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KarenP177

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  • Knitting Compostable Eco-Stools

    Where do you get your macrame cord, and how much is it for how much yardage? I need this exact stuff for sewing projects, and I have to pay about $1.79 per yard at JoAnn Fabrics, IF they have it in stock. What is your source, and is it cheaper?

    You could also make some great shopping bags this way.

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  • How to Clean Sticky Rubber

    I don't know about sticky traction coatings, but when I was young we didn't have specifically packaged and marketed removers for sticky price tags (like Goof-Off and Goo-Gone), We used lighter fluid (the stuff you fill an old fashioned cigarette lighter with); Worked quite well.

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  • Socks the Old Way on a CSM

    This was originally marketed as a cottage industry. Sort of like those ads you would see for Make Money Stuffing Envelopes At Home! You would knit socks at home and the company would pay you a pittance for every pair you knit. But you were renting the machine from them and buying the yarn from them, so you didn't end up making much. The old machines and modern reproductions are very popular today with the novelty knitters and those who like to spin and dye their own yarn. I know a few people in my local spinning guild who do this. If you're looking for more personal help with where to buy a machine, and how to do it, check out spinning and knitting clubs in your area and ads in knitting magazines. There might also be some books out there on how to machine knit socks. Never tried …

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    This was originally marketed as a cottage industry. Sort of like those ads you would see for Make Money Stuffing Envelopes At Home! You would knit socks at home and the company would pay you a pittance for every pair you knit. But you were renting the machine from them and buying the yarn from them, so you didn't end up making much. The old machines and modern reproductions are very popular today with the novelty knitters and those who like to spin and dye their own yarn. I know a few people in my local spinning guild who do this. If you're looking for more personal help with where to buy a machine, and how to do it, check out spinning and knitting clubs in your area and ads in knitting magazines. There might also be some books out there on how to machine knit socks. Never tried it myself; I'm more interested in the spinning wheels than in making yarn with them.

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  • DIY $5 Heated Chicken Waterer

    I believe they do make bird bath heaters. Check your farm store or garden center.

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  • DIY $5 Heated Chicken Waterer

    This looks like a good idea for my feral cat colony. I normally run an extension cord out my back door to an electrically heated 1gal dog dish that has a thermostat to shut off the heater when the dish is empty. It is not cheap, but it works well, and I can usually get several years use out of a dish before it wears out. I was looking at this as a cheaper solution, but I wonder about tipping; it is rather tall for the width of the base, and all the weight (the water) is at the top. With cats (and racoons) trying to drink out of it, I'm not sure this would be safe. I would take a piece of 2x12 or wider and route a circular groove that the can would sit in on the base for greater stability. I would think that a metal pan would be needed for the heat transfer to work. It looks like your…

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    This looks like a good idea for my feral cat colony. I normally run an extension cord out my back door to an electrically heated 1gal dog dish that has a thermostat to shut off the heater when the dish is empty. It is not cheap, but it works well, and I can usually get several years use out of a dish before it wears out. I was looking at this as a cheaper solution, but I wonder about tipping; it is rather tall for the width of the base, and all the weight (the water) is at the top. With cats (and racoons) trying to drink out of it, I'm not sure this would be safe. I would take a piece of 2x12 or wider and route a circular groove that the can would sit in on the base for greater stability. I would think that a metal pan would be needed for the heat transfer to work. It looks like your chicken waterer is plastic. It's not too hot for the plastic, yet it is hot enough to keep the water melted? What if it runs dry? Is the plastic damaged from the heat?

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  • Mickey & Minnie Topiary

    How did they get the costumes on and off? Were they able to slip over their heads, or did you have an opening down the back? What is the purpose in using the Spanish moss? In the photos at least, all I see is the leaves.

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  • This would also make a great cat toy for the pets contest. Use smooth ribbon, not looped so it doesn't get caught on their claws, and you can make the stick a bit longer.

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  • KarenP177 followed jlaake
      • Airplane Prop Car Accessory
      • Mini Nerf-compatible Blaster
      • 3-Dimensional Sliding Tile Puzzle
  • I don't think you would be allowed to put anything on the front that would obscure even part of your field of vision, but it would be fun on the back. I remember in the 60's when VW Beetles were the "fun" car, and people would do all sorts of things to them, including put a fake wind-up key on the back held with a suction cup. Using your design to put a revolving wind-up key on the back of a Smart Car could be just as funny.

