance depents ont the length of the wire and the diameter of the wire. In small object...

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    That question is directing into the physics of coils overall.First of all, for Pulse Induction Metal detectors the Magnetic field should be a strong as possible, but the energy stored should be as small as possible. Why? The magnetic field induces the eddy-currents in the conducting objecs (metal). The stronger the magnetic field, the stronger the currents. At the other heand, the eddy currents only occur at the change of a magnetic field. So the faster the field changes, the higher the currents. Now the speed in changing the magnetic field depends on the total engery stored in the coil and the internal resistance of the coil (as the resistance of the coil resists the discharge of the field). The resistance depents ont the length of the wire and the diameter of the wire. In small objects, eddy currents decay fast, as the distance in the object for the current to travel ist short. For larger objects, the eddy currents decays slower (this depents on the material as well) To detect eddy currents in objects, the energy being stored in the coil must be discharged so fast, that enough eddy currents are induced in the target object and the that the remaining voltage in the coil (aka energy) is small enough to detect the aditional voltage induced by these eddy currents.Now the nearer the coil is to an object, the better it pics up eddy currents. The larger a coil is, the larger the magnetic fielt. So for small objects, we will get small and fast eddy currents. So we need to be near to the object, thus using a small coil (with low stored energy in the coil). For large object, large coils are used. In this case large and slow eddy currents occur in the objects, so even being away from the object and being slow in coil discharge we are still being able to pick up the eddy currents. Hope this explains a bit.Regards,Joris

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester6 months ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    That is basically correct but in this case, size matters. The test code is too large for the internal 1024 bytes of EEPROM in an Arduino Nano (the Mega would solve this problem). But when limiting the test code only to a few ICs this definitely could be done. Another idea would be, to hard-programm the test code into the flash (lots of kbytes available) and use memprog to retrieve the data. Currently I am not anymore following up on this tester, as there are by now read cheap and relieable tester available and the tester just sits around unused at home...

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  • Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - Flip Coil

    Great to hear. Do you have feedback? What was the problems with the mosfets?

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  • Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - Flip Coil

    Thanks for hinting me. That's rather unfortunate, as the description and the circuit was quite nice. I changed the decription and gave a hint to an alternative way finding the circuit.

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  • JorBi's instructable How to Program an Arduino Based Metal Detector's weekly stats: 1 year ago
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  • Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap

    Hi Piine,don't worry about asking questions, that what it is all about... :-)The only relevant condenser is the one in parallel to the coil. I used a MKP type, MKT will work aswell. It is rated 310V.I finished my code today with pretty good results. The schematic needs a small update. I will take care of that in the weekend, including a varaint with fast analog read. I designed a housing as well, to be included soon too.Don't hesistate with further questions.

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  • Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap

    Hi Piine,exchange of thoughts and experience is more than welcome.I published a new instructable about the code only yesterday.... unfortaunately the depths are given in cm. So it gives rather pinpointing-ability

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  • Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap

    Hi Piine, Thanks for looking at the design. The missing parts you are pointing out are not needed. The schemativ was created out of an other schematic. So when I deleted the parts, I forgot to renumber the parts.For the questions on the MOSFET: There might be the potential to get higher depth by choosing higher supply voltage. I tried 12V, but it resulted in heating of the MOSFET, resulting in major drift of the measured values. So I chose to stick to the 5V to start with. It might be woth experimenting with other voltages and MOSFETS, BUT: the given Arduino code is at its limits. I have been working on a mutch more stable and faster code during the last month planning to publish this in a few day. Choosing higher voltage therefor might not get better results due to the poor code.For ot...

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    Hi Piine, Thanks for looking at the design. The missing parts you are pointing out are not needed. The schemativ was created out of an other schematic. So when I deleted the parts, I forgot to renumber the parts.For the questions on the MOSFET: There might be the potential to get higher depth by choosing higher supply voltage. I tried 12V, but it resulted in heating of the MOSFET, resulting in major drift of the measured values. So I chose to stick to the 5V to start with. It might be woth experimenting with other voltages and MOSFETS, BUT: the given Arduino code is at its limits. I have been working on a mutch more stable and faster code during the last month planning to publish this in a few day. Choosing higher voltage therefor might not get better results due to the poor code.For other PI detectors: yes there are some great other detectors published. My favorite being the GoldPic of Trevor Hill. There is the FoxiPi, surfPI but also the FelezJoo Pi, the Teemo DIY detector and the TPMID. Her on Instructables TechKiwiGadgets published some great designs aswell.The geneal problem: either they are complex and good, or simple with limited abilities. I am still trying for the simple and good one.... :-)For the detector/object chart: The represents the detection distance (air) for different detectors for different objects.

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  • Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - Flip Coil

    Dear antoniobras,It would be helpful if you would ask your question in English. I took the time to write everything in English (not being native-speaker). I am sure we will find a solution to the problem.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester1 year ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Hi HijaziP,unfortunately I do not understand the question. The code for arduino (which is basically C) is attached in the instructable. What else are you looking for?

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  • JorBi's instructable Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector - LC-Trap's weekly stats: 1 year ago
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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector1 year ago
    Arduino Based Pulse Induction Detector

    I used different wire diameters for the coils (whatever I could find at my desk) The 200mm coil is made of 0.8mm wire, the smaller coils are made of 0.4mm copper wire. I probably will test different diameters to find out if they make a difference.I am not sure if other alloys would make any difference.The oscilation of the coil due to distributed capacity is indeed something to keep in mind. This mainly influences the damping resistor. Here is some room for experimenting, as the given value in the schematic was found by trying different values to obtain the best results.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester2 years ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Feel free to modify and improve.Just keep in mind, that it was difficult to create the circuit with a 32 pin version of the atmega328. A 20 pin version (I thought it might be a 28 pin version) might be difficult due to the missing ADC6 and ADC7.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester2 years ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Hi wkozey,Seems to be a database problem. It should say "Database V0003" if it does not, the data were not stored properly. Please note that for uploading the database the serial terminal and the IC tester must be set to 1200 baut. Otherwise the Arduino is to slow in writing the data to the EEPROM and data will be lost.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester2 years ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    Hi,My first guess would be, that the library is not found, as the "positive" is declared in the "<LiquidCrystal_I2C.h>" library. As Arduino changed the place and the way libraries are found after Arduino 1.6.5 I am not sure how to solve this (that was one of the reasons I stayed with 1.6.5). Probably someone else can solve this or a google search will turn someting up.

    Hi,it would be helpfull when you could describe the problems you are fighting with. I am using Win10 with Arduino 1.6.5. That is working without problems. The newer versions caused a lot of troubles including some schetches not working at all. That is the reason I am still using the older 1.6.5 version.So if youu could describe your problems more in detail, probably someone could help you to solve them.

    Hi,according to the datasheet, the WP (write protect) pin must be connected to GND or left unconnected to be able to write to it. To protect it from writing, it must be connected to VCC. As the latest update of the programm allows to upload the data to the EEPROM, the WP pin should be connected to GND, as shown in the circuit.

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  • JorBi commented on JorBi's instructable Arduino IC-Tester2 years ago
    Arduino IC-Tester

    a standard 10k resistor does the job.

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