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  • I make these out of pet food bags, and I use a very similar method. I fold my handles in thirds, not quarters, but that probably works just the same. I fold the top over just once, on the theory that the plastic will not ravel and there's no sense in making the top edge too stiff (I thought). On the other hand, considering what comes in your bags, they probably hold 40 or 50 pounds and are quite large. I'm use to working with 16 or 18 pound cat food bags. I was surprised you cut them apart, sewed then inside out, then turned them. I have noticed that when the bags get crinkled up a lot they look a lot less attractive, so I have always sewed them right side out using the original width of the bag so there are no side seams, just one seam on the bottom. Your's look quite nice. Maybe…

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    I make these out of pet food bags, and I use a very similar method. I fold my handles in thirds, not quarters, but that probably works just the same. I fold the top over just once, on the theory that the plastic will not ravel and there's no sense in making the top edge too stiff (I thought). On the other hand, considering what comes in your bags, they probably hold 40 or 50 pounds and are quite large. I'm use to working with 16 or 18 pound cat food bags. I was surprised you cut them apart, sewed then inside out, then turned them. I have noticed that when the bags get crinkled up a lot they look a lot less attractive, so I have always sewed them right side out using the original width of the bag so there are no side seams, just one seam on the bottom. Your's look quite nice. Maybe I'll try it your way with one of my larger bags. It never occurred to me to check with the local zoo. We have a very nice large one here in Milwaukee. I would guess most of the pelletized feed is for grain eaters. Bags like that mostly need the dust rinsed out of them. With cat and dog food, I have to scrub a lot to get the oil and smell out of them. I'll give our zoo a call! Thanks.

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  • I think they were piped as domes, not spheres. Think of an old straw beehive. Once they have been baked hard on the outside, you pick it up and scrape off excess from the inside to make them thinner. A dome is half a sphere or ball. You put two domes together to make a sphere. I was going by the pictures. I went back and read the directions very carefully, it still made sense. I think you just got the terminology a little confused. Happens to me too; I have to translate everything into pictures in my head, so I just skim the words and follow the pictures. ;)

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  • Encourage your little helper. That's how I got started. In a family with no boys, I was "Dad's helper" for basement and home repair projects. I learned a lot that way. Came in handy when I bought my 1903 "fixer". Just don't give her a can of water and a brush to pretend-pain the house and expect an untended open can of paint to go unnoticed. My dad learned that the hard way!

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  • I glued a cork to a piece on dowel rod to make a holder. This makes it easy for even small kids to participate. I also use a large c-clamp to grasp the hairdryer and create a stand for it to hold it pointing upward. I do this every year at a holiday craft and gift Make-a-thon at our makerspace. I set up two hairdryers (any more requires running an extension cord to another socket). I have the kid (or adult) chose their crayons from a box of broken crayons we've accumulated (MUST be Crayola brand!) then I cut the pieces put them in the ornament, stick it on the cork, and hand it to the child. Sometimes I make a joke about "toasting your marshmallow". That way I can have two people making ornaments while others are choosing crayons or waiting in line with their "ornam…

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    I glued a cork to a piece on dowel rod to make a holder. This makes it easy for even small kids to participate. I also use a large c-clamp to grasp the hairdryer and create a stand for it to hold it pointing upward. I do this every year at a holiday craft and gift Make-a-thon at our makerspace. I set up two hairdryers (any more requires running an extension cord to another socket). I have the kid (or adult) chose their crayons from a box of broken crayons we've accumulated (MUST be Crayola brand!) then I cut the pieces put them in the ornament, stick it on the cork, and hand it to the child. Sometimes I make a joke about "toasting your marshmallow". That way I can have two people making ornaments while others are choosing crayons or waiting in line with their "ornament on a stick". This year I went through 114 ornaments.

    I found that the plastic ones did not transmit the heat as well.

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  • #5 If the clog is in the kitchen sink, try this first: pour an entire kettle of boiling water down the drain. The clog is most likely cooking grease that was liquid when you dumped it, but solidified in the pipes where they were cooler. The boiling water will melt it again. Better yet, put some dish soap in the boiling water so it will mix the grease with the water. If the clog is in the bathroom sink or tub, go to a hardware or big box home store and get a tool that looks like the fishbones of a eel. it's a strip of flexible plastic with barbs on it. you work it down into your drain as far as you can go, then pull it out. The clog is most likely hair and that should pull all or most of it out. If those cures don't work, THEN try the drain cleaner (and I've always had good resul…

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    #5 If the clog is in the kitchen sink, try this first: pour an entire kettle of boiling water down the drain. The clog is most likely cooking grease that was liquid when you dumped it, but solidified in the pipes where they were cooler. The boiling water will melt it again. Better yet, put some dish soap in the boiling water so it will mix the grease with the water. If the clog is in the bathroom sink or tub, go to a hardware or big box home store and get a tool that looks like the fishbones of a eel. it's a strip of flexible plastic with barbs on it. you work it down into your drain as far as you can go, then pull it out. The clog is most likely hair and that should pull all or most of it out. If those cures don't work, THEN try the drain cleaner (and I've always had good results with Drano).

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  • What were some of your favorite reactions from the kids?

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  • KarenP177 commented on Bob-Bee's instructable Suitcase Pet Bed

    If you're not using a layer of plywood in the bottom, I would strongly suggest using some fender washers to give the legs some stability and keep the screws from working their way through the suitcase. I would also suggest putting the zipper in the end of the mattress cover. Be sure to make it the full length of the end. To get the cover over the foam, turn the cover inside out. Then match up the closed end of the cover with the end of the foam and turn the cover right side out as you pull it over the foam, tuck the end of the foam inside the open end, and zip shut!

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  • Many years ago I was at a medieval event where we have several amber dealers and beautiful amber jewelry is greatly prized. I leaned close to examine a large amber cabochon pendant a woman was wearing... and burst out laughing! She had embeded a very tiny VW Beetle in casting resin. "Bug" amber.

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  • You should bring the Legway and the Steamroller to Maker Faire Milwaukee Sept 28-30 and show them off! milwaukee.makerfaire.com

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  • I have used denture cleaner tablets to get gunk out of the bottom of narrow necked vases and water bottles. I think it's the foaming action that does it. Never thought of using it on drains, but why not! On the other hand, if you're talking about a bathroom sink, I find that what clogs those up in usually hair. After all, where do you stand to comb your hair? Right. The mirror over the sink. For that there's a neat little gadget available at most hardware and big box stores meant to deal with hair. It's a strip of flexible plastic with a hole in one end for your finger and little spines along it's length that point upward (toward the handle.) Remove the stopper, and feed the tool down the drain as far as you can possibly go, and pull out a nasty hairball!

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  • KarenP177 commented on apapercraft's instructable PVC Shoe Rack

    Bunk-beds for cats!

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  • This is great for while you're on a trip, but if you are doing this just because you have a busy schedule, if you have pets find some way of covering the buckets so they don't drink out of them. Water that sits for several days or more can develop bacterial growth that is harmful to them, and if you add tree preservative to the water, it's even worse. Someone suggested gift wrapping the buckets to hide them, and that brought to mind the image of a box just big enough to cover the bucket with a slot cut into one side and partly across the top to accommodate the hose and then gift wrapped. Camouflage and pet-protection in one! (I'm assuming that if you take a long trip, you would take your pets with or board them.)

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  • This would have been a very appropriate costume for my compulsive eater. She would eat anything she could get her claws on, and was shaped rather like a dumpling.

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  • Great! I like your Chick Fil tie-in. We don't have that chain in Milwaukee, but I think dairy cows are probably the state mammal in Wisconsin. Several years ago at a Halloween pet event I saw a medium sized smooth coated black and white dog dressed up as a cow. The owners took a cheap canvas work glove, stuffed it, and painted it pink. I was hung from a "belt" like you did. The also made a pair of horns that tied around his head. It got a lot of attention. I think the best costumes are the ones that work with what your pet has already, whether size, markings, or breed. Two of the best I ever saw were a chihuahua wearing a taco shell (a rebuttal to the over-done dachshund in a hot dog bun), and a guy and his doberman dressed as a swat officer and his K9, but with pink an…

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    Great! I like your Chick Fil tie-in. We don't have that chain in Milwaukee, but I think dairy cows are probably the state mammal in Wisconsin. Several years ago at a Halloween pet event I saw a medium sized smooth coated black and white dog dressed up as a cow. The owners took a cheap canvas work glove, stuffed it, and painted it pink. I was hung from a "belt" like you did. The also made a pair of horns that tied around his head. It got a lot of attention. I think the best costumes are the ones that work with what your pet has already, whether size, markings, or breed. Two of the best I ever saw were a chihuahua wearing a taco shell (a rebuttal to the over-done dachshund in a hot dog bun), and a guy and his doberman dressed as a swat officer and his K9, but with pink and orange emblems that resembled Dunkin" Donuts; they were the "Donut Police".

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  • From my understanding of microwaves, they need moisture or oil in whatever you are microwave to heat it. So plastic probably would not soften being microwaved alone. Some microwavable trays are #1 or #5 plastic, but I don't see many that are #2 or #4. I think the hot food in a HDPE plate might soften or warp it.

    Glue HDPE? Not likely. Heat weld, maybe.

    There was another instructable where someone cut the top off a soda can and heated up strips of a bottle in it until soft, pressed it down in the can and added more strips to heat and press down. When it cooled, he cut the can off, chucked it in a lathe, and turned whatever fitting he needed. It was either Instructable, or Make Magazine site.

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  • Let's hear it for good ol' Johnson's Paste Wax! My dad had a can of it that was older than me which he used on woodworking projects. When I got him into working with me restoring antique spinning wheels, we quickly finished off that can and bought another. I currently have his approximately 70 year old Craftsman table saw in storage, which is why your Indestructible caught my interest. I had never thought of using Johnson's on metal. Maybe the next time I go to the storage facility I'll give it a good coat to prevent it from rusting.

